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Truck Tires: Brands, Models, Steer Tires, All Purpose Tires, Air Pressure, etc


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What kind of tires do you have on your MDT? Michelin, Toyo, Bridgestone etc

 

Why did you choose the brand you did?

 

What size tire do you have? 19.5, 22.5 or ??

 

Do you have the same size on the front and back?

 

Do you use Steer Tires? If so just on the front or all the way around? Do they make a difference in the ride?

 

Do you having a steering stabilizer on your truck? ie Steer Safe or Safe T plus?

Do they need to be adjusted periodically?

 

What air pressure to you maintain?

Do you adjust the air pressure for ride comfort?

Do you have the same air pressure in the front and the back?

 

How often to you have your truck tires balanced?

 

Do you replace your truck tires based on mileage or time on the truck?

 

Would love to hear any other info you would like to share about MDT Truck Tires.

 

Thank you.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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I don't have a MDT, it is a MH, Truck tires are on it.

I have Sailun S637 Rib Tires on all 6. Size is 225/70R19.5.

I run 95 PSI on Front and 90 PSI on the Rear.

These tires ride real good, they are wearing fine, on a grooved hiway they do sometimes want to follow the groove.

I purchased these tires almost 2 years ago and they are serving me very well, at less than $1600.00 for all 6 mounted and balanced I think they were a bargain. I have a friend in New Jersy that has a tire service and does only Commercial Vehicles, he has sold Sailun tires for a while and has not seen a problem with the tires at all, he has sold a lot of them.

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In my youth, I was a tire changer for one of the largest tire facilities east of the Mississippi.
I run Michelins on our truck & trailer. They are not the cheapest brand out there which discourages many folks from purchasing them. Also note that some companies, like Goodyear, will pay for damage cause if one of their tires fails. As far as I know, that's not true for Michelin—yet I wouldn't purchase any other brand.

We run 22.5" tires for the added cushioning they provide. 19.5" would give a lower profile—just a matter of priorities, I guess.

The PSI for any tire should always be based on the tire manufacturer's load inflation chart. Ours worked out to be 70psi up front and 73 for the rears. I run steers up front and drive tread in the back. Frankly, I'm considering a "milder" tread for the drive axle next time around. Something like this one.

We don't have a steer-stablizer.
Our tires are balanced when they are installed, though recently, we have noticed a slight shaking at 55mph. I'm not going to do anything about it as we are due for new tires—based on age.
Purchasing good tires is like purchasing a good insurance policy. We spend the money in exchange for peace of mind.
Hope this helps,

Mark

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I always run the same size all the way around.

I have setups using 19.5 and 22.5.

Non 4x4 Steer tires in the front, traction tires in the back. 4x4 setup, traction tires all the way around.

I have used Michicles, Goodyear, Bridgestone, Hancook tires.

I do not have them balanced, I use Centrimatics front and rear, mount and dismount myself.

I have used steering stabilizers, they do not need adjusting.

I change my tires based on wear, I do use my trucks a lot so they do not age out.

Steer tires all the way around provides smoother ride at very slow speed only. At speed, everything smooths out, traction tires are noisier.

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We pulled the trigger and got new tires on our MDT. We went with general purpose Toyos for the price difference. There was a noticeably softer ride then the previous Michelins steer tires. We did think the front tires were a little squirrely when we first started out and weren't sure if it was the windy weather in western Nevada or if it might be because they were new? We stopped in a tire shop and had the front tires re-balanced, apparently they were quite out of balance (weights may of dropped off or were not balanced in the first place?) and now the "squirrel" is gone.

 

Thank you all for you input.

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I have a MDT.

 

I had Goodyear 245/75 22.5s. Replaced the tires 2 weeks ago. I used the same tire for both steer and drive wheels. Most tire retailers were pushing me to go with w 255 / 70 22.5. I went the other way.

 

I installed Michelin 235/80 22.5s. Bigger sidewall and slightly larger circumference. I run 90 psi all around. They were about 30 bucks cheaper each than Bridgestone.

