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Alice

Future Full Timers - We think?

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Hello everyone.  I guess this “Getting Started” section is the place to get started. J  I’m Alice and my husband is Jim and we’re currently NOT RV’ers.  We are in our 50’s and looking at retirement and I guess I’ll try to make a long story short.  We hate our house.  We dream of travel.  We can’t pay for our hated house (or any house) and comfortably travel at the same time.   So comes “the plan”.

  We’re both eligible for full retirement next year but if we work past it we get a lump-sum payment which can be substantial, depending on how long we work and what retirement plan we choose.  I expect we’ll net, between the two of us, sufficient funds to pay all our debts off and enable us to put away a year’s living expenses. We can then sell our house, trade in our two vehicles (sadly, his pickup is just not going to do the trick – too small) and buy a decent travel trailer and tow vehicle.  Then we hope to full-time in a TT for the next year or two, just bopping around and seeing America.  We own a piece of (currently) undeveloped land and an off-the-grid cabin which we want to have a well dug for an electric run to, where we can land if we stop wanting wheels under us for a while, but really, that’s more for husband for deer hunting season than anything else.  I guess that means we’ll be swinging back through here for a month or two each fall. 

Now, here’s where the plan starts floundering.  We’ve been looking at TT’s and reading and researching and while we’ve found some TT we’re fond of, the more I read the more I wonder if it’s even realistic to full-time in one.  I just read somewhere on this site where people were saying to plan on 1,500 lbs of stuff, each, for full-time.  Heck, I didn’t think we’d top 1,000 lbs together for clothes and food and kitchen stuff and you know…things.   We’re looking at no more than 30’ and I’d like to keep it under that, but we have a few “musts”.  1) A walk around queen bed.  2) A decently sized bathroom. 3) An oven.   

We love the floor plan of the Forest River Cherokee Grey Wolf 25RL.  No slides, decent kitchen, big bath and a bedroom with a door!  The 23MH I believe is the same thing…but with a dining slide.  (I have a thing about slides.  I worry they're one more thing to go wrong, you can't use them while they're not extended, etc. etc., but I'm not against them entirely.)  I haven’t found that floor plan or anything close in anything but Forest River brands.  BUT, does Forest River have decent quality?  Can we realistically live in something like this full-time?  We’re not worried about being too crowded and always in each other’s space…that’s not really the problem.  We like each other lots. LOL!  But will a TT physically take it?  Especially a lower-cost one? 

Then, there’s the part that makes this seem more fantasy than dream.  We have literally no experience with TTs.  Never pulled one with a truck.  Never slept in one except as kids because both of our parents had them.  I keep watching videos and really, I’m starting to wonder if this is way more complicated than it was supposed to be.  We’ve considered other types of RV’s, but motorhomes just don’t have the space unless we go much larger than we want to and they’re so expensive!  And we’d have to have a second vehicle too…so buying a more expensive RV and another vehicle just doesn’t seem reasonable.  Not like we have any experience with motorhomes either. 

Gee, I don’t even know what I’m asking here.  I guess, is full-time in a TT a reasonable thought?  How do we prepare?  Any suggestions on quality TT that might have the 3 “musts”?  We have plenty of time to decide on the route we’re going…but we’d like to be headed in the right direction for planning that route.  Can anyone give me any pointers?

Edited by Alice

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First of all, welcome to the Escapee forums! We are happy to have you here and we will do all that we are able to assist forums! you and to support your move to the RV lifestyle. 

48 minutes ago, Alice said:

I guess, is full-time in a TT a reasonable thought?

Absolutely it is. While there are more folks doing so in fifth wheel trailers and motorhomes than in travel trailers, it can and is being done in travel trailers as well. We have friends who completed 16 full years living in one. The one that they lived in most of that time was actually 33' long but there are those in smaller. It is impossible for us to say for sure that you can adapt to a 30' travel trailer or any other RV for that matter, but we know that it is possible. The RV lifestyle is quite different than any other that I am aware of and not everyone who attempts it can make the adjustments, but since you are starting early and planning ahead you have a much higher chance of success. Pretty much everyone that you are likely to hear from on these forums will be positive because those who do not find it working do not stay around to tell their reasons why not. 

I suggest that since you have some time, spend a lot of time visiting the websites and blogs that can be found in the signatures of those who post here as many of us have sites to tell our story. I would invite you to start with mine, as found below my signature on this post.

