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Narrow bridges or bridges with weight limits.


MoFro

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I will soon be starting a six month tour of the US and Canada, and will be travelling in a Winnebago Sunstar which is quite big. While I will be on the major routes quite a lot, I also intend to take it off the beaten track. So I’m a little worried about bridges or underpasses with width and weight restrictions.

 

I have a low clearance POI database, but can’t find anything for narrow bridges or bridges with weight limits. If anyone knows of any (in the US or Canada), I would be most grateful if you could post the coordinates here.

 

Many thanks.

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When in doubt it is good to have a Rand McNally Motor carriers atlas. Narrow bridges require looking ahead to make sure there is no oncoming traffic before crossing. Usually they are on more remote roads and will allow for one to wait to pass if there is oncoming traffic. Underpass width is not usually the issue except maybe in National parks. Most National Parks have vehicle limitations mentioned on the parks website. (e.g. Acadia NP, Natchez Trace NP, Glacier NP, etc)

Know your weight in tons so that you can see the sign for the limitation of the Bridge (which will be posted too late for you to turn around :wacko: ).

 

The northeast is where you run into more frequent issues with low clearance issues. The height problems are most frequently railroad bridges inside of cities.towns. So, you can plan your trip and check google maps for where the tracks cross the road.

 

Finally google searches for the city and low clearance or bridge can help to find places where there have historically been issues with Truckers.

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Welcome to the forum. Suggestions: get a friend to help you get accurate measurements of your coach (length, width, height). You want those to be absolute maximums, rather than nominal numbers. Example: our coach is nominally 104" wide, but the mirrors stick out about 15" on each side, so our real width is more like 134". Measure from the ground to the tallest point on the coach. Second, get accurate weights for each axle as you are loaded for travel. Third, SLOW DOWN. Those low bridges, narrow bridges, etc. are not always announced well in advance. As Treyandsusan said, the weight limit signs are often posted too close to the bridge for you to slow down to read them, much less stop before you get to the bridge if you are running at the speed limit.

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Thanks for all your suggestions. I have the Rand McNally atlas which is useful, but I was thinking more along the lines of a POI database or a website with a list of locations so I could make my own. Failing that, if anyone knows of a narrow bridge location I would very much appreciate it if you could share.


I keep seeing lowclearances.com being mentioned. Has anyone used their bridge height data?

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Excellent reply!

 

When in doubt it is good to have a Rand McNally Motor carriers atlas. Narrow bridges require looking ahead to make sure there is no oncoming traffic before crossing. Usually they are on more remote roads and will allow for one to wait to pass if there is oncoming traffic. Underpass width is not usually the issue except maybe in National parks. Most National Parks have vehicle limitations mentioned on the parks website. (e.g. Acadia NP, Natchez Trace NP, Glacier NP, etc)

Know your weight in tons so that you can see the sign for the limitation of the Bridge (which will be posted too late for you to turn around :wacko: ).

 

The northeast is where you run into more frequent issues with low clearance issues. The height problems are most frequently railroad bridges inside of cities.towns. So, you can plan your trip and check google maps for where the tracks cross the road.

 

Finally google searches for the city and low clearance or bridge can help to find places where there have historically been issues with Truckers.

Last year a semi-truck driver caused a bridge to collapse because she was overweight. Her response to IN state police " I saw the weight limit sign that said 10 tons, but my weight is in pounds and I don't know how to convert the figures". A Rand McNally truckers road atlas would have shown her the information.

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