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Bunkhouse length questions


eiblanco
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Hi all-

 

I am looking into buying a travel trailer, and am towing with a 2014 Tundra with the towing package.  I have a family of 4, myself and wife and 2 children ages 6 and 8. 

 

I went to the recent RV show in Denver, and my wife and I liked the Jayco Jayfeather 24BH.  There is also a 22BH in the same line up.

 

In camping around Colorado (we live in Colorado Springs)  Is there a huge difference in camp site availability between the two models? The 24 BH is just over 30 feet, and the 22BH is 28' 10".  

 

The GVWR is the same for both trailers, at 7,500 lbs, which is well within the limits for my truck.  

 

Another question, is there a significant difference between the Jay Feather and the Jay Flight lines?  Would you prefer one over the other?

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My biggest concern about these units is the cargo carrying capacity. 1420-1935 is not a lot for four people. How much can you carry in your Tundra? You'll use close to 500 of your maximum CCC if you fill your fresh water tank. Check out your current pantry--how much does the food in it weigh? I mean a 16 ounce package of anything is a full pound right there. Add clothes, kitchenware, and toys and what are the odds you'll be overweight before you ever pull out of your driveway?

When we were deciding if we could live in a low capacity rig we actually weighed everything we were considering taking before we bought the rig. We had to substitute cotton slacks for jeans and plastic dishes for Corelle, etc. What are you willing to leave at home to fit into one of these trailers?

If you can live within those limitations, I would choose 24BH of those two just because I like the location of the TV--straight on viewing from the dinette so no crick in the neck. :)

Linda Sand

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1 hour ago, eiblanco said:

Hi all-

I am looking into buying a travel trailer, and am towing with a 2014 Tundra with the towing package.  I have a family of 4, myself and wife and 2 children ages 6 and 8.

Welcome to the forums!

OK I have to assume you looked up exactly your truck as equipped. Take another look because I believe you have too little truck for a family of four. We live in the Springs too.

"The 2014 Toyota Tundra maximum towing capacity is between 4,000 lbs and 10,500 lbs, depending on the truck’s specifications."

If asking about truck weight capacities we need all the specs. Here is a good fact sheet on all the variations of your truck. If you have not read it I would read it all the way through and then come back with the full specs and model/emngine and what your label in the driver's door says about maximum combined weight capacity then weigh the truck as loaded for RVing with all gear and passengers and then you can do the math.

https://tailoredtrucks.com/blog/2014-toyota-tundra-towing-capacity/

Hope that helps.

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image.thumb.png.d8d717b1a8cd2f0e6febc9680ee1258f.pngYes, the above is the spec sheet for my truck, and per the manufacturer it is rated to tow 9,500 lbs in its particular configuration, being a 4x4.  I have towed a similar trailer I rented and felt comfortable in the mountain passes in Colorado.

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When towing a trailer with a half ton truck of any sort, the limiting factor is more likely to be payload than towing capacity.  Payload varies by each vehicle, it depends on the features it has.  For instance, I used to have an F150 that had just over 1700 lbs of payload.  A friend of mine had one with a different trim level but had the same engine and max tow package, and their payload was only 1400.  I once saw a 2017 half ton Ram that had a payload of only 1068 lbs.  The only way to verify what a particular truck has for payload is to look at the sticker on the driver’s side door.

The tongue weight of the trailer should be 10% minimum of the trailer’s weight.  My trailer tows better when the tongue weight is 12-13%.  I use the GVWR for the weight of the trailer - mine is almost always close to that.  Some trailers are naturally either tongue heavy or tongue light, depending on how they are designed (i.e., how far forward are the axles, where is the slide, galley, etc.) and you may need to consider that when choosing a tow vehicle.

So you have a trailer with 7500 lb GVWR.  It doesn’t have a huge amount of cargo capacity so the trailer is going to be at that weight most likely.  That means your tongue weight will be a minimum of 750 lbs but could be higher (like 900 lbs).