57 minutes ago, Alice said:

I expect we’ll net, between the two of us, sufficient funds to pay all our debts off and enable us to put away a year’s living expenses.

Planning finances are, in my opinion, the most important part of the change of lifestyle. I suggest that you need to plan to live on your continuing income and not on savings but keep that year of expenses as a monetary reserve in case of problems. I'd also try not to spend all of the proceeds of your home on the RV & truck as you need to have some sort of preparation for the day that you must stop traveling, even if that should turn out to be many years. Pam & I were on the road for 12 years of a planned 15 when health issues made things difficult and that preplanning allowed us to buy another place for our present home-base as we now travel part-time. 

1 hour ago, Alice said:

BUT, does Forest River have decent quality? 

That is a difficult question to answer. I can easily tell you that it is not of the highest quality of construction and finish of any trailers out there. While these are not the only measure, higher quality RVs will always cost and weigh more. As the price drops, there have to be concessions and materials used and the skills of the workers are early on that list of cuts. There are people who do live in RVs of lower price/quality but doing so will mean it will show wear more quickly and probably will require more in maintenance. If you only spend two years in it and then stop, you probably could manage in a recent model from Forest River but if you were to move up to one of the best-built travel trailers you could live in it for many years, even if you were to park it permanently. If you have good skills a lot of the maintenance and repairs needed can be done by the owners. 

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1 hour ago, Alice said:

We are in our 50’s and looking at retirement . . .

What will you be doing for health insurance?

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6 minutes ago, Kirk Wood said:

suggest that you need to plan to live on your continuing income and not on savings but keep that year of expenses as a monetary reserve in case of problems

Oh yes.  I didn't plan to live on the savings - that would be emergency money...say...the trailer is in the shop and we have to get a short-term lease, or we have to fly home because of a family member, etc.  We'll both have decent lifetime retirement income.  We won't be rich by any means, it'll be the equivalent to us living off one of our salaries instead of two, but it should be plenty for daily living expenses and hopefully to save from that as well.  That's why we'll work to get that lump-sum payment to pay off any credit cards and debts. 

19 minutes ago, Kirk Wood said:

If you only spend two years in it and then stop, you probably could manage in a recent model from Forest River but if you were to move up to one of the best-built travel trailers you could live in it for many years, even if you were to park it permanently.

What manufacturers are considered the "best built"?  We'd pay more for quality of course, but there is a limit, if we want to stay mostly out of debt.  Still, we have time to look.

1 minute ago, Zulu said:

What will you be doing for health insurance?

Now THAT'S a good question.  We're both eligible to get continuing insurance thru our retirement.  (We're 25+ year state employees.)  BUT, it's not cheap.  AND we both have prescriptions we buy.  We're not in BAD health, but we're not exactly peachy either.  I especially have BP issues.  I'll be 60 the year we retire and my husband will only be 57, so...a few years before Medicare can kick in. 

It's something we're going to have to seriously look into, to see if we can get anything cheaper than we're offered through work.

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Here's a thread from a while back that covers some of what you are asking... Link

As you'll see from my tag lines, I have a Forest River and am very happy with it.   There's always people who say don't do this or don't do that....it's what makes you happy.  I found the more I looked at RV's both on lots and on-line, it was easy to throw out those that didn't fit my style.  And guess what, I had NO IDEA what my style was - I'd had horse trailers and stock trailers but never an RV.  I don't think anyone can buy the perfect RV first time out - there are so many things to be learned/experienced and I know my style will change in a year or two.  I do not regret one bit buying new, nor do I regret not buying what some folks think you need (read: expensive).  There's no law that says you can't change to something else later on...

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I would highly suggest that you go to RVers Boot Camp. It is held several times a year and is very popular. There will be one along with the Escapees annual Escapade in March. Going to this will educate you in the rving experience and show you what to look for in any rv. You don't need an rv to attend. This will allow you to make a more educated decision. There is also RV Online University with interesting courses and of course You Tube.

If you can also make the Escapade that would be one great educational experience and you will have lots of rvers to talk to .

You don't say where you are located.

There are going to be all sorts of things you will forget or have no knowledge of at this time. This is a norma experience..................

Good luck............

