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The floor project


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We're starting the new floor project in a few weeks.

We're going with this product: http://www.homedepot.com/p/TrafficMASTER-Allure-12-in-x-36-in-Ashlar-Resilient-Vinyl-Tile-Flooring-24-sq-ft-case-211713/100595258

It's a floating floor. Now I'm getting conflicting opinions regarding the installation. Some folks are telling me to glue the entire floor down, since we will be spending a fair amount of time in southern California, and the heat will cause buckling or cause the seams to separate. If I wanted to glue the floor down, I'd have chosen a sheet vinyl, not the tiles.

So, reassure me would you?

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About 4 years ago we installed this version of the Allure flooring in our TT. It's been exposed to a wide variety of temperatures and humidities over the years and we're still very happy with it. Just make sure you follow the manufacturer's installation instructions very carefully. I've encountered two problems which are both my own fault.

1) There is a slight "bump" under one spot. I tried to be very careful to sand down any "bumps" on the subfloor, make sure there were no screws or nails protruding etc. Also tried to carefully sweep the subfloor prior to laying the flooring but somehow there is something under one spot and after a couple years our foot traffic has worn off the top layer of the vinyl leaving a black spot.

2) I had a couple areas that were a real challenge along the edges. In one spot I didn't leave enough gap between the edge of the vinyl and the edge of the bed frame. Expansion and contraction of the flooring has caused the plank along the edge to pull away from the adjacent plank leaving a gap. At one other spot I had interference with my power panel such that the power panel "clamped" the plank to the subfloor preventing it from moving with expansion and contraction. Again, that plank seperated from the adjacent plank. This flooring really does need to "float" and it's very important that it has both room to expand and that nothing keeps it clamped down preventing it from moving.

 

I would use this product again - like many jobs I learn a lot the first time I do them.

 

---ron

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They say leave 1/8 gap. along the walls. I was planning on leaving 3/16, just to be on the safe side. I do worry a bit about the slide outs moving the floor though.

We're doing the bedroom in a sheet vinyl for now, we'll go back over it with something else when we don't have as many cats.

That project is slated for this summer / fall while we're in Moro Bay or Santa Maria Ca.

Brad

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How much gap can be a troubling issue in an RV. In a house you let the flooring season a bit so the moisture level and size stabilizes but in an RV you will often move from very dry to very damp situations. I'd err a bit on too much gap if I was in a dry location, stay with the standard if I was in a more moderate one or a damp situation.

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How much gap can be a troubling issue in an RV. In a house you let the flooring season a bit so the moisture level and size stabilizes but in an RV you will often move from very dry to very damp situations. I'd err a bit on too much gap if I was in a dry location, stay with the standard if I was in a more moderate one or a damp situation.

Yeah, we bounce betwixt The Great NorthWet, and the Mojave.

We planned on leaving a gap and hiding it with a nice moulding. I've this funny feeling I'll be making a whole bunch of Bull Nosed Oak in the near future. She wants a Vera wood trasition between the hall and bedroom, I'll be doing that too.

We installed a golden Teak floor in the stick house just before we sold it. I did the transitions and threshholds then also.

450 sq feet of flooring, 6 transitions and threshholds and 175 lin feet of custom cut 3/4 inch by 4 inch Cherry mouldings. I damn near cried when the new owners ripped it all out. It was less that a year old. I've not done much in the coach, it's all new to me.....

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I would guess the reason they say not to use in a "trailer" (probably meaning an RV in general) is because of the instability of the floor environment. Not only is there radical "weather" changes, and exposure to extremes (most RVs are not used year round so are not maintained in typical "house" conditions), but the platform is itself unstable. There is lots of twist in RV floors, and they are not known to be "smooth".

 

If you keep the RV at reasonable temperatures, and make SURE you repair the floor properly, AND leave a little extra space for expansion/contraction I'd say you are probably good. Based on my experience with this type of product (but not that specific one). You have to prep carefully though.

