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Recommendations needed for rock guard to protect my toad. I drive 27qb Coachman Freelander. I have suffered two broken windshields. 

Thanks in advance for suggestions.

Maggie

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Thank you Kirk.

Do the guards that hang under the back of the rv work? I’ve seen the ones that look like a solid piece of rubber and also the ones that are strips hanging down. I would like to find something that is installed once and left. 

I tried to attach a picture of each but the program won’t allow it. 

Thanks again,

Maggie

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The full width flaps at the back of motorhomes have a tendency to do just what you don't want to happen, they can kick up gravel and other road debris onto your toad. They're less of a problem if they're mounted high enough off the road, but standard wheel flaps serve a better purpose. My personal preference is the Protect-A-Tow that has served us well for about 10 years now. The Protect-A-Tow also protects the tow bar and wiring that the front mounted guards do not.

http://protectatow.com/

Edited by Dutch_12078
typo

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Thank you Dutch! I am so grateful for your information as I was looking at the type that is permanent. I will check out the link. Thanks again. 

Maggie

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3 hours ago, Dutch_12078 said:

The full width flaps at the back of motorhomes have a tendency to do just what you don't want to happen, they can kick up gravel and other road debris onto your toad. They're less of a problem if they're mounted high enough off the road, but standard wheel flaps serve a better purpose.

This is what we found.  Just get good flaps for behind the wheels.  On our Alaska trip we saw owners actually removing their full across-the-rear flap because it was throwing rocks. We witnessed a layer of big rock at the base of their towed vehicle's windshield.  We had just driven the same stretch of gravel & we received no rock damage.  We just had the wheel flaps.  Another hint is to lower your speed in those kinds of areas, especially when an oncoming vehicle approaches.  Get to the right as far as you can and sometimes we even had time to stop completely because no one was behind us.  Also, if you're following a semi or any kind of heavy duty truck, keep your distance behind it.  Concrete and gravel trucks load up in gravel areas so small stones can get lodged in their tires and when they get going on the highway they can get dislodged and toss it at you.  Sometimes, there's nothing you can do for a cracked windshield, unfortunately.

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35 minutes ago, 2gypsies said:

This is what we found.  Just get good flaps for behind the wheels.  On our Alaska trip we saw owners actually removing their full across-the-rear flap because it was throwing rocks. We witnessed a layer of big rock at the base of their towed vehicle's windshield.  We had just driven the same stretch of gravel & we received no rock damage.  We just had the wheel flaps.  Another hint is to lower your speed in those kinds of areas, especially when an oncoming vehicle approaches.  Get to the right as far as you can and sometimes we even had time to stop completely because no one was behind us.  Also, if you're following a semi or any kind of heavy duty truck, keep your distance behind it.  Concrete and gravel trucks load up in gravel areas so small stones can get lodged in their tires and when they get going on the highway they can get dislodged and toss it at you.  Sometimes, there's nothing you can do for a cracked windshield, unfortunately.

Thanks 2gypsies. I love the Escappee feedback. The most knowledgeable group of people out there! 

Thanks again,

Maggie

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5 hours ago, maggie blair said:

I was looking at the type that is permanent. I will check out the link.

The Protect-a-tow is probably the one that I too would buy but you need to understand that it isn't permanent but must be installed as part of the hook-up. I have used the mud flaps at the very back and also those directly behind the rear wheels. I strongly recommend that you have those behind the wheels but they are not a total answer. I used the Blue Ox Kargard that mounts to the Blue Ox baseplate and found it easier to use than the skirts like the Protect-a-tow, but they are slightly less effective. The question is one of what is most important. 

Edited by Kirk W

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56 minutes ago, Kirk W said:

The Protect-a-tow is probably the one that I too would buy but you need to understand that it isn't permanent but must be installed as part of the hook-up. I have used the mud flaps at the very back and also those directly behind the rear wheels. I strongly recommend that you have those behind the wheels but they are not a total answer. I used the Blue Ox Kargard that mounts to the Blue Ox baseplate and found it easier to use than the skirts like the Protect-a-tow, but they are slightly less effective. The question is one of what is most important. 

Thanks again Kirk. The most important thing is stop the rocks from flying up and breaking my windshield. I’d rather have something permanent but I have to be logical and get whatever works the best for my problem. 

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Hooking up the Protect-A-Tow only adds about 30-40 seconds to our routine. When we unhook, we leave the PAT attached to the motorhome and just roll it up, securing it under the bumper with a couple of small bungee cords. Hooking up just involves unrolling it and clipping two hooks to the eyes installed on the toad, plus passing the center support rod through the center loop and clipping it on each side.

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Kargard II

12 hours ago, Dutch_12078 said:

Hooking up the Protect-A-Tow only adds about 30-40 seconds to our routine.

With practice, neither of the two requires a lot of time to install but both do have some degree of learning curve. We used the Kargard and found it very easy to use and those for other brands of towbar would be similar. I have observed many different setups and in my opinion, the Kargard type is easier to install but take more space to store. The Protect-a-tow and other devices like it are probably the most effective, but they are also great fun when wet after travel! If you are only concerned about the windshield, much less expensive is the Camco windshield protector.

shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcT0NHRfxgbEA7LyU22SG

But these do nothing to protect the front of the car from rock chips, which was the issue we had to cause us to go to the Kargard. Once we started to use the Kargard we had no rock chips on paint or glass. 

If you use a Roadmaster tow-bar, they also make and sell both types of rock guards for their towing equipment so you may want to look at those as well. Roadmaster Defender         Roadmaster Guardian

I would strongly suggest that you look at more than one product before you choose as they are not all the same in cost or performance. Talk with those who own and have used the various products since we all tend to think the product that we use is best if we are happy with it. If you have Blue Ox towing equipment, they too make one of the skirt types of protective devices.  Kargard II

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There's not much of a "learning curve" to hooking two clips to two eye bolts and clipping on a support rod. That's what it takes to hook up our Protect-A-tow. "Great fun" after wet travel? Yep, sometimes my hands get wet rolling the PAT up in the rain. Of course they also get wet unhooking the tow bar, safety cables, and wiring. ;)

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2 hours ago, Kirk W said:

Kargard II

With practice, neither of the two requires a lot of time to install but both do have some degree of learning curve. We used the Kargard and found it very easy to use and those for other brands of towbar would be similar. I have observed many different setups and in my opinion, the Kargard type is easier to install but take more space to store. The Protect-a-tow and other devices like it are probably the most effective, but they are also great fun when wet after travel! If you are only concerned about the windshield, much less expensive is the Camco windshield protector.

shopping?q=tbn:ANd9GcT0NHRfxgbEA7LyU22SG

But these do nothing to protect the front of the car from rock chips, which was the issue we had to cause us to go to the Kargard. Once we started to use the Kargard we had no rock chips on paint or glass. 

If you use a Roadmaster tow-bar, they also make and sell both types of rock guards for their towing equipment so you may want to look at those as well. Roadmaster Defender         Roadmaster Guardian

I would strongly suggest that you look at more than one product before you choose as they are not all the same in cost or performance. Talk with those who own and have used the various products since we all tend to think the product that we use is best if we are happy with it. If you have Blue Ox towing equipment, they too make one of the skirt types of protective devices.  Kargard II

The windshield guard is exactly what I need. My car is already pretty scratched up so I'm not to Concerned about the paint. I do have the Blue Ox setup.  Thanks so much! 

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Note that the Roadmaster Defender and the no longer made Kargard II do not protect the tow bar and wires. The Protect-A-Tow does, as well as being lower cost.

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