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Rv safe cleaning products


fearlessfangs

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Inside, I use Awesome! that can be found at any of the dollar stores. In the past, I've also used Simple Green.

 

Outside, we use 303 Aerospace cleaner on all rubber items (tires, slideout seals, etc.) and Bullet for cleaning the body. I've also used Bullet for our solid surface countertops inside the rig, not to clean, but to help protect the surface.

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Inside, I use Awesome! that can be found at any of the dollar stores. In the past, I've also used Simple Green.

 

Outside, we use 303 Aerospace cleaner on all rubber items (tires, slideout seals, etc.) and Bullet for cleaning the body. I've also used Bullet for our solid surface countertops inside the rig, not to clean, but to help protect the surface.

Thank you!!

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It's at times like this that I miss Lorna. She had a formula for a cleaning mixture approved for use on food surfaces that she used everywhere inside their vardo food cart. I'm pretty sure it included water, rubbing alcohol, a couple drops of Dawn dish detergent, and some type of mint. I remember she said the mint repels ants. Anyone else remember this more clearly than I do?

 

Linda Sand

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I am currently using a mixture of Dawn (the original) dish soap and white vinegar. It's 2 parts vinegar to 1 part dawn. Does a wonderful job in the shower removing water spots from the glass. May take a few times if it is built up, but spray on - let sit 1/2 hour and rinse off. I also used this on the coffee pot, some glassware that had lime build-up, around the faucets, sinks. I can't imaging anything it wouldn't work well on and the vinegar is a natural antiseptic. Safe for surfaces used to prepare food.

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White vinegar: non-toxic, effective, cheap. My usual cleaning solution ratio is about a cup of white vinegar to a quart of warm/hot water in a little bucket; cleans the refrigerator and sinks (use a little no-scratch Bon Ami for stubborn sink or toilet stains). White vinegar/water in a spray bottle for windows and any glass surfaces (not electronics!), woodwork, various surfaces. A couple cups of straight white vinegar left to sit for an hour or so in the toilet bowl after every few dumps. White vinegar and baking soda to "blast" the sink and shower drains; dump a half cup of baking soda in each drain, then slowly pour about a cup of white vinegar over - foaming bubbles. Repeat if necessary.

 

Simple Green (dilute solution; doesn't take much) is good for stains or really dirty stuff inside or outside the rig, e.g., awnings, floor mats, camp chairs; I suggest always rinsing, even though the product label doesn't require it.

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I found that Hydrogen Peroxide (1 bottle) with a small amt if Dawn (original) is great on all surfaces. Spray it on the tile grout,let it sit then used a small brush. Amazing how clean it came. I use it on anything. Found a spray nozzle off of a different bottle that fits the peroxide bottle

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  • 8 months later...

There are definitely products that can be problematic in an RV. Spray cleaners release a fair amount of mist which can build up in the confined space of an RV. Unless this is a toxic cleaner (of which few exist in retail stores) the mist can be eliminated by applying the cleaner to the cloth and then attacking the problem area. In small area, pour - don't spray.

 

If you can find a janitorial supply business, instead of Simple Green ask for a basic neutral pH all purpose cleaner. This will be safe on almost all surfaces, certainly all surfaces on which Simple Green is safe. It should also be cheaper per use. I owned a cleaning supply business for several years and learned that the concentrated cleaners made for "professional" use are generally more effective than their counterparts from the grocery store. A hospital grade concentrated quaternary ammonium cleaner is great for the bath and kitchen, used in proper dillutions. Having a "quat" disinfectant cleaner means refrigerator smells can be eliminated quickly, since they are mostly from bacteria. It is great in the bath, though for urine build up (by little boys or operator error) it would be best to use an enzyme cleaner made for pet urine removal. Smelly sponges are most always due to bacteria that developed when the sponge was stored wet. Fifteen minutes in a small bath of diluted quat cleaner returns the sponge to an odor free state.

 

One caution about quat cleaners, they are corrosive to metal if left on it. A fifteen minute soak won't hurt most things, but metal left wet with quat cleaner will suffer surface damage over time.

 

A janitorial supply store will also have scrubbing pads. Scrubbing pads are color coded. White is the least abrasive and black is the most abrasive (black scrubbing pads have metal embedded). As I recall the least to most abrasive are: white, red, blue, green, brown, black. Green, brown and black pads will scratch stainless steel. I keep white and blue pads on hand.

 

We are in our tenth year on the road from May 1 to early November. I travel with a neutral pH cleaner, a quat cleaner, generic window cleaner and Dawn for the dishes. The neutral cleaner is good for most jobs (including vehicles) and the quat cleaner is my weapon in bacterial prone places. Our toilets don't hold water, so there is no calcium build up requiring an acid cleaner.

 

Cleaning chemicals need dwell time. Spray and wipe is WRONG except for windows or relatively clean surfaces. Efficient cleaning is spray, let cleaner work (dwell time), agitate, wipe off cleaner and dirt. Easy unless you try to spray and wipe hardened spills or other dried-on deposits.`

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  • 2 weeks later...

We haven't found it necessary to use different cleaning supplies in the coach than those we typically use in the house. Seems like a spray bottle of window cleaner for the windows, a spray bottle of "multi-surface" cleaner for the flat surfaces, a wood care product for cleaning, conditioning, dusting the coach's cabinetry (I like the Old English aerosol stuff) and a "toss in a bucket of water" floor cleaner for the tile floors pretty much covers it for us. Staying on top of things - and always keeping the coach clean seems to sidestep the need for "heavy duty" cleaners.

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