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Watts water pressure gauge questions


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We are traveling for a few months and I need to either validate or change my understanding of what my water pressure gauge is telling me.

My gauge is hooked to the water inlet on the trailer and I then hook the fresh water hose to the gauge then to the fresh water spigot. When I turn the water on at the spigot I have always assumed that the displayed pressure is the pressure in the park.

I then turn a faucet in the trailer on and watch what the pressure guage says is going into the water system and adjust to 55-60 psi. The reason I ask is that this park has signs that indicate that pressure can exceed 110 lbs.

 

So the two questions are:

Is the pressure displayed on the gauge with all faucets off the source pressure? (105)

 

Is the pressure displayed on the gauge when the faucet is on the true pressure into my trailer? (58)

 

Thanks

Tim & Cheryl
2015 Mobile Suites 39 TKSB3
2009 Volvo 670 D13 I-Shift  “Walter”

Happily Living Somewhere In Nevada
 

 

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The pressure on the gauge is what it is set for. It should go on the faucet to also protect the hose. Set it once & forget it.

Ron

Thanks Ron,

 

I have my gauge inside the trailer, I don't' want someone to borrow my $100 pressure gauge on the water post.. I really don't care about my outside hose. I know I do not need to constantly change the setting, my question is the two readings. One when all faucets closed the other when one faucet opened.

Tim & Cheryl
2015 Mobile Suites 39 TKSB3
2009 Volvo 670 D13 I-Shift  “Walter”

Happily Living Somewhere In Nevada
 

 

649EF470-4F2A-4D47-8AB9-AFD3462E24F4.jpeg

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When you hook a gauge directly off the supply,(source), and open the supply valve you are seeing the supply line pressure.

 

I then turn a faucet in the trailer on and watch what the pressure guage says is going into the water system and adjust to 55-60 psi.

I think you have to much head pressure on your RV lines, they are poly flow hose with crimp type connections and they can split and separate with house pressures. I maintain my RV water pressure at 40 to 45 psi. Before you open any RV supply valves you need to make sure that your regulator is working by readjusting it up and down in pressure. The reason is that these regulator valves are typically not that reliable and the spring inside can corrode with calcium and give a false reading.

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Thanks Ron,

 

I have my gauge inside the trailer, I don't' want someone to borrow my $100 pressure gauge on the water post.. I really don't care about my outside hose. I know I do not need to constantly change the setting, my question is the two readings. One when all faucets closed the other when one faucet opened.

 

Most folks wouldn't have a clue what that thing is hanging on the spigot . And , how many of those hoses will you go through before you eat that 100 bucks ? ;)

 

We've had our Watts regulator hanging on a park faucet for the last 5 years .

Goes around , comes around .

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When you hook a gauge directly off the supply,(source), and open the supply valve you are seeing the supply line pressure.

 

I then turn a faucet in the trailer on and watch what the pressure guage says is going into the water system and adjust to 55-60 psi.

I think you have to much head pressure on your RV lines, they are poly flow hose with crimp type connections and they can split and separate with house pressures. I maintain my RV water pressure at 40 to 45 psi. Before you open any RV supply valves you need to make sure that your regulator is working by readjusting it up and down in pressure. The reason is that these regulator valves are typically not that reliable and the spring inside can corrode with calcium and give a false reading.

Thanks so much for confirming the different readings and what they are measuring. It made sense to me but confirming with someone else makes me feel better.

I thought my trailer had a pressure max of around 100 psi. I figured 58 was fine. I will recheck with the manufacturer. If 58 is to much I will back down a little.

Tim & Cheryl
2015 Mobile Suites 39 TKSB3
2009 Volvo 670 D13 I-Shift  “Walter”

Happily Living Somewhere In Nevada
 

 

649EF470-4F2A-4D47-8AB9-AFD3462E24F4.jpeg

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Most folks wouldn't have a clue what that thing is hanging on the spigot . And , how many of those hoses will you go through before you eat that 100 bucks ? ;)

 

We've had our Watts regulator hanging on a park faucet for the last 5 years .