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Someone lives in most every type of RV out there. The trick is finding the best for you within what you are comfortable paying. Wanting no slides makes your hunt a little more challenging but it means you also have a great many RVs you don't have to look at. :)

If you do buy a TT, please buy an anti-sway hitch. That will make traveling much more comfortable.

In the meantime, I recommend you go to PPL's website and look at lots of rigs to see what used units are out there now. https://www.pplmotorhomes.com.  If possible, also go to RV shows to see in person what's out there in new rigs. Going inside rigs will give you a better sense of what different sizes mean in terms of livability. Floor plan diagrams don't give you a real feel.

And, yes, Boot Camp will teach you an amazing amount of information you probably don't even realize you need to know.

Good luck in your search. I don't think you will be sorry you decided to try this. And come back here with future questions and we'll do our best to help you.

Linda Sand

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47 minutes ago, Alice said:

What manufacturers are considered the "best built"? 

Most people would list the Airstream at or near the top of that list, but it is also the most expensive travel trailer made. I would take a hard look at the Winnebago Mini line of trailers. We own a trailer by KZ Sportsman line as they are probably mid-range in terms of price & quality. Another company that has a long history of customer support and a fairly wide range in price & quality would be Heartland Travel Trailers. Another manufacturer with a good reputation that I'd consider is Northwoods Manufacturing. I think that since you have little knowledge base to work from, you may benefit if you spend the money to become a member of the RV Consumer Group

Realize that I'm not saying that the Forest River would be a mistake but only that you need to study several different makes, models, and manufacturers. I think that you might also be wise to consider a used travel trailer in your thinking. While there are advantages to buying new, you can offset many of those by getting an extended warranty for it, as long as it is less than 10 years old as older than that most will not cover. If you do consider this approach, let me invite you to read this article from Escapees magazine which addresses them. As you shop it is also important to remember that there is no RV manufacturer that is so good that they have no dissatisfied customers and there is none so bad that they have no happy customers. No matter what you choose, always put your budget as top priority. Better to have a lesser quality RV that you can afford to travel in than to own a mansion on wheels that you can't afford fuel for. 

Edited by Kirk Wood

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I can't thank everyone enough for all the input!  :)

1 hour ago, dirtyboots said:

There's no law that says you can't change to something else later on...

True.  I have thought about that.  It pushes me to leaning toward used units, so as to avoid the huge depreciation that hits right off the bat.   That may be what we end up doing.  We've considered starting out smaller TT than the one we're eyeing...Murphy beds make them much nicer than they used to be.  But there's something to be said for that bedroom.

49 minutes ago, SWharton said:

You don't say where you are located.

You're right!  I missed that entirely.  I'm in Mid-Missouri.  So pretty much smack dab in the middle of the USA and yet strangely, in the middle of nowhere. 

40 minutes ago, sandsys said:

 If possible, also go to RV shows to see in person what's out there in new rigs.

We haven't seen any near us, though we've gone to a number of RV dealers.  Pretty much every time we drive by one we stop to see what they have that we haven't seen before.  We've also made trips specifically to see one we saw on RVTrader, just to see them in real life.  Husband always has to sit down on the toilets and step into the showers.  That's actually why we tossed Class B's out the window early and most other motorhomes - he often couldn't shut the door and that just won't do.  We're both big people.  If you can't turn around in the shower...no.  There is a big RV sale in the middle of September about 2 hours away.  We're thinking of going there, just to see what's there. 

23 minutes ago, Kirk Wood said:

As you shop it is also important to remember that there is no RV manufacturer that is so good that they have no dissatisfied customers and there is none so bad that they have no happy customers. No matter what you choose, always put your budget as top priority. Better to have a lesser quality RV that you can afford to travel in than to own a mansion on wheels that you can't afford fuel for. 

Kirk I really appreciate the information you've given!  It's actually hard for us to find many of the  manufacturers brands here in mid-Missouri.  I've googled some that tell me the closest dealer is two states away.  But again, we have time. 

Thanks again!

Edited by Alice

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Your plan sounds great to me...selling a house you hate, you have very little to lose and everything to gain. With pensions, there is no reason you can't comfortably FT until you settle down at your cabin or something you find during your travels.

Best of luck to you! You're asking good questions and your research will help you go in the right direction.

