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I have been registered for a while just lurking in the tall weeds and now we are thinking about venturing over to the "Dark Side" :-)

 

(Kinda about half way, partly, semi retired)

 

I currently tow with F350 and after a trip through the Northwest (from Texas to Seattle and back) pulling a loaded cargo trailer I have decided that this will not be enough truck to get'er done. So, in saying that I have been looking on the inter web I have located a possibility, but not sure about the super single. Are they more expensive, does it save weight, how hard is it to go back to duals. It is cummins powered, auto shift, 500K plus a few miles. I didn't know if this would be one to pursue.

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Super single are ~$900 vs $600 x 2 for duals. They do save weight. The issue is, was the truck a "true" super single truck with an extended axle or is a conversion that's harder on wheel bearings? With "our" weights it's not as critical but you need to do your homework if singling is in your future. FWIW i'm looking at a similar set-up.

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another disadvantage with super singles is you dont have as good of traction that you would have with duals

Go-forward traction is the same until you change the axle count or tire rubber compound. Stopping traction is the same until you change the tire rubber compound.

 

The only exception might be on ice: unchained duals might help you find a non-icy spot that unchained super singles didn't find, but I suspect most HDTers here have set the parking brake long before they'd be in that situation.

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Go-forward traction is the same until you change the axle count or tire rubber compound. Stopping traction is the same until you change the tire rubber compound.

 

The only exception might be on ice: unchained duals might help you find a non-icy spot that unchained super singles didn't find, but I suspect most HDTers here have set the parking brake long before they'd be in that situation.

We disagree some what. Tread pattern, tire contact patch, weight on the axle and type of surface make a difference too. Most super singles we havie seen do not have an aggressive tread pattern as that hurts fuel mileage. As such if you get on wet grass you may just sit and spin. A set of duals with a steer tire type of tread pattern will probably do the same but a set of duals with an aggressive tread pattern may be able to dig in depending on weight on the axle.

Dave

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