Jump to content

Motorhome vs Travel Trailer for Fulltiming


GypsyQueen7

Recommended Posts

Hi!

 

I'm getting ready to buy my first RV to live in full-time in an RV park for the next few years while I pay off debt and save money before hitting the road full-time! My question is, for stationary living, it seems like it would be better to get a travel trailer so I don't have to worry about the engine, etc. I won't be moving it much, in fact only if the RV park I'm planning to move to becomes a dump or starts housing drug users or something...

 

But I wondered if this is reasonable thinking because I don't have a truck to pull it, so would have to rely on a local towing company to tow it for me when needed. I did find one close by that is 24/7 emergency service, if it were needed.

 

Looking forward to any thoughts anyone might have on this!

 

Thanks!

Kirsten

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have owned both self propelled and tow-able RVs and there are good and bad factors for each. In my observation, single women tend to be more likely to pick a motorized RV when they are traveling. If you are not going to be driving it, then I'd lean strongly to some type of trailer, probably not a fifth wheel for the one level floor. They are also much easier to skirt for cold weather, even though the Portland area seldom sees much freezing weather, it would still help a lot in keeping the RV comfortable and floors reasonably warm. Part of the question is whether or not you will be thinking of a trade when it comes time to start to travel? You can buy a reasonably good trailer for much less money than one with an engine and it will have less maintenance required. There would be no need to buy a vehicle capable of towing it as long as you are not traveling as you can hire it moved if needed. Travel trailers are the lest expensive of the RV possibilities and you could keep the car that you presently have.

 

For frequent travel I happen to prefer the motorized RVs and think that most women would find them easier to travel with, but the cost is greater and the maintenance is also. A travel trailer is also the least difficult to level if you do not have a built-in leveling system and if you buy a motorized RV you probably should consider getting a leveling system.

 

Since you have no RV experience and you don't plan to travel for several years, I'd recommend buying a modest travel trailer and then planning to replace it when the time comes to go on the road.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you can find a floor plan in a travel trailer/5th wheel that you like; another thing to compare is the annual insurance and registration costs. In many states, trailers are cheaper to register than motorized vehicles. They can also be cheaper to insure since accident liability is often covered by the insurance on the tow vehicle. The difference in insurance premiums may well pay for a move if one becomes necessary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have owned both self propelled and tow-able RVs and there are good and bad factors for each. In my observation, single women tend to be more likely to pick a motorized RV when they are traveling. If you are not going to be driving it, then I'd lean strongly to some type of trailer, probably not a fifth wheel for the one level floor. They are also much easier to skirt for cold weather, even though the Portland area seldom sees much freezing weather, it would still help a lot in keeping the RV comfortable and floors reasonably warm. Part of the question is whether or not you will be thinking of a trade when it comes time to start to travel? You can buy a reasonably good trailer for much less money than one with an engine and it will have less maintenance required. There would be no need to buy a vehicle capable of towing it as long as you are not traveling as you can hire it moved if needed. Travel trailers are the lest expensive of the RV possibilities and you could keep the car that you presently have.

 

For frequent travel I happen to prefer the motorized RVs and think that most women would find them easier to travel with, but the cost is greater and the maintenance is also. A travel trailer is also the least difficult to level if you do not have a built-in leveling system and if you buy a motorized RV you probably should consider getting a leveling system.

 

Since you have no RV experience and you don't plan to travel for several years, I'd recommend buying a modest travel trailer and then planning to replace it when the time comes to go on the road.

Thank you Kirk!! You have given me so much great advice!! Price, cost of insurance, and registration, was part of why I started looking into the travel trailer option since I won't be moving around for a while. When I get ready to hit the road in about 4 years or so, I would plan on trading it in for a motorized RV.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you can find a floor plan in a travel trailer/5th wheel that you like; another thing to compare is the annual insurance and registration costs. In many states, trailers are cheaper to register than motorized vehicles. They can also be cheaper to insure since accident liability is often covered by the insurance on the tow vehicle. The difference in insurance premiums may well pay for a move if one becomes necessary.

Thanks trailertraveler! That's what occurred to me after I posted, that that would also be a lot cheaper!! :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps this ongoing discussion about this topic will answer some of your questions or raise new ones for you. No harm in asking it again, but it's been asked so many times and so frequently that about every thing that can be said about the topic has been said. Still, as I said, no harm in discussing it again.

 

http://www.rvnetwork.com/index.php?showtopic=118583&hl=

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Perhaps this ongoing discussion about this topic will answer some of your questions or raise new ones for you. No harm in asking it again, but it's been asked so many times and so frequently that about every thing that can be said about the topic has been said. Still, as I said, no harm in discussing it again.

 

http://www.rvnetwork.com/index.php?showtopic=118583&hl=

Thank you Rif! I will check out the discussion!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As someone who has done what you are talking of doing, I'll give my two cents.

 

When I got divorced in 2005 (x-wife bought my share of the house) I looked at apartments and found them to

be very expensive (this was in California)so I purchased a 2004 Terry 27 ft. TT and placed it in a park not

far from the beach for $500 a month including electricity.

 

I was still working at the time and commuting 50 miles each way so all I did was sleep there, watch some TV

and eat some of my meals. It worked for me.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As someone who has done what you are talking of doing, I'll give my two cents.

 

When I got divorced in 2005 (x-wife bought my share of the house) I looked at apartments and found them to

be very expensive (this was in California)so I purchased a 2004 Terry 27 ft. TT and placed it in a park not

far from the beach for $500 a month including electricity.