My own preference (not FT) is a Class C towing a small Honda CR-V. One of us can go potty or make coffee or take a nap while driving. Easy to set up. The CRV is great to run around in once we set up. I couldn't back a trailer in to save my soul.🤗

Edited by ToddF

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A couple of things we always look for are: walkaround bed, access to bathroom and refrigerator when on road. That is our starting point. Each peson has their own minimum of what they consider comfortable and no one picks the "perfect" rig the first time, generally 2-4 rigs before one is settled.

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1 hour ago, Zulu said:

What will you be doing for health insurance?

 

54 minutes ago, Alice said:

Now THAT'S a good question.  We're both eligible to get continuing insurance thru our retirement.  (We're 25+ year state employees.)  BUT, it's not cheap.  AND we both have prescriptions we buy.  We're not in BAD health, but we're not exactly peachy either.  I especially have BP issues.  I'll be 60 the year we retire and my husband will only be 57, so...a few years before Medicare can kick in. 

It's something we're going to have to seriously look into, to see if we can get anything cheaper than we're offered through work.

 

 

So 5 years for you and 8 years for your husband before Medicare. That's a lot of time getting individual health insurance. And I'll take a SWAG and say continuing your work health plan will probably be your best bet in both coverage and price.

However, come this Tuesday, you should "seriously" get some questions answered about your current state plan:

  • What, if anything, will you be required to pay to continue the plan up to age 65? Or is your coverage COBRA (good for only 18 months)? Are the rates fixed or can you expect yearly increases?
  • Is the health plan "portable"? Typically that means a PPO plan with a nationwide network of hospitals and doctors you can use (think Blue Cross/Blue Shield) or must you only use doctors/hospitals that are in state?
  • Does your health plan have a mail order service or nationwide pharmacy service (CVS, Walgreens) available for prescriptions?
  • If you change your domicile to another state, can you still keep your health plan?

To put this into perspective, the coach you select, the mail service you choose, etc, are very small potatoes next to health care costs, especially since you'll be starting your journey with known health care issues.

PS

From a recent post you said you're a resident of Missouri so it looks like these are pertinent web pages: MOSERS and MCHCP.

I did a cursory search and it looks like you would have an Aetna PPO plan. However, it is not a nationwide PPO plan, but a multi-state with doctors/hospitals in just Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas.

 

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12 minutes ago, ToddF said:

My own preference (not FT) is a Class C towing a small Honda CR-V. One of us can go potty or make coffee or take a nap while driving. Easy to set up. The CRV is great to run around in once we set up. I couldn't back a trailer in to save my soul.🤗

Actually, I wish we could swing a Class C and we might give it a try if we could find one with a floor plan we like - and a bathroom big enough to suit. :) 

13 minutes ago, SWharton said:

A couple of things we always look for are: walkaround bed, access to bathroom and refrigerator when on road. That is our starting point. Each peson has their own minimum of what they consider comfortable and no one picks the "perfect" rig the first time, generally 2-4 rigs before one is settled.

Thanks!  One of our favorite smaller ones, turns out you can't put the Murphy bed down without the slide extended.  Pity, everything else we loved. 

14 minutes ago, Zulu said:

However, come this Tuesday, you should "seriously" get some questions answered about your current state plan: 

  • What, if anything, will you be required to pay to continue the plan up to age 65? Or is your coverage COBRA (good for only 18 months)? Are the rates fixed or can you expect yearly increases?
  • Is the health plan "portable"? Typically that means a PPO plan with a nationwide network of hospitals and doctors you can use (think Blue Cross/Blue Shield) or must you only use doctors/hospitals that are in state? 
  • Does your health plan have a mail order service or nationwide pharmacy service (CVS, Walgreens) available for prescriptions?
  • If you change your domicile to another state, can you still keep your health plan?

We actually have a meeting with MOSERS next Friday.  We know these are things we have to figure out sooner rather than later.  We're not tooooo worried about doctors.  We literally see them once a year, get prescriptions refilled, and go on our way.  We could always just make our appointments in advance and plan to swing back through our state.  Maybe coinciding with husband's hunting season.  I know we can use Walgreens. 

These are important points to think about.  Thank you!

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1 minute ago, Alice said:

We're not tooooo worried about doctors.  We literally see them once a year, get prescriptions refilled, and go on our way.  We could always just make our appointments in advance and plan to swing back through our state.  Maybe coinciding with husband's hunting season. 

Yes, but. You can't decide when and where you will get sick or have an accident. We had retirees insurance and went back to our doctors for annual visits. But I also wound up in urgent care centers a couple of times and had a vision problem requiring a visit to an optometrist another time. Will your insurance cover those?

