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Review Fuses: ANL vs. Class T vs. MEGA vs. ?


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Would appreciate if any of you electrical gurus would review the above fuses as to appropriate situation to use each fuse, advantages/disadvantages of each.  Specifically in inverter, generator, solar applications.

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The sole purpose of any fuse is to guard against over current.  All of the above will accomplish that.  What begins to make a difference in fuses is the time it takes to open when an over current condition occurs.  Thus, we have both fast acting, slo-blow and some in between.  Secondary is location (inside, outside, wet, dry, ambient temperature, ease of replacement, etc.)  I personally do not see any need to go beyond an ANL or possibly a Mega fuse with a weather tight cover for anything on our trucks or trailers.  Each are inexpensive and easy to replace.  Now, if I were supplying high current power at a voltage much greater than our 13-14 volts to sensitive medical equipment I would be more particular about selecting a fuse type - most likely a class T or better.  You may find the Class T too fast acting for battery to inverter protection where you are often maxing to the surge current.   Bottom line - buy which ever fuse type gives you the most comfort for a restful nights sleep.  All of my "big" fuses are ANL, which typically act faster than a "Mega" fuse but slower than a "T".

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21 minutes ago, RandyA said:

The sole purpose of any fuse is to guard against over current.  All of the above will accomplish that.  What begins to make a difference in fuses is the time it takes to open when an over current condition occurs.  Thus, we have both fast acting, slo-blow and some in between.  Secondary is location (inside, outside, wet, dry, ambient temperature, ease of replacement, etc.)  I personally do not see any need to go beyond an ANL or possibly a Mega fuse with a weather tight cover for anything on our trucks or trailers.  Each are inexpensive and easy to replace.  Now, if I were supplying high current power at a voltage much greater than our 13-14 volts to sensitive medical equipment I would be more particular about selecting a fuse type - most likely a class T or better.  You may find the Class T too fast acting for battery to inverter protection where you are often maxing to the surge current.   Bottom line - buy which ever fuse type gives you the most comfort for a restful nights sleep.  All of my "big" fuses are ANL, which typically act faster than a "Mega" fuse but slower than a "T".

Thanks Randy.  I was hoping you would jump in because you give great explanations.  Wish I had known this 10 years ago because I put  a class T in my inverter line and if I recall it was pretty pricey.

2006 Volvo 780 "Hoss" Volvo D12, 465hp, 1650 ft/lbs tq., ultrashift

Bed Build by "JW Morgan's Custom Welding"

2017 DRV 39DBRS3

2013 Smart Passion Coupe "Itty Bitty"

 

"Don't go around saying the world owes you a living. The world owes you nothing. It was here first!"

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22 minutes ago, DesertMiner said:

What type of fuse does the inverter manufacture recommend? That’s usually a good place to start.

I always start with what the manufacturer recommends.  For example, straight from the Magnum 3012 Inverter owners manual:  "If a fuse is used as an overcurrent device, a Class-T type or equivalent is highly recommended."  They go on to recommend the fuse size be 400A.

Victron, on the other hand, is less specific.  They simply state (for a 12 volt 3000 watt multiplus):  "Recommended DC Fuse - 400A" and (for a 24 volt 3000 watt multiplus):  "Recommended DC Fuse - 300A"

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