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Hot Rod

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About Hot Rod

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    Youngstown, OH

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  1. The first and cheapest point I would start is tire air pressure. That can make a HUGE difference in ride quality when lightly loaded as is typical in rv service. I just took a quick look at michelin's website for reference and a given 22.5 tire shows recommended inflation ranging from 75 psi to 120psi depending on the load and single/dual. Scale your axles and inflate appropriately. Each tire manufacturer should have a load/inflation chart on their website. When we first swapped from a dually to a mdt with 22.5 tires, I automatically set them at max inflation like on the dually and it rod
  2. Just from some related experience in the lowrider air suspension business in past years... many air bags are available in the same configuration, but with or without the internal bump stops. No bump stop allows a little more travel, with a bump stop the bag won't collapse all the way plus it keeps the bag from bottoming out hard on a bad bump. I don't know if the cab air bags are available both ways, but a knowledgeable counter guy with firestone book shouldn't have any problem figuring that out.
  3. That's pretty funny. I don't think anybody else picked up on that 78% nitrogen is just normal air.
  4. Can anybody simply answer his question? Which was NOT "should I single long", it was "does any body know a shop in my area?" Every time anybody mentions singling on this forum it devolves into a free for all on single/tandem/short/long/mid/duals/super single and everybody is sure they are right and everybody else is wrong. Just answer the man's question.
  5. I have not done that in an HDT, but I did on my last dually. Stripped the entire interior to the sheetmetal and stuck dynamat extreme on every metal surface and body panel I could put it. Then used another dynamat product that I can't remember the name of that looks like 1/2" thick foam rubber and stuffed that in all the voids in pillars, roof bracing, etc and as far up the firewall as I could get it, and behind interior panels. That thing was QUIET. On the interstate the loudest thing was the wind whispering on the glass. Almost too quiet, I'm a car guy and used to having an ear open fo
  6. I thought of that after my post as well. Most harley dealers have a rider training course several times a year. It was an all day course and used to (maybe still does) cost about $250, and you end the day with all the paperwork to go down to the bmv and get your complete unrestricted motorcycle endorsement. And the best part is they supply the motorcycles, so you get to mess up and drop their bike and not scratch up yours. Any you WILL drop it one or twice. Any old biker that tells you they never dropped their bike is simply a liar. Any rider of any skill lever can benefit from a beginne
  7. I happen to be one of the aforementioned gray haired old bikers. Ours does get ridden plenty though. No TT (tavern to tavern) riders here. Couple hundred miles is about right for an nice ride out to lunch and back. Anyway.... you wouldn't catch these particular gray haired old bikers on anything but a Harley, but in all fairness the quality and reliability factor on any new machine is going to be good. Sure, might get a lemon, but by and large you can expect about zero issues on a new machine that you maintain properly. Any of your choices have the size and weight to fit on the deck of
  8. Sure, I'll jump in, why not. China build does not automatically equal low quality. The Chinese manufacturers build their products to the specs required by their customers here in the U.S. If I as a U.S. based distributor want to source the absolute cheapest piece of junk that will technically meet dot standards so I can sell them as cheaply as possible, China will happily build those for me. If I want to source the absolute best quality product in the industry and I and my customers are willing to pay for that, China will happily build those for me. China is not just about cheap junk,
  9. I am absolutely sure you consented. It is somewhere in that mile and a half of fine print on the 37 forms you signed that nobody reads when you bought the truck.
  10. No question you have to stay in the Keys to get the experience. No matter how long you stay, you will not want to leave. The first time we went for a week and stayed two. The next year we went for two weeks and stayed three. The next year we stayed a month. The year after that we stretched it so six weeks. You get the idea. You end up on "Keys time" and are just not in a hurry any more. And after a bunch of years we have still not made it to all the little off the beaten path spots there are to find and enjoy. Allow some time for bridge fishing and take a kayak. We were used to mainl
  11. Picky picky. I do carry a lot of bug meat, but no chrome or fringe. But I should have said it was outfitted like an Ultra Classic, with fairing lowers, tour pack, and extra audio, whose weight is 917# wet. So my memory was a little off. Add in helmets, leather jackets, chaps for me and the boss and general crap that rides in the saddle bags it's pushing 1000#. Before we strap on luggage for a long trip...
  12. Dry weight on my Street Glide is 950, then add the tour pack, saddle bags full of crap, and my fat ass, and my rational motorcyle is heavier than that Spyder. But to the questions, zero worries on hitch or stabilzers in place or not, the trailer will not even notice you riding in. Just go at a reasonably quick speed and let the momentum do the work. The only way you get in trouble is if you chicken out and try to stop halfway up and back it down. Not good. Keep it rolling and trust your skills.
  13. True story, I once passed a Ram 1500 shortbed pulling a fifth wheel and a PONTOON boat. Going 45 down the interstate with the nose pointed at the sky.
  14. I am sure that is the government reasoning for you. Every commercial truck needs an ifta sticker, whether or not you actually purchase any fuel is irrelevant...
  15. Hot Rod

    Smart tires

    Per the "ultimate wheel and tire plus sizing guide" that stays on my desk as the "bible" in the wheel business: The 175/55/15 size is recommended for 5.0" to 6.0" wheels. Out in the real world any tire will certainly squeeze onto a 1/2" narrower wheel, only possible adverse affect is the tire may crown slightly on the narrower wheel and may show minor premature wear in the center of the tread. And I do mean minor, most would never notice the difference in tire mileage with the limited miles most of you are putting on. Should be no clearance issues with the 175/55/15 on the front a
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