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Class B non commercial drivers license


solaction

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In Texas, the "exempt" (non-commercial) tests are handled exactly the same as commercial...you simply get a class B (or A) license instead of your existing class C, and if I remember correctly you save a few bucks (not many). In other words, your license won't say "COMMERCIAL DRIVER LICENSE" across the top, just "DRIVER LICENSE". Simply study what you see for commercial and be ready to be tested on it.

 

I remember your previous post about bringing your truck home, and it sounds like you're throwing in the towel regarding both commercial and class A. Are you going to go back for commercial and A later? You could just get the commercial license now, and self-certify that you're not involved in intra-state or inter-state commerce to bypass the hassle of the medical exam/card/whatever. (I got my CDL/A in PA in 1995, and transferred it to TX in 2000. When it came time to renew, sometime around April 2012, the new medical requirements caught up to me by surprise, but since I never drove professionally I was able to self-certify that I was exempt.) You'd simply have to go back with medical in hand and update to be involved in intra-state or inter-state commerce when you begin hauling your race car etc.

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Do what do I need to study for the test? Or is there a website I can go to that has study material?

 

Get the Texas CDL license manual off the DPS website and study the chapter that pertains to marker lights, where to put your reflective triangles, etc. I forget which chapter it is, but that's the one you do the written test on.

 

Direct link to Commercial Driver Handbook here http://www.txdps.state.tx.us/internetforms/Forms/DL-7C.pdf

 

Note that you generally can't do the written and the driven test the same day.

 

Wondering if it might make more sense just to wait until you get the trailer and do the "A". B is only for a single vehicle that weights over 26,000 lbs pulling a trailer no more than 10,000 lbs. If your truck is less than 26,000 you don't need a B to drive it so I'm not sure there's any advantage to getting the B then the A.

 

Michelle

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Michelle, a "B" license is for any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 lbs or more. It is not actual weight that matters but weight rating. Any Class 7 or 8 truck, (like the one in the OP's avatar) has a GVWR of 26,001 lbs or greater. A typical 3 axle HDT will have a GVWR around 48-52,000 lbs.

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An A CDL requires testing with a qualified tractor and trailer. A B CDL only requires a qualified truck.

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CDL A, commercial or exempt is the same and that is what I said

What Mark meant is that a Class A "DL", commercial or exempt is the same.

 

a CDL is commercial and a DL is not commercial.

MY PEOPLE SKILLS ARE JUST FINE.
~It's my tolerance to idiots that needs work.~

2005 Volvo 780 VED12 465hp / Freedomline transmission
singled mid position / Bed by Larry Herrin
2018 customed Mobile Suites 40KSSB3 

2014 smart Fortwo

 

 
 
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Doesn't the class B exempt (non commercial) cover only if you are towing less than 10000#? If you are towing over 10,000# you need the class A exempt.

 

Ken

Amateur radio operator, 2023 Cougar 22MLS, 2022 F150 Lariat 4x4 Off Road, Sport trim <br />Travel with 1 miniature schnauzer, 1 standard schnauzer and one African Gray parrot

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Depends on the state. Remember, exempt licenses are state options unlike the CDL which has to fully follow Federal Regulations.

 

In Maryland a Exempt B will cover a RV trailer combination.

Please click for Emails instead of PM
Mark & Dale
Joey - 2016 Bounder 33C Tige - 2006 40' Travel Supreme
Sparky III - 2021 Mustang Mach-e, off the the Road since 2019
Useful HDT Truck, Trailer, and Full-timing Info at
www.dmbruss.com

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Michelle, a "B" license is for any single vehicle with a GVWR of 26,001 lbs or more. It is not actual weight that matters but weight rating. Any Class 7 or 8 truck, (like the one in the OP's avatar) has a GVWR of 26,001 lbs or greater. A typical 3 axle HDT will have a GVWR around 48-52,000 lbs.

 

Thanks - I did not realize that just the tractor/HDT would have that high a GVWR. I have a "B" due to our motorhome.

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Ken, in Texas you are correct, but as Mark said...it depends on where you are.

MY PEOPLE SKILLS ARE JUST FINE.
~It's my tolerance to idiots that needs work.~

2005 Volvo 780 VED12 465hp / Freedomline transmission
singled mid position / Bed by Larry Herrin
2018 customed Mobile Suites 40KSSB3 

2014 smart Fortwo

 

 
 
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