Linda

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3 minutes ago, sandsys said:

Yes, but. You can't decide when and where you will get sick or have an accident. We had retirees insurance and went back to our doctors for annual visits. But I also wound up in urgent care centers a couple of times and had a vision problem requiring a visit to an optometrist another time. Will your insurance cover those?

Linda

Another note taken.  Good thing we have some time to get these questions answered. 

What do other people do?  I can't be the only one under 65 to think about full-time RVing. 

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Check with your tax preparer...ask if you'll qualify for an ACA premium subsidy as early retirees. While the penalty for not having insurance goes to zero in '19, many of the other provisions (subsidies) are still intact.

There will be higher deductibles than you're accustomed to and the risk of needing services out of network which could be costly. Life is full of risks, I say don't over think it.

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Don't worry about the Murphy bed and the slide. You will have the slide extended 100% of the time.  Slides are good, they give you much more space. We have had slides since 1998(?) and never a problem with them that we didn't cause.

If you don't have RX coverage just drop into MX and pick them up. Same thing with dentists and other doctors, glasses etc.

 

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2 hours ago, Alice said:

It's actually hard for us to find many of the  manufacturers brands here in mid-Missouri.

You may need to travel to Kansas City but there should be a wide range of dealers there and as fall comes I would think that there would be a large RV show as well. Overland Park, KS has one in October. If you aren't in a hurry, next January there is the Mid America RV Show in Kansas City, MO. The major advantage to an RV show is that you can compare makes, models, and dealers all next to one another.  My best advice in the purchase process is to take your time! RV salespeople love to push you into a decision and to get you operating on emotions rather than logic. They are wizards at manipulating numbers to mislead buyers in what the actual cost is. That is especially true if you are going to finance. Never put much trust in a salesperson or in what they tell you. If you ask one whether or not your truck can tow what they are selling, almost every time the answer will be yes, even if they have no idea of what you can safely tow. If you do not know and understand the weight ratings for both the tow truck and your RVs then you need to learn about them before you buy anything. Those ratings are critical to your safety and handling. 

It was previously suggested that you attend the Escapee's RV Boot Camp and that might well be a good thing to do since you have no current RV knowledge. 

Along with the issue of healthcare you also need to consider where and how you will maintain a legal domicile in order to keep your driver's license, vehicle registrations, and your insurance. I believe that MO is one of the many states that do not allow the use of a mail service as an address for those things. The most popular states for RV folks to domicile are Texas, Florida, and South Dakota. That is because none of those states have any state income tax or time requirements for living in the state to be considered a resident, each of them accepts the use of a mail service as your legal address, and all have reasonable fees for licenses and fees. 

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When you go look at RVs bring a camera. The first picture of each rig should be one that tells you which rig it is--the RV's badge or seller's sign or something. You will NEVER remember what you saw in which rig without that clue. I don't usually like the word "should" but it is really important in this case.

Linda

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4 hours ago, SWharton said:

A couple of things we always look for are: walkaround bed, access to bathroom and refrigerator when on road. That is our starting point. Each peson has their own minimum of what they consider comfortable and no one picks the "perfect" rig the first time, generally 2-4 rigs before one is settled.

We've only had one rig for fulltiming.  We looked at a lot and we think we did pretty good with what we found.   

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1 hour ago, sandsys said:

When you go look at RVs bring a camera. The first picture of each rig should be one that tells you which rig it is--the RV's badge or seller's sign or something. You will NEVER remember what you saw in which rig without that clue. I don't usually like the word "should" but it is really important in this case.

Linda

Agreed, and better if it is video (smart phone will do) so you can make comments, get answers to questions recorded as you walk through.

Also, when doing a walk through, kick off your shoes, get in the shower and see if you can comfortably turn around, wash your hair, etc., in it.   Then sit down on the toilet (lid down) and, if there is a door, close it and see if it is comfortable.  If knees are at your chin, look at another rig.    If you look at slides, make sure you can reach all parts that you might need to use with the slides in.   We've been in a couple of storms (plus overnighters in repair facilities) where we had to everything in.  

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3 hours ago, SWharton said:

Don't worry about the Murphy bed and the slide. You will have the slide extended 100% of the time.  Slides are good, they give you much more space. We have had slides since 1998(?) and never a problem with them that we didn't cause.