Let’s take the 750 lbs.  That’s weight that is carried on the truck so is part of the truck’s payload.  Then the weight of the occupants is also carried by the truck.  Let’s say you have 2 adults and 2 relatively small children - perhaps the total weight is 400 - 500 lbs (potentially more).  Let’s use 500 lbs since kids grow fast.  That means that without adding anything to the truck, it will be carrying 1250 lbs (750+500).  Add a cooler, a few tools, a jack, maybe a suitcase with some toys for the kids, and you are most likely going to be hitting the truck’s GVWR.  That does NOT include carrying any firewood or propane fire ring, folding or bag chairs, grill, etc.  Do you have a hobby that might be equipment intensive (mine is photography and cameras, battery chargers, lenses, laptop computer, and so on gets heavy quickly).

Are you thinking about dry camping a lot?  If so, how are you planning on keeping your batteries charged?  Are you thinking of a generator?  That can add another 50 lbs.  Do you have a dog?  Both dog and dog food add weight.

I know people who tow trailers with similar GVWR with Tundras, and they do very well because they are older couples and don’t take a lot of things with them.  They’ll get to their location, fill their fresh water tank near where they are camping, drop the trailer and then go buy firewood locally.  They don’t travel with computers or gaming devices or anything like that.  So it can be done if you are careful and really work at it.

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On 1/19/2023 at 9:22 AM, fpmtngal said:

When towing a trailer with a half ton truck of any sort, the limiting factor is more likely to be payload than towing capacity.  Payload varies by each vehicle, it depends on the features it has.  For instance, I used to have an F150 that had just over 1700 lbs of payload.  A friend of mine had one with a different trim level but had the same engine and max tow package, and their payload was only 1400.  I once saw a 2017 half ton Ram that had a payload of only 1068 lbs.  The only way to verify what a particular truck has for payload is to look at the sticker on the driver’s side door.

The tongue weight of the trailer should be 10% minimum of the trailer’s weight.  My trailer tows better when the tongue weight is 12-13%.  I use the GVWR for the weight of the trailer - mine is almost always close to that.  Some trailers are naturally either tongue heavy or tongue light, depending on how they are designed (i.e., how far forward are the axles, where is the slide, galley, etc.) and you may need to consider that when choosing a tow vehicle.

So you have a trailer with 7500 lb GVWR.  It doesn’t have a huge amount of cargo capacity so the trailer is going to be at that weight most likely.  That means your tongue weight will be a minimum of 750 lbs but could be higher (like 900 lbs).

Let’s take the 750 lbs.  That’s weight that is carried on the truck so is part of the truck’s payload.  Then the weight of the occupants is also carried by the truck.  Let’s say you have 2 adults and 2 relatively small children - perhaps the total weight is 400 - 500 lbs (potentially more).  Let’s use 500 lbs since kids grow fast.  That means that without adding anything to the truck, it will be carrying 1250 lbs (750+500).  Add a cooler, a few tools, a jack, maybe a suitcase with some toys for the kids, and you are most likely going to be hitting the truck’s GVWR.  That does NOT include carrying any firewood or propane fire ring, folding or bag chairs, grill, etc.  Do you have a hobby that might be equipment intensive (mine is photography and cameras, battery chargers, lenses, laptop computer, and so on gets heavy quickly).

Are you thinking about dry camping a lot?  If so, how are you planning on keeping your batteries charged?  Are you thinking of a generator?  That can add another 50 lbs.  Do you have a dog?  Both dog and dog food add weight.

I know people who tow trailers with similar GVWR with Tundras, and they do very well because they are older couples and don’t take a lot of things with them.  They’ll get to their location, fill their fresh water tank near where they are camping, drop the trailer and then go buy firewood locally.  They don’t travel with computers or gaming devices or anything like that.  So it can be done if you are careful and really work at it.

Very interesting discussion, and pertinent to my situation.  My truck's max payload is 1415 lbs, and with a tongue weight of 750 lbs and the occupants weight of 400, it leaves 265 pounds of potential cargo in the vehicle.  Food for thought.

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The published figures are only a beginning point. For instance, the  published weights are normally for a 150# driver, no passengers or equipment in the  bed or  cab, ½tank of gas. That does not include the W/D hitch weight.

To eliminate salespersons hype and chest-beating  from other Toyota owners, use this online towing calculator to accurately and impartially match your tow vehicle to a trailer. You'll note some actual scale weights are required.

Finaly, NEVER use tthe UVW of a trailer when making calculations, unless that is now you plan to go camping-nothing in the trailer.

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