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i may have missed it, oil sample analysis


castlewood57

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Yes, I had found that , but I was hoping to get information about percentages since the analysis had been completed and that is what paperwork I can use.

Thanks

I'm sorry. I guess I missed something here.. But then I went back and read your post over again, so I will state pretty much the obvious. Have the company who did the test for you provide the number ranges that you need. Or is this a test that was done for someone else (and you should be hoping its for this truck), so then still call the company on the analysis and get the numbers from them.

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I'm sorry. I guess I missed something here.. But then I went back and read your post over again, so I will state pretty much the obvious. Have the company who did the test for you provide the number ranges that you need. Or is this a test that was done for someone else (and you should be hoping its for this truck), so then still call the company on the analysis and get the numbers from them.

Ok, I guess I was expecting honesty, but yes now that you mention it, I don't know if the oil is specifically from the truck I am looking at, test was done for someone else ( fleet vehicle).

Thanks, maybe I'll pass on it no matter the numbers.

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Oil analysis has it's limitations, the laboratories that do them will be the first to admit it. A single sample taken from a cold engine of unknown pedigree, or even a warmed up engine during an oil change might yield some info, but will be misleading at best. The technicians who run the analysis will offer their opinion based on their experience and the conditions. They are the best interpreters of the numbers.

To really get a handle on it you need to take several samples over time under consistent conditions to really get meaningful information. Without that backround the interpretation is an guess.

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Oil analysis has it's limitations, the laboratories that do them will be the first to admit it. A single sample taken from a cold engine of unknown pedigree, or even a warmed up engine during an oil change might yield some info, but will be misleading at best. The technicians who run the analysis will offer their opinion based on their experience and the conditions. They are the best interpreters of the numbers.

To really get a handle on it you need to take several samples over time under consistent conditions to really get meaningful information. Without that backround the interpretation is an guess.

X2,

 

Good points Jeff.

 

Over a long period of time I have been around some fairly formal predictive maintenance program's....some had merit and proven "$aves"....other programs were mostly "feel good" programs.

 

Various types of engines, pumps, fans, electric motors, gearbox's were formally monitored including active vibration as well as oil.

 

Recip-engines can be tough to read with oil but over a period of time you might see trends that may be useful.

 

We leased a 550 Ton Hyd-crane and the Hyd-pump bank was well North of $1,000,000 so we monitored that rig with a Hawks Eye, it had active chip-lights and vibration sensors as well as oil monitoring and with more than 300 gallons of expensive "synthetic-eco-oil" we watched the oil reports with a keen eye and if Anything showed up we had the Pumps check fast...

 

Don't bet the farm on the oil report....one DARK FOGGY Easter night I departed Longview TX in a light twin with low time (300 Hr) custom built engines....at 6,000 feet the Left engine blew up and some parts shot out of the side of the cowling....I muttered...."oh my goodness....(or something)....what really ticked me off was that both engines had "Perfect-oil-reports) two day ago...

 

My sister had the best explanation of why the engine scattered..... punishment for working on Easter....

 

Drive on....(machinery....hard to predict)

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2 decades in IndyCar taught me that oil analysis is cheap insurance. Mobil had a lab at the track and took samples every session. Remember a blown engine could result in loss of the car or even the driver! I've seen engines blow warming up in the garage area and we pre-heat the oil & water. At $120K a pop no chances are taken & the oil company doesn't want you stuff blowing up with THEIR oil as the sponsor.

 

Heres a good article for Class 8 trucks that gives some insight. BTW, the "how you take the sample" also matters. You need to take it mid-stream on a engine that was recently running, so before things settle out or up.

http://www.landlinemag.com/Magazine/2010/May/BottomLine/Oil-analysis.aspx

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