 

I get a smoother ride due to the sidewall and slightly lower RPM...especially when bob-tailing. I balanced with dyna beads.. they are good for 2 sets of tires and don't require a screen for the valve stem. Plus they balance the rotating mass vs just the tire. Oddly enough, it was less expensive that having the tires dynamically balanced.

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Mark,

 

I agree, the 90 psi goes against the inflation table.

 

This is where theory/reality may differ. Before I put the rig away last year, I played around with the air pressures with my Goodyears because the 110 the PO was running was just to harsh. I had my rig weighed..both front and back ..and adjusted accordingly.

 

My weight numbers are probably very similar to yours:

Front axle - 6K
Rear axle (dually) - 7900K
Pin weight is @ 2K

 

At the minimum air pressure (in the charts), the truck felt "squiggly". Adding an extra 10 psi per tire firmed up the ride and got rid of the initial harshness. Anyway, I was running air pressures below 90.

 

When I did the research to buy my new tires, I talked about the weight of my truck and what I should run as far as pressure goes...drive and steer. The response was consistent across the board. BTW, I checked tire shops within a 35 mile radius of my home. Basically what I was told that heat is a big killer of tires and one of the causes of heat is under inflation. Anything pressure below 90 psi is considered under inflation. I referenced the inflation tables and they just shook their heads..

 

Frankly, I am not sure if that is a myth/tall tale but to have that consistency, it makes me wonder. I know it goes against the manufacturer's tables... but these guys deal with class 4 tires and up every day. And 90 psi is pretty smooth.

 

If this is really a line of hooey, I would like to know..

 

Thanks

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Michelin manufacturers truck tires at their Asheboro, NC, USA plant...

 

Continental is Germany owned and manufactures in the USA as well...

 

Even MOOG is subcontracting to China so the origin of a product is hard to find sometimes..

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GRASSY WROTE:

Mark,

I agree, the 90 psi goes against the inflation table.

This is where theory/reality may differ. Before I put the rig away last year, I played around with the air pressures with my Goodyears because the 110 the PO was running was just to harsh. I had my rig weighed..both front and back ..and adjusted accordingly.

My weight numbers are probably very similar to yours:

Front axle - 6K
Rear axle (dually) - 7900K
Pin weight is @ 2K

Actually, they are not but my tires are 275/80-22.5. My weights look like this:

Front axle= 8760

Rear axle(dually) = 9,380
Pin Weight = 4,930

Please realize that the inflation rating in the charts are per tire, not per axle. This from Michelin's website:

Michelin displays tire loads per axle end in the load and inflation tables. We recommend weighing each axle end separately and using the heaviest end weight to determine the axle's cold inflation tire pressure. For control of your RV, make sure tire pressures are the same across an axle, while NEVER exceeding the maximum air pressure limit stamped on the wheels.

dy3o9g.jpg

At the minimum air pressure (in the charts), the truck felt "squiggly". Adding an extra 10 psi per tire firmed up the ride and got rid of the initial harshness. Anyway, I was running air pressures below 90.

When I did the research to buy my new tires, I talked about the weight of my truck and what I should run as far as pressure goes...drive and steer. The response was consistent across the board. BTW, I checked tire shops within a 35 mile radius of my home. Basically what I was told that heat is a big killer of tires and one of the causes of heat is under inflation.

No question, heat is a big killer for tires.

Anything pressure below 90 psi is considered under inflation. I referenced the inflation tables and they just shook their heads..

I'm not sure how anyone could come to this conclusion? According to Michelin's own recommendations, 90 psi is overinflated. You stated your front axle weighs 6,000 lbs. According to their chart, you'd need a front axle weighing over 16,000 lbs (8280lbs X 2) in order to place the proper load on tires inflated to 90 psi.

Frankly, I am not sure if that is a myth/tall tale but to have that consistency, it makes me wonder. I know it goes against the manufacturer's tables... but these guys deal with class 4 tires and up every day.

I'm sure they do but I question their knowledge being superior to Michelin's engineers.

And 90 psi is pretty smooth.

If this is really a line of hooey, I would like to know..

It's not that I think their opinions are a "line of hooey" or they are trying to deceive you. I do think it's important to have a clear understanding of what's considered during the design phase of their product.
A tire should be inflated the point where the amount of pressure in the tire matches the amount of weight pushing down on it. It's important to get the optimal tread contact with the road.