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Prep: Pull the 12 year old carpet (The previous owner had a cat and a couple dogs, the dogs did their due diligence in a few places...) Get the pad out, find and remove all staples, sweep.

Sand the floor, sweep. Fill al the holes from the staples, spot sand, sweep.

Seal the sub floor with a good quality floor sealer and after it's dry, sweep.

Lay down brown paper to locate any screws or staples we may have missed, roll the paper with a heavy roller, anything sticking up will come through the paper (A trick I learned decades ago while installing sheet flooring) sweep. Shop vac.

Cover area not being worked on with paper, pulling it back as I go. This keeps anything that may find it's way in, off the floor, another thing we did 35 years ago.

Plain brown paper, in rolls 36 inches wide is free. I used to work for a place that gives me roll ends , whenever I need them.

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Hi Bear, do you mean oak shoemolding? Not bullnose. A bullnose is used at the last board when going down to a step down.

Shoemolding is used to cover the expansion gap along the walls.

Also no need to fill staple holes, or seal the floor before installation.

Sealing the floor is not nessary, it won't seal anything, just make it look shiney.

You want to do a floating floor with a good sound deadening pad like floor muffler.

31 years in the hardwood flooring biz.

Good luck!

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I put cork down in my bathroom. Tiles were 1/8" + thick and 1'x2' outside size. 2 layers or Helmetin water based contact cement on each. Filled in any minor gaps with water based filler and rolled/brushed about 5 layers of water based Varathane or polyurethane.

 

The old tiles and most of the thinset were chiseled off and the rest of the thinset ripped up with my 4x24 Makita sander with a 20 grit belt. A small grinder was used to tackle tuff to get at spots. Tiles and thinset are about 5 lbs sq ft. Did the same with the kitchen, replaced it with 1/4 ply and 1/8" commercial grade tiles to mimic 50's style.

 

I have 250 sq ft of tile left if you like the pattern, just pay for shipping.

 

I wouldn't put cork in an area that has slideouts, the rollers will damage the tiles.

 

Roger

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We're enjoying our Trafficmaster - here's my write up and photos of the project. We did it a few months ago.

No pad as recommended by Tdevery? I'm wavering on it. On the one hand the sound deadening would be nice, on the other, I worry about the floor moving over it as the slides come in and out.

Going out to get the flooring in about two hours....

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No pad as recommended by Tdevery? I'm wavering on it. On the one hand the sound deadening would be nice, on the other, I worry about the floor moving over it as the slides come in and out.

Going out to get the flooring in about two hours....

 

I don't think Trafficmaster recommends a pad. But our situation is different as we are in a 5ver - so road noise is a non issue for us.

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I don't think Trafficmaster recommends a pad. But our situation is different as we are in a 5ver - so road noise is a non issue for us.

Went with no pad, project starts the 21st. Expect links to pictures and videos. We've brainstormed a work around for our TV stand, which is held in place at the floor end by four screws. The fix will still allow the stand to be screwed down without going through the laminate, thus it will not affect the floors movements with temperature....

As to the noise issue, we figure that with the basement, and floor insulation, noise is pretty much abated anyway.

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Wife is wondering, how do we deal with the slide out? The carpet is held down along that length by a metal transition strip, which is screwed down to the coach floor, giving the slide out something to ride over as it comes in or out.

I would assume that it also serves a dual purpose of keeping the carpet from bunching up and getting dragged up and into the coach.

My initial thought is to simply notch the plank so it fits around those screws, leaving the floor free to float, and the slide to operate as it was designed.

The floor would not get caught up by the slide.

Looking at the slide out floor, it sits up with about 1/4 inch of space between it and that metal transition piece.

If I let the floor float above the transition, the floor itself will ride over the new floor just fine. It's the rollers that worry both of us.

Any suggestions?

Just over a week to go before we start....

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  • 4 weeks later...

Project is looking good. Just saw your post, we used the same flooring in our coach, no pad, no glue as you are doing. You will like the result, going on two years and no problems and in Florida, the heat has not been a problem.

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