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Rear View Camera Cable Routing


Kevin H

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I am installing a rear-view camera on the back of my Montana. I want to conceal the cable as much as possible.


Does anyone know if the fiberglass end cap has insulation or other obstructions preventing me from snaking the cable inside the cap? I'm thinking of drilling a hole in the cap so the cable runs inside and down to the underside. I'll then run it along the underside to the front and up to the hitch opening.


Any thoughts or suggestions are appreciated.

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The first time I ran a rear camera cable under my Class A I didn't protect the camera wire. So over the course of a year, some road debris probably hit the cable because the camera stopped working.

 

The second time I ran the cable, I sheathed it.

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I gave up routing the wiring inside. Ran 1/2" plastic conduit along the bottom. It can be bent using heat. Goes up thru the back cap, I mounted it INSIDE the back window. Works fine.

If I ever had a trailer made, I'd specify 2" conduit along the frame front to back & all wires would be in there, taillites, etc.

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I mounted my camera inside the fifth wheel. I ran the cable from the hitch pin (under the nose sheeting) to along the frame then drilled a hole up into the back basement storage. From there it went through the vent up the inside window frame. The camera is mounted to the top of the window frame and is out of view behind the valence. This works OK, sometimes I get a reflection from the window into the camera, especially at night. I just could not bring myself to drilling a hole into the rear cap, just me.

 

Greg

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Kevin:

 

I did exactly what you are wanting to do. I have a large window on the rear and the fiberglass rear cap. I have a different brand trailer but I imagine they are about the same. I drilled a hole above the window where I wanted to mount the camera big enough to accommodate the fitting on the end of the cable that screws onto the camera. I then removed the far left marker light and one of my tail lights about straight down from the marker light. I then used a stiff wire with a string in a small "U" on the end of the wire and pushed it as far as I could toward the marker light hole. I then used another piece of stiff wire going in at the marker light to hook the string. I then pulled enough string through the marker light hole that would be plenty long to reach down under the cap at the bottom. I then used a wire going in at the tail light hole, reaching up to the marker light and grabbing the string and pulling it down. I then drilled a hole in the bottom of the cap next to the frame where I wanted to take the cable forward on the outside of the frame, again big enough to let the fitting on the end of the cable go through the hole. I then fed a wire up through the hole in the bottom of the cap to the tail light and pulled the string down through the bottom of the cap. I then tied the string onto the end of the cable, taped it so it was a smooth tapered connection so it would not catch on anything and then pulled the cable through.

 

When you start pulling the cable into the cap you will need someone to assist you on a step ladder. One pulling on the string(not too hard) and the other feeding the cable up from the tail light hole. You may run into some fiberglass insulation during this step by step process. Curve your stiff pull wires so they hug the rear of the cap. This will let you miss most of the insulation. You may have to pull your stiff wire out and start over a few times but with a little patience you will get it done. I drilled some small holes about every 2-3 feet in the outside lip of the frame and fastened the cable with small cable ties. I was able to come up with a hole under the head of my bed, inside the front closet floor and then down into the pin box so I could tie the camera cable onto the 7 pin cable to the truck. I used an extension cable on the trailer and the shorter cable on the truck. That way I could plug and unplug the camera cable at the connection beside my 7 pin receptacle.

 

Good luck with your installation. Don

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Have you considered a wireless bu camera and repeater? You can't be longer than a semi-tractor trailer and systems are made for their length.

 

There have been endless discussions on this. I'm not going to recommend brands/models but I do know there is a growing consensus not to bother with anything analog anymore. But, you will find digital is not cheap.

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Kevin:

 

I did exactly what you are wanting to do. I have a large window on the rear and the fiberglass rear cap. I have a different brand trailer but I imagine they are about the same. I drilled a hole above the window where I wanted to mount the camera big enough to accommodate the fitting on the end of the cable that screws onto the camera. I then removed the far left marker light and one of my tail lights about straight down from the marker light. I then used a stiff wire with a string in a small "U" on the end of the wire and pushed it as far as I could toward the marker light hole. I then used another piece of stiff wire going in at the marker light to hook the string. I then pulled enough string through the marker light hole that would be plenty long to reach down under the cap at the bottom. I then used a wire going in at the tail light hole, reaching up to the marker light and grabbing the string and pulling it down. I then drilled a hole in the bottom of the cap next to the frame where I wanted to take the cable forward on the outside of the frame, again big enough to let the fitting on the end of the cable go through the hole. I then fed a wire up through the hole in the bottom of the cap to the tail light and pulled the string down through the bottom of the cap. I then tied the string onto the end of the cable, taped it so it was a smooth tapered connection so it would not catch on anything and then pulled the cable through.

 

When you start pulling the cable into the cap you will need someone to assist you on a step ladder. One pulling on the string(not too hard) and the other feeding the cable up from the tail light hole. You may run into some fiberglass insulation during this step by step process. Curve your stiff pull wires so they hug the rear of the cap. This will let you miss most of the insulation. You may have to pull your stiff wire out and start over a few times but with a little patience you will get it done. I drilled some small holes about every 2-3 feet in the outside lip of the frame and fastened the cable with small cable ties. I was able to come up with a hole under the head of my bed, inside the front closet floor and then down into the pin box so I could tie the camera cable onto the 7 pin cable to the truck. I used an extension cable on the trailer and the shorter cable on the truck. That way I could plug and unplug the camera cable at the connection beside my 7 pin .

Good luck with your installation. Don

 

 

X2...... This is exactly what I did as well. It wasnt dificult. I even managed to do it by myself.

 

I would stay away from wireless....not reliable enough.

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First 5th wheel ran the cable for the rear view camera into a connector our grandson put in the frame. This time since we have 1420 W of solar, he figured we did not need the 12 V power pin in the 7-pin receptacle and just used that pin to run the signal to the screen. This means that we only have to connect the umbilical cord and we have the video. It works great.

Reed and Elaine

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First 5th wheel ran the cable for the rear view camera into a connector our grandson put in the frame. This time since we have 1420 W of solar, he figured we did not need the 12 V power pin in the 7-pin receptacle and just used that pin to run the signal to the screen. This means that we only have to connect the umbilical cord and we have the video. It works great.

Reed and Elaine

I do something similar to get the signal into the truck. I run a separate 7-way umbilical to the truck. I have three cameras on the trailer, so I need more wires than Reed. There are three video wires (no sound) a ground and a 12-volt "ignition on" signal wire bridging the truck/trailer. The signal wire is tied to a relay in the trailer and powers the cameras on the trailer when the truck is on - power is supplied locally from the trailer batteries. It is tied to truck ignition, but it could be tied to just 12-volt power.

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Just ordered one of these:

 

http://www.rearviewsafety.com/products/wireless-systems/wifi-backup-camera-system.html

 

Makes it's own WIFI signal. Since I already have a mini iPad on a mount in the truck don't need a screen..... I will report back in a separate thread on the results after I install it. The company guaranteed 70 feet, if it doesn't work there's a booster antenna that goes on the transmitter.

 

We'll see. If it works it's the lowest cost/easiest solution to the problem.

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