 

I was still working at the time and commuting 50 miles each way so all I did was sleep there, watch some TV

and eat some of my meals. It worked for me.

I've been slowly simplifying my life over the past 4 years, and this is just next step that will get me closer to my dream of full-timing on the road, once I get all my debt paid off, student loans being the biggest killer! I can't wait to move and go from paying $950/mth, to $400 + electric/mth! And I'll only be about 10 miles away from work. Though I keep reminding myself that there will be a transition period and will likely have moments of "what the hell did I do??" But I went through that when I moved to an artists community and lived in a small room with a bathroom, smaller than most travel trailers I've seen, and loved it except for having to share the kitchen with folks who had other ideas about what constituted clean.

 

I'm just so excited for this next step, I'm now looking at travel trailers and hope to buy in the next few weeks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Depends of what lifestyle you are going to have. First is moving every so often. Daily, weekly, monthly travel. Or are you going to sit for a seasonal stay and travel to and from. If the later then I recommend a trailer which means your daily driver is a pickup truck. Just some things to think about.

 

Good luck

Bill

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have had class C, Class A, travel trailer and 5th wheels. For rull timing and parked most of the time, the 5th wheel is the way to go. Better in cold weather and more storage.

 

But to each his own. What works for me may not work for you.

 

A motorhome is not designed to be parked for months on end.

 

Ken

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You may also want to investigate fifth wheels. They do offer much more storage and space than a pull trailer and that may be a major advantage. You can find some great buys on used ones. In case you do have to move it, there are plenty of companies that can tow it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just bought my first RV and got a Class C motorhome. I am selling my house and going to travel around with my 2 dogs. I debated between trailers and motorhomes, and chose the motorhome since I will move a lot, want to feel safe being by myself and not have to get out when stopped, and didn't want to have to back up or hook a trailer up by myself. I think it's an individual choice and what works best for you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

For us, major question is where you are going to camp. We like to boondock and get to out of the way spots so a 4x4 truck pulling a 5th wheel was the way to go. I'm fairly sure class a buses couldn't go where we like to be. We like a lot of space so we pull a 32' 5er. I had never towed anything before, never hooked up a trailer and it honestly is pretty easy. After a year on the road backing up is getting easier and I have only once failed to get into a space cos I couldn't back the rig up properly.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"I'm getting ready to buy my first RV to live in full-time in an RV park for the next few years while I pay off debt and save money before hitting the road full-time! My question is, for stationary living, it seems like it would be better to get a travel trailer so I don't have to worry about the engine, etc. I won't be moving it much, in fact only if the RV park I'm planning to move to becomes a dump or starts housing drug users or something..." The general advice is that a towable is the better choice for long-term parking and a driveable is the better choice for frequent moving.

 

My suggestion would be to find either a 5'er or TT that suits you and have it delivered and set up at your site. That way you won't have to deal with trading your current vehicle for a truck that will be able to tow the trailer once or twice.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If i had to do it all over again i would def go with a travel trailer or a 5th wheel pref a 5th wheel. and i know this from a learning experience where my engine gave me problems :angry: and my ( house was in the shop )!! now if i had a travel trailer or a 5th wheel it wouldn't have mattered because i would have still had my house :ph34r: . i'm in a class b and i just hate it now theres no storage space the bathroom is cramped for space the bed is not comfy to my liking :blink:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks David and ganto!! I've all but decided to get a 5th wheel, and have someone set it up for me. For many reasons, it really seems to be the best choice for what I will be using it for. Ganto, I like the idea of a class b, but they are super small...do you think you'll get a bigger rig soon?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks David and ganto!! I've all but decided to get a 5th wheel, and have someone set it up for me. For many reasons, it really seems to be the best choice for what I will be using it for. Ganto, I like the idea of a class b, but they are super small...do you think you'll get a bigger rig soon?yes a class

yes a class b is super small :blink: . i have been looking at bigger rigs as i'm looking to unload what i have now and move on!! i love the sprinter vans but there way over priced for what they are and with all of these new emissions standards there crap with the EGR'S failing and the NOX sensors failing and the mb mech not knowing how to fix the issues.

id'e go for a nice roomy 5th wheel and an older F350 pre emissions and do a waste vegtable oil conversion to it B)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

As someone who has done what you are talking of doing, I'll give my two cents.

 

When I got divorced in 2005 (x-wife bought my share of the house) I looked at apartments and found them to

be very expensive (this was in California)so I purchased a 2004 Terry 27 ft. TT and placed it in a park not

far from the beach for $500 a month including electricity.

 

I was still working at the time and commuting 50 miles each way so all I did was sleep there, watch some TV

and eat some of my meals. It worked for me.

Hi there Phil,

 

If you don't mind my asking, where is this holy land?!

My name is Maria and i'm 23 years old, I live in FL with my husband and we are planning on moving back to Cali for school.

I've been trying to sell my husband on a 5th wheel, but he hasn't said much. (The way I persuade him to do anything is to be

fully prepared with a reasonable plan A all the way to plan Z) I have been looking into the LA area because our school is USC,

do you by any chance know of a place near USC?

 

Thanks for your time!

-M

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

Dish For My RV.

RV Cable Grip

RV Cable Grip

All the water you need...No matter where you go

Country Thunder Iowa

Nomad Internet

Rv Share

RV Air.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

The Rvers- Now Streaming

RVTravel.com Logo



×
×
  • Create New...