Jump to content

Balancing trailer tires


VC 23RSS
 Share

Recommended Posts

I want to remove my wheels to check the brakes and bearings and figure I'll run the Goodyear Endurance tires side at a time down to the local garage to have them balanced.

 

Some say it isn't necessary but that's not the question here.  My concern is will I get and accurate balance since the tires haven't moved in 3 months and may have flat spots?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are so many questions. 

How old are the tires?

How long since the last move? 

Have they been on concrete, grass, gravel or asphalt for the most recent park? 

Why do you feel the need for balancing? 

I've recently started working at a Tire Retailer. Back in the 70's I worked at a Full Service "Gas" station and mainly took care of automotive and light truck tires. Now the shop handles almost everything. 

What I've learned so far with my own tires and from the recent experience at the shop. Trailer tires need to be moved or at least have much of the pressure taken off of them when sitting for long periods. Loss of flex is what you are calling "Flat Spotting" actual Flat spotting is when the tire is slid for a way's during a panic stop or a malfunction of a brake. It actually removes rubber from a single spot causing the flat spot on the tread. 

None of the Over The Road trucks and trailers ever balance the tires, except for steer tires and they toss in a bag of balance beads usually and that's it. Others have used the "Centramatic" disc's behind the wheels and swear by them. Some even on axles other than steers. It's your choice. 

I decided on my last tire purchase to use the least expensive tires on the trailer, similar to what came on it from the factory. I got over 7 years on 6 of them, but "Flat Spotted" two with a brake malfunction and had to replace them last spring.  On the truck I buy  "Good" Steer tires and have gone to mid price drives. I did have equal tossed in all the tires the first time I had them changed but went with just the steers last spring and haven't noticed anything different.

That's not exactly true. When I had the "Good" drive tires put on 7 years ago, they were squirrely for over a 1000 miles. Brother (owner of the tire shop) told me that was common on brand new tires until they got through a few heat and cooling cycles. 

The lesser expensive tires didn't seem to need as much break in time.  

So if you want to have the trailer tires balanced, check the pressure in all of them,  hook up and take a drive to warm them up good before removing them. Have the shop put them on the machine and give them a spin. You will be able to tell how much out of balance they were by the number and size of the weights applied. Steel wheels are the best to have so the weights are attached firmly to the wheel. Aluminum wheels need to be cleaned and an adhesive backed weight is placed. They don't often come off, but the residue from the adhesive attracts dirt and can cause a misbalance after a time if allowed to build up. 

More info than you probably wanted. 

Hope it helped anyway. 


Rod

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If possible, I would take the trailer for a spin around the area for at least 15 minutes if possible. It would be a shame to pay the money for the balancing and it not be right. 

I always balance my RV trailer tires as it will give a smoother ride for the trailer and we all know how poor our roads are. We pull with a semi truck and use the Centramatic wheel balancers on all of the wheels on it and they have improved the ride immensely. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  Everyone I know who runs highway with ANY type of truck, balances all tires.  Whether balancing beads or lead weights, it gets done.  And most folks who care about their trailers and loads, balance the trailer tires as well.  Personally, I've found balancing camper tires makes the trailer last longer, as you aren't inducing vibrations into the structure.  The lighter the trailer, the more important this becomes.

So, my personally opinion is, yes, tow the trailer around a bit to exercise the tires back into "round", and then balance.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The trailer was built 01/21/21.  i could check the date code to be more specific.   Trailer has about 5,500 miles and not unusual wear patterns developing.  Currently sitting on limestone for 3 months at home.  I called my local garage and he does have the lug centric adapter but agrees balancing them without putting some miles on them is a waste of time and money.  Just as I thought.

Last winter we were parked for four months and when we left to come home I monitored the rear camera at different speeds in hopes of catching any excessive vibration and saw none.  This year we will be staying 7 months in one spot.  I guess the best way to do it is to stop at a tire shop on my way south and go get lunch while they are being balanced. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Always inflate ST - special trailer tires to sidewall listed pressure! This is due to the extreme stress put on tandem axle tires during sharp turns. It is so important Carlisle Tire used to state in their warranty that running less than sidewall pressure voided the warranty.

During storage, inflating to 10psi over sidewall listed pressure is recommended, to prevent inducing a permanent set in the cord plies.

Answering your  question, yes I've always balanced all vehicle tires for the reasons rickelo stated.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, Ray,IN said:

Always inflate ST - special trailer tires to sidewall listed pressure! This is due to the extreme stress put on tandem axle tires during sharp turns. It is so important Carlisle Tire used to state in their warranty that running less than sidewall pressure voided the warranty.

(side note; I once watched a man make a spot turn on a TX blacktop highway with  a 5er, the hot pavement and extreme sidewall flex rolled one tire so much it broke the bead seal and flattened that tire)

During storage, inflating to 10psi over sidewall listed pressure is recommended, to prevent inducing a permanent set in the cord plies.

Answering your  question, yes I've always balanced all vehicle tires for the reasons rickelo stated.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

RV Cable Grip

RV Cable Grip

All the water you need...No matter where you go

Country Thunder Iowa

Nomad Internet

Rv Share

Dish For My RV.

RV Air.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

The Rvers- Now Streaming

RVTravel.com Logo



×
×
  • Create New...