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Interstate 10 and 45 Height Restrictions


brunsje

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Thee are a few interstate overpasses in Houston that are listed as 13"6. We had a load hit a bridge marked as 14' two years ago with a load the driver swore was only 13'8". Turns out when the contractor repaved the road, he forgot to change the sign :) OOPS.

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This sounds like a great ESCAPEES PROJECT. To spot check some the signs across the country. I would guess that many could be wrong because of repaving projects.

It would also make a great article in the club magazine about how often State Road Departments check the measurements and change the signs. Or even AAA data on the number and types of accidents across the country.

 

Safe Travels!

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I'm just guessing but I'm pretty sure I've been through there at 14' even sometime in the last 20 years, and didn't hit anything, but of course that doesn't account for paving mishaps. Frankly, Texas is so reliably open that I've probably been a little sloppy about watching.. On reflection, as paranoid as I am, not a chance..

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I was just outside Houston today in the AM fueling at a Love's.

 

Asked 2 Truck Drivers and they both said there is a 13'6" limit on I10 under the 45 exchange.

 

Also said that 610 North bypass is 'usually' quicker.

 

I drove the 610 Bypass and it was always moving at 50mph.

 

JohnnyB

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  • 2 weeks later...

Thee are a few interstate overpasses in Houston that are listed as 13"6. We had a load hit a bridge marked as 14' two years ago with a load the driver swore was only 13'8". Turns out when the contractor repaved the road, he forgot to change the sign :) OOPS.

I have a dumb question, who pays for the damage for both the bridge and the vehicle when this happens?

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I no longer drive through the Houston area. First, it is a nightmare at times. Second, the roads tend to be terrible. And third - and most important to me - it is one of the few places in the country that I KNOW that there are DOT officers, specifically targeting and stopping RV's, and checking specifically for overlength. And I do not mean Big5er. So I simply bypass.....

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Usually the trucker (insurance) pays. UNLESS he can prove he was legal and not oversize as above. I have an interesting railroad bridge locally where a state highway dips down under the bridge. 13'9" clearance--usually fine. UNLESS you are using a 53' flatbed with a HI-Hoe on it where the high point of the boom just happens to be 13'8" tall at the exact center between the front and rear tandems. In which case the arc of the road under the bridge will momentarily raise the boom height to about 14'--- and "BANG".

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You are not going to hurt a bridge with the toys we pull. Good luck collecting

from a contractor working for the DOT, almost hopeless, I am sure they did exactly what they were told to do.

 

TXDOT-damaged-bridge-300x224.jpg

I would think the responsible party order flows down hill, i.e., DOT, or whatever agency that maintains the road in question, would be the responsible to pay then they take action against the contractor who did the work for them, etc...?

 

I would also suspect our insurance would cover up front, especially if the signage is wrong, and they would go after the "responsible party".

 

But then what one hopes or suspects may not work out in real life :(

 

Too bad someone hasn't built a special laser range finder that could measure distance and height to a bridge. :rolleyes:

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I would also suspect our insurance would cover up front, especially if the signage is wrong, and they would go after the "responsible party".

If the load is taller than the overpass (as it is marked) or more than 14ft, the shipping company is ALWAYS at fault. Says so right there on their permit. Just like Jeff said, due to the curve of the road it caused his load height to increase, but the bridge was 13'9 over the roadway that was under it. Shorter trailer might have made it, who's fault is it? The bridge is marked correctly so lets blame the.....TRUCK DRIVER!! :). On rare occasion you may find a contractor who messed up, but in all the ones I have seen, that has been real rare.

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