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How do you like RV Awning lights? I'm thinking of buying a set of solar Chinese lantern lights for our RV awning. I don't have lots of money but would like a nice RV patio area to relax in.

 

I bought the items to hang the lighting on and the spray to stop them from rusting the awning if we leave them on the awning all the time.

 

http://www.amazon.com/Chinese-Lantern-String-Lights-Multi-color/dp/B00MJ6L3NQ/ref=cm_cd_al_qh_dp_t

 

What items do you like in your RV patio area? rugs? chairs? bbq?

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If we are in a state park, National Forest, National Park or other CG in a natural setting we really dislike the campers who have to destroy the natural ambiance of the darkness with the bright lights on their awnings.

 

In an RV park with nothing but RV's and street lights all around they are fine.

 

But I guess you asking about the type of lights not my opinion of bright lights in dark areas. :)

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I'm new to RVing so any input is good. :)

 

Thank you, I'll be sure to use them with my fellow campers enjoyment in mind. :)

 

When I find some I like :)

 

When you find some fellow campers you enjoy ... ;)

 

Anyway , I just picked up an 18 foot string of white rope lights from Menards . They fit nicely in the accessory channel of the main awning tube . I leave them there as they do not effect roll up . They are powered by 110 volt and I run an extension cord up one of the awning legs . I have that cord plugged into a remote controlled outlet . I keep the switch inside the Monaco for easy access / control .

The amount of light is enough to see by , but not enough to bother even the closest neighbor . No light shines away from the coach .

 

The lights are similar to :

 

LED-Rope-Light-with-Voltage-of-12-to-230

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You want to keep the BBQ well away from the awning, the smoke often contains enough grease to be a problem after a few cooking sessions.

 

I like LED lights too, we used some small solar patio lights to light up the RV's black steps and make avoiding them with our shins easier.

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Note: PPL just ran a special this past weekend for awning LED lights for $99.00 + shipping. They looked pretty good. I would guess that there are many others available.

 

Safe Travels!

 

Dang , they aren't at all proud of those lights are they ? And then they tack on 10 dollar shipping . You could buy about ten 18 foot rope lights for that kind of money . Of course , that's not from an RV related store . laugh2.gif

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Find a really dark spot far from city lights, on a clear dry moonless night, turn off all your lights and go sit outside in the dark for an hour looking at the sky. What you see is amazing when you compare it to what most folks, most places see when they look up. Some folks will go their entire lives thinking there are a handful of stars and the sky is black, very sad.

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Find a really dark spot far from city lights, on a clear dry moonless night, turn off all your lights and go sit outside in the dark for an hour looking at the sky. What you see is amazing when you compare it to what most folks, most places see when they look up. Some folks will go their entire lives thinking there are a handful of stars and the sky is black, very sad.

 

So true, and so sad. Several years ago, my dad hosted some Boy Scouts from an inner city at our family mountain cabin (9500'). One of the boys could not figure out what he was seeing in the night sky. What he was really seeing was the Milky Way.

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I guess I should have said, being out in scenic areas at night without artificial light has great ambiance! Looking out at the country side illuminated by star light in very nice. Watching the moon come up over the hills/mountains is fantastic. Seeing the country in full moon light is wonderful.

 

Sitting in total darkness would not be fun. The only time I have been in total darkness was being in a cave with the lights off.

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  • 2 months later...

Hi Kevin and Janet. Hope you're still having fun outfitting your RV. You originally asked, "What items do you like in your RV patio area? rugs? chairs? bbq?"

 

I made an EXPENSIVE rookie mistake when I was seduced by 2 zero-gravity recliners covered in lovely, textured fabric at Camping World. Later I discovered in the fine print on the care instructions they would fade in the sun, mold when damp, and generally be hard-to-clean dirt magnets in the Rio Grande Valley wind. When they are folded up, they are big, heavy, and awkward to wrestle in and out of the fiver basement. We cart those pretty space-hogs around, but never use them. For what we paid for those first two Camping World chairs we could have purchased a new Road Trip Grill and a pair of really great usable chairs.

 

After 7 years of full-timing and looking for the most user-friendly camp chairs for our life-style, here's my criteria:

  • comfortable
  • weather-proof
  • easy to clean (hose off; dries quickly)
  • light and easy to set up, put away, or carry to campfires and potlucks at the neighbors'
  • heavy and stable enough not to easily blow over (can scratch your rig or your neighbors', plus blowing across the road ruins the chair)
  • folds flat / takes up minimal storage
  • durable; doesn't need a protective $$$ storage bag - as do our original chairs

After surveying many RV friends and observing their favorite chairs, we settled on breathable, weather-resistant mesh on a metal frame. Last summer I happened to find two great mesh chairs at Bed, Bath, and Beyond on sale for $15 each and for how we use them, they're perfect. We can leave them outside until we're ready to move. http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/hawthorne-folding-sling-chairs-set-of-2/3265152?categoryId=13268 There are many stores that sell seasonal outdoor furniture at reasonable prices. Just because the store says 'CAMPING' over the door doesn't mean everything inside is of practical value where you park your rig.

 

On the other hand, last time I was at Camping World I picked up 2 light-weight tripod chairs with backs, cup holders, and a carry strap for about $15 each. http://www.campingworld.com/shopping/item/blue-tripod-chair/74250 Now those little chairs turned out to be a great buy. We use them way more than Rock expected and they take up hardly any space at all. I take one with me on birding hikes; Rock used one for a stool while he worked on a repair project. We grabbed them to sit in when new neighbors came by to visit and we gave them our "good" chairs.

 

Hope this helps... the message isn't just about chairs.

 

Enjoy your new RV life. You'll meet so many great people. Did you get the Chinese lanterns?

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You also asked about patio rugs, which wouldn't be practical in the places we stay nor would we have room to pack one. However, we always put out a rubber textured doormat below the stairs a wire/brush boot scraper that was hard to find but is very practical. http://www.amazon.com/Rubber-Cal-Herringbone-Scraper-Brush-13-Inch/dp/B004D17T8S/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1431411798&sr=8-1&keywords=Boot+Scraper+Doormat

 

To help minimize the stuff tracked in the house in addition to the the above, the throw rug at my front door is really a plush rubber-backed bath rug that matches the rest of my carpet, but it's washable. Easy on guests with muddy feet, easy on the hostess, too. No one's the wiser.

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  • 1 month later...

These are the lights we use. Took me a while to find bulds with a low enough wattage to keep from attracting every bug for 20 mile radius. Now we love them. I think they have 7 watt bulbs in them. The picture below was with 15 watt flourescent bulbs which were like having 60 watt bulbs. It was way too bright.

 

DSCN1850_zps17f89527.jpg

 

DSCN1859_zpsd7cbf798.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...

We use 3 patio rugs when spending the winter in FL. I hate dragging into the RV the sand and bits of humus that clings to our shoes. This way we have a large area to walk around and nothing to stick to our shoes. We can even walk around barefoot. We don't use patio lights anymore because we found them annoying more than anything. We use a rope light on the ground if the site is very dark - that's about it. Under the awning we have a large plastic table from Walmart with our Icemaker and some BBQ utensils. The BBQ grill is away from the awning, usually on the picnic table the CGs supply. I also have 2 of those sheepherd's hooks for a hanging basket of flowers and a bird feeder.

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