2zppmd5.jpg

Michelin's engineers have figured out how to match your load. For me, I just don't see how inflating your tires to 90 psi will allow for maximum contact with the road. I don't think your tires will sit properly, which could potentially create other issues. Frankly, I would not want to be in a situation where I needed to make a panic stop with overinflated tires; not much contact between the tires and the road.
Mine is just one more opinion. I understand that you have to do what makes you feel most comfortable.

Mark

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Mark,

 

I understand your conclusions but that would mean my steers should be under 60n psi ! At 70 with the goodyears, it felt unsafe.

 

When I bought my rig, it was 110 all around.

 

You have raise an interesting conundrum.. go with what Michelin says or truck tire dealers with tons of experience. I kind of feel like a sandwich at the moment..so I will send Michelin an e-mail...

 

I will follow up..

 

BTW, last year.. I had 3 panic stops ... zero issues with stopping..in fact, there was absolutely no drama...so the tuire contact patch isn't an issue..

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  • 2 weeks later...

This is all very interesting information, next time I do tires on our large trucks, I will have to look into larger sidewalks, I feel into the trend of going lower and lower in profile and ride is terrible.

 

I will honestly say I do not trust any shops anymore. I went to several local truck shops to have tires fixed on another truck due to constant wobble. None of them could do anything about it and after a great deal of money spent decided to fix it myself. No one bothered to look at the sidewall of the tires in question ! Each had a mark for the valve stem. Took them into my shop, got the spoons out and popped off all the tires, cleaned them, inspected the rims and remounted correctly. That truck drove like a champ, all wobble gone, bead seated correctly and no weights or beads.

 

Here is what I found with my MDT, the factory sends the trucks out with 110 psi on all tires, the truck ride very badly and you can clearly see the tires are over inflated. When I got my MDT to our shop which is on a farm and it's all dirt / DG roads, I looked at the marks it left. You where are to see that the tire was over inflated. I spent about a week trying different tire pressure with loads and found 90 on the rears worked very well up to 4K lbs pin weight on the fifth wheel and 95 in front. Tire wear in the rear is very flat and looking good, tire wear in the front is what it is with crowned roads but wearing fine.

 

This is based on an average mileage of 190 per day on the MDT and 2800 mile road trip in 3 days last week. I really wanted to bring my IR meter to measure tire temperature but forget the darn thing home so I could see tire temp vs pressure. Oh well, next time.

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It has been 12 days and it is interesting to note that Michelin has not answered my question about tire pressures,.

 

I just did a 3* hour run and I am not sure if I want to go any lower. I will say the Michelins has provided a much smoother ride than my goodyears but sidewall size is only one factor.

 

Pug, do you know your weights and what are you running for air pressure.

 

I will be doing a 5000+ mile run in about 3 weeks and I am curious.

 

BTW, I felt the 2 bridgestone dealers just wanted to push tires and when I startrd asking questions, I knew they had no clue...unfortunate;y, this is the new norm...

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My truck is currently fitted with Goodyear all round. My total gross weight (truck only, no trailers) with 160 gallons of diesel, 12 gallons of def, about 100 of various crap and a 250 lbs driver is around 11,900 lbs. I do not have a break down between front and rear yet, have not had a chance yet to do it with truck. I did several runs with lower pressure (85 front, 80 rears) and the truck ran very nice, very smooth but on the goodyears but lots of tire noise which is not good.

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Pug,

 

Your rig is lighter than mine... I am at 14K..with a bias of 6/8 K.

 

According to Goodyear..with my pin weight of @ 2K, I could go 70 psi all around. So I tried it. The term I would use is scary. But that was according to the Goodyear air pressure book with my specific tires. Oh, that was without my 5th wheel. I went up to 80 all around and it was better ..tried it with my rig. Still slightly uncomfortable. Was told by the tire guys that I was crazy for doing that. The rest, I have stated.

 

"
I will honestly say I do not trust any shops anymore."

 

I have wondered about the whole spectrum of shops...so where do you go for valid info ?