 

I bought the RV Water Filter Store hoses that are rated at 200 psi. I doubt 100 lbs will cause a problem. I. Will keep my gauge on the inside, no downside I can see. Better safe than sorry.

Tim & Cheryl
2015 Mobile Suites 39 TKSB3
2009 Volvo 670 D13 I-Shift  “Walter”

Happily Living Somewhere In Nevada
 

 

649EF470-4F2A-4D47-8AB9-AFD3462E24F4.jpeg

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Bill B (and others) provided good information.

 

The pressure at the hose bib without water flowing is the *static* water pressure.

 

Typically the water system supplying the park may be (as you indicate) 110 psi.

Believe it.

 

When there is lots of use (water flowing) within the system, the pressure will drop (*residual* water pressure).

If the park is on a city or county water system, there may be LOTS of users - lower pressure during daytime. You check the *110* psi park system when you pull in to hook up at 11AM - and it's 80 psi.

 

The increase in volume (by the users) has resulted in a drop in pressure.

At night-time when demand decreases, pressure goes back up.

 

 

If your regulator is set at the pressure *you* desire, any quality regulator should reasonably maintain that pressure - give or take a few psi.

 

As another poster indicated, 40-45 psi would be a good setting, and any quality regulator should provide adequate volume for your needs.

 

Not sure of your terminology when you say your "gauge" (and regulator?) is *inside* your RV.

Does that mean the water connection is inside a compartment?

 

I'm with the other posters who have their regulator outside - either at the hose bib (the park's supply) - or at the exterior water inlet (connection) to the RV.

 

IMO (Murphy's also) - if your regulator is genuinely *inside* your RV - I would be shutting down the supply at night - or when I was away from the RV.

 

Inside water leaks are no fun - and will make you wish Mr. Watts was *outside* & doing his job!

 

.

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Most folks wouldn't have a clue what that thing is hanging on the spigot . And , how many of those hoses will you go through before you eat that 100 bucks ? ;)

 

We've had our Watts regulator hanging on a park faucet for the last 5 years .

 

I have a Watts 263A and it hasn't walked off in 5 1/2 years of full time use. I used one supply hose for almost 4 years until it finally gave up. I have an EMS PT50C outside also and it likes staying with me also. No issues with either walking on down the road.

 

I spend approx 8-9 months/year hosting so lot of campers are around my rig.

Ed

KM4STL

2006 GMC 2500HD CCSB 4x4 Duramax/Allison, Titan 52 gallon fuel tank, Prodigy Controller, B&W Companion Hitch
2010 Jayco Designer 35RLTS, RV Flex Armor Roof

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I too use a water pressure regulator at every stop and have done so for more than 20 years. The only time I ever lost my pressure regulator was once when some fool hooked up my RV for travel and left that regulator on the park's hydrant! There is good reason for putting the regulator on the hydrant because if you do not, you subject your hose and any filters to the excessive pressures at parks where such is the case. I have seen two different instants of a white hose splitting from the pressure, one of them with a regulator at the entry to the RV. The alternative would be to get some potable grade hose that has a high pressure rating and those are available.

 

As others have stated, all of the adjustable regulators that I have seen with a gauge on them show the down-stream pressure and are there to assist in adjusting the output. That should be done with all faucets closed because the static pressure is what your RV is exposed to most of the time since you only run water for short periods. It is quite normal to experience a pressure drop inside when you open a faucet since the RV water lines are smaller than the hose and so they do have a pressure lowering effect but as long is that stays above 35# you will see little effect of it in your shower, particularly if you use one of the better shower heads or the standard RV head with a flow restrictor. The better shower heads are designed to give a good shower while using less water and that also means less pressure drop while in use.

 

Because I like to know what the park's supply water pressure is, I keep an extra gauge like this connected to the input side.

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Good travelin !...............Kirk

Full-time 11+ years...... Now seasonal travelers.
Kirk & Pam's Great RV Adventure

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