We figure there may be times when we need to bring it in our not put it out,  Walmart boondocking,  or maybe we just want to take a nap at a rest stop?   The bed is an issue if you can't get to ii.

3 hours ago, Kirk Wood said:

You may need to travel to Kansas City but there should be a wide range of dealers there and as fall comes I would think that there would be a large RV show as well. Overland Park, KS has one in October. If you aren't in a hurry, next January there is the Mid America RV Show in Kansas City, MO.

RV salespeople love to push you into a decision and to get you operating on emotions rather than logic. They are wizards at manipulating numbers to mislead buyers in what the actual cost is. That is especially true if you are going to finance. Never put much trust in a salesperson or in what they tell you. 

Along with the issue of healthcare you also need to consider where and how you will maintain a legal domicile in order to keep your driver's license, vehicle registrations, and your insurance. I believe that MO is one of the many states that do not allow the use of a mail service as an address for those things. The most popular states for RV folks to domicile are Texas, Florida, and South Dakota. That is because none of those states have any state income tax or time requirements for living in the state to be considered a resident, each of them accepts the use of a mail service as your legal address, and all have reasonable fees for licenses and fees. 

As it turns out,  we're actually driving thru Overland Park on Oct. 19...on our way home from visiting our son in Colorado!  If we can take our dog in,  we're there.  Otherwise,  guess we'll wait.  We are going to one in Springfield in a few weeks.   

We're fine with salesmen... We don't do high pressure.  Nothing makes us walk away faster.  ;)

We own a piece of of hunting land we can use as a physical address.  We might do that for a time,  until we weigh the benefits and drawbacks of changing domicile.  

2 hours ago, sandsys said:

When you go look at RVs bring a camera. The first picture of each rig should be one that tells you which rig it is--the RV's badge or seller's sign or something. You will NEVER remember what you saw in which rig without that clue. I don't usually like the word "should" but it is really important in this case.

Linda

We started doing that very thing about the 3rd place we went,. LOL  it's a good thing my phone has lots of storage.  :)

1 hour ago, Barbaraok said:

Also, when doing a walk through, kick off your shoes, get in the shower and see if you can comfortably turn around, wash your hair, etc., in it.   Then sit down on the toilet (lid down) and, if there is a door, close it and see if it is comfortable.  If knees are at your chin, look at another rig.    If you look at slides, make sure you can reach all parts that you might need to use with the slides in.   We've been in a couple of storms (plus overnighters in repair facilities) where we had to everything in.  

We do this too. We're not small people.  Bathrooms are important.  :)

Your comment on the slides is exactly why our favorite Murphy bed version had to move down the list.  

Edited by Alice
Darn autocorrect...

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4 minutes ago, Alice said:

our comment on the slides is exactly why our favorite Murphy bed version had to move down the list.  

My Dave likes slides for the expanded sense of space they provide. But we have had to pull slides in for storms or service so being able to get to the bed, bathroom, and fridge with slides in is important.

Also, pay attention to kitchen counter space. Do you have a place to prepare food that's not on the dining table? Since you said you want an oven I'm guessing you plan to prepare food. :)

Linda

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11 minutes ago, sandsys said:

Also, pay attention to kitchen counter space. Do you have a place to prepare food that's not on the dining table? Since you said you want an oven I'm guessing you plan to prepare food. :)

Yes, that's definite.  If we could afford to eat out all the time we'd be looking at a whole different travel style.  LOL.   No,  i like to cook.  The other pity about the Murphy bed version is it had a very deep kitchen cabinet, room to set things.  

Maybe,  they'll change that by the time we're ready to buy.🤔

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9 hours ago, Alice said:

The other pity about the Murphy bed version is it had a very deep kitchen cabinet, room to set things.  

 

This is an example of the reason that I strongly suggest you get out to see many different brands and models. If you do not, sooner or later you will discover a different one that has what you really wanted, but after you have spent your money! 

The best way to judge space in an RV is to pantomime doing all of the activities that you will do in them. That means cooking, bathing, cleaning, making the bed, and if you are both active at the same time, both should take part in this. Because an RV has so limited space it is critical that you find one that allocates the space you have to the places where it is most important to you both. Like Barb, we also only owned 1 RV for fulltime living but also like Barb it was not the first RV we ever owned and used.

Edited by Kirk Wood

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