 

On another topic, I broke down this weekend..,, toasted air line that goes to the solenoid on the fire wall and sporadic no power. The answer was a clogged fuel filter. It had maybe 7 k on it ? was told I should be replacing it every 4 to 5 K.. who knew ?

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The reason for making my I comment about shop is based on what I have been seeing over the years. There is no such thing as apprentice programs anymore. People come in and thought do something and now they think they are experts ! Expertise is based on experience, not training.

 

I went to a truck shop and the chap tried to unmounted a 22.5 tire from a rim using the same machine as a car tire. I told him that would not work but he insisted he knew what he was doing. After a while of no success, got help and was told that would no work and had to use the spoons. Well that was entertaining to watch !! After a while and sick and tired of waiting for my tire, showed him how to use the spoons and dismounted the tire myself ..... Damn, I could have done that at my shop and save 25.00 dollars. I got a bag full of stories about this but I will spare everyone :-)

 

What I do is take temperature readings, wear measurements and input from others with a simular truck, then make my final decision based on overall performance. The Goodyear specs on my tires and weight turned out to be over inflated (110 psi) in my opinion. Measurements showed center was only wearing and it was clearly visible the tire was crowned big time. Right now, I am a little under inflated in the front, but tire wear is good. The end of the day, I can be seriously wrong and I am not a tire expert, just working toward as much as possible even wear.

 

As for the diesel filter, that 4 to 5K is BS, you got a bad batch of rusty storage tank crap that was not filtered at the pump. Lots of places do not filter their fuel anymore and you get the end results of it. I always keep spare filter in the truck for such problems.

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As for the diesel filter, that 4 to 5K is BS, you got a bad batch of rusty storage tank crap that was not filtered at the pump. Lots of places do not filter their fuel anymore and you get the end results of it. I always keep spare filter in the truck for such problems.

 

Unfortunately, this one is true here..we just get dirty diesel from overseas..

 

I touched base with a couple of local long haul trucking firms and they say..for every oil filer, we put in 2 fuel filters..

 

Unfortunately, our Canadian government doesn't want the east coast to use Canadian product..this is a political and sad thing..

 

The question for me now is do I use a cat filer or one from parts for trucks.. oh, and I should carry a bit of spare diesel to fill the filter as well..

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  • 1 month later...

Oh boy. The only discussion that's worse than politics and religion, is tire brand and pressure on a RV/truck forum..lol.. I'm personally running two different brands, due to blowouts on a trip. But both are no name China brands. They are all postion highway tread. Had an balanced when installed, and the ride isn't bad. As for pressure, 90psi all the way around. Any more and rides rough, any less it's a bit squirrelly. I did weight each axle and the inflation recommendation per international is right on with the inflation charts, but with these tires pressure below 90 makes driving a bit more interesting than I care for....I've thought about a steering stablizer but have yet to install one. I may do it eventually, just because.

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Oh boy. The only discussion that's worse than politics and religion, is tire brand and pressure on a RV/truck forum..lol.. I'm personally running two different brands, due to blowouts on a trip. But both are no name China brands. They are all postion highway tread. Had an balanced when installed, and the ride isn't bad. As for pressure, 90psi all the way around. Any more and rides rough, any less it's a bit squirrelly. I did weight each axle and the inflation recommendation per international is right on with the inflation charts, but with these tires pressure below 90 makes driving a bit more interesting than I care for....I've thought about a steering stablizer but have yet to install one. I may do it eventually, just because.

As the tires get heat cycles on them they should firm up more. Allowing you to run a lower pressure. Our steers are Yokohama when they were new I ran them at 105lb. After several thousand miles- and hot cold cycles they run nicely at 90-90psi.

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Just arrived home from my 5K mile trip. I have to say that ride has improved with the new tires. As well, road surface changes how the truck feels.

 

Honestly, not sure if I want to go with a lower pressure. A TMPS will not be purchased until we go long term in a couple of years so I cannot monitor what is happening with each tire...but I am not sure if I do go lower if there will be any improvement with the ride..we are pretty darn smooth now...however, I am not adverse to playing and if what Jim mentioned works, I shall play a bit soon.

 

Thanks..

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