Jump to content

Headsup for those planning to visit the Cottonwood, Camp Verde, Sedona area


trailertraveler

Recommended Posts

This may be old news, but it is our first visit to the area since the 2015 shootout in the Walmart parking lot. The very popular BLM area just off AZ-260 on Thousand Trails Road is currently posted as Day Use Only. Dispersed vehicle camping is still permitted on a number of Forest Roads. Make sure you get a copy of the current Motor Vehicle Use Map (dated April 15, 2018). There were lots of RVs and tents along FR-525 between AZ-89A and Palatki Ruins.  The rules allow for vehicle camping within 300' of the roadway. However; the way the road is graded with ditches along the shoulder, would make it difficult for most RV's to exit and re-enter the road. Every prepared pull off had several RVs and/or tents yesterday afternoon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's a write-up of that area from 2013.  Guess things have changed.  The Thousand Trails small area was where we attended our very first gathering of Escapees Boomers back in 1997.  Many in attendance are our friends today!

https://wheelingit.us/2013/04/11/boondocking-site-review-thousand-trails-road-prescott-nfs-cottonwood-az/

Edited by 2gypsies

Full-timed for 16 Years
Traveled 8 yr in a 2004 Newmar Dutch Star 40' Motorhome
and 8 yr in a 33' Travel Supreme 5th Wheel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 hours ago, Vladimir said:

Thanks for the update.....BUT

The area in question is Forest Service NOT BLM.

Folks can get the travel plan maps from the Coconino National Forest.  The Avencia site might have the Coconino travel plan maps for a free download.

The area I described is apparently part of the Prescott National Forest. My bad. The MVUM can be found here. It is on the East Map.  If you look at the Coconino National Forest Map, there is no Coconino Forest land West/South of the Verde River. The  Coconino National Forest MVUM can be downloaded from the Forest's Website.  The area being discussed is on the South Map as is  the area along FR-525 mentioned in my initial post.

Edited by trailertraveler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Rich&Sylvia said:

There's Arizona Trust Land in that area.  You need a permit ($20 family).  More info here: https://land.az.gov/natural-resources/recreational-permits

In my experience, Arizona Trust Lands are generally well marked with signs indicating the requirement for a permit to enter. The location of Trust Lands can be seen on this website.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Carlos said:

It is usually marked, yes.  However you need the permit in advance, you can't just get it on demand.  So if you're going to be dry camping around AZ, it wouldn't be terribly expensive to keep that $20 permit active.

You can get a permit online here

Quote

Your permit will not be mailed to you, nor is your receipt your permit.  After paying for your permit, you must select the “continue” button to proceed to permit printing.  A copy of your permit will also be sent to the e-mail address you provided.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Tried reading some of their stuff, don't understand most.  Are these lands like BLM, pay for a permit and camp?  Or are the permits only for *stepping* on state property?  What is this land actually for?

2002 Fifth Avenue RV (RIP) 2015 Ram 3500 Mega-cab DRW(38k miles), 6.7L Cummins Diesel, A668RFE, 3.73, 14,000 GVWR, 5,630 Payload, 27,300 GCWR, 18,460 Max Trailer Weight Rating(For Sale) , living in the frigid north, ND.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, Carlos said:

It is usually marked, yes.  However you need the permit in advance, you can't just get it on demand.  So if you're going to be dry camping around AZ, it wouldn't be terribly expensive to keep that $20 permit active.

It changed in the last couple of years.  You can get the permit on line and print it out - no more sending in a check and waiting for the mail.  
As for signage, I've seen simple "State Trust Land" signs on site and nothing about usage on the property.  In general, it permits one to use the land for hiking, camping, ATV'ing, biking, etc.  (And probably shooting -given the amount of shells I've found on the ground in one particular site - though I've seen "no shooting" signs near the Cave Creek county park.)
For the twenty bucks, the permit is for one year.  I stayed at one site and the road was graded with high banks - I could traverse the banks with a truck camper but probably not with lower ground clearance vehicles. 
I think it's cheap, for twenty bucks.

 

Lance-white-sands-500.jpg

~Rich

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, NDBirdman said:

Tried reading some of their stuff, don't understand most.  Are these lands like BLM, pay for a permit and camp?  Or are the permits only for *stepping* on state property?  What is this land actually for?

State Trust Lands were conveyed from the federal government to states when territories gained statehood. 

From the State Lands Website:

Quote

Arizona State Trust lands are not "public lands", as are Federal lands under the management of the U.S. Forest Service or the Bureau of Land Management. Federal "public lands" are managed for the benefit and use of the public, while State Trust lands are managed for the benefit of 13 Trust beneficiaries, which include the public schools and prisons. The Land Department's trust management responsibilities include requiring a permit or lease and charging a fee for use of Trust land. Exceptions to this requirement are licensed hunters and fishers, actively pursuing game or fish, in-season, and certain archaeological activities permitted by the Arizona State Museum.

A ‘Recreational Use Permit’ is temporary and revocable and does not permit commercial, competitive or group events. Lands leased for agriculture, mining, commercial, or military purposes are not open to recreational use. Other State Trust Lands may be closed to some or all recreational uses due to hazardous conditions, dust abatement, in coordination with the Arizona Game & Fish Department or based on certain State, County or Local laws or ordinances.
Recreational Permit allows the signatory limited privileges to use State Trust Land for some recreation. Recreation under this permit is limited to hiking, horseback riding, picnics, bicycling, photography, sightseeing, and bird watching. Camping is restricted to no more than 14 days per year. Off-Highway Vehicular travel on State Trust Land is not permitted without proper licensing

 

.
Quote

A Family Permit grants a family unit (two adults and their children under 18 years of age) access to State Trust land for certain types of recreational activities including bicycling, bird watching, GPS-based recreational activities (geocaching), hiking, horseback riding, off-highway vehicle (OHV) usage, photography, picnicking, and sightseeing.

 

Quote

The Permittee(s) shall not discharge a firearm on State Trust land, except pursuant to lawful and licensed hunting.  An ASLD Recreational Permit is not required for individuals with a valid hunting and/or fishing license whom are actively pursuing game or fish. 

 

Edited by trailertraveler
Link to comment
Share on other sites

So, when they say " Camping is restricted to no more than 14 days per year. " is that for all trust lands, or for each trust plot?  If you stay on one plot, is that it for the year, or can you move to a different plot according to their map?  Looking at the map link above, that covers a lot of area.

Edited by NDBirdman

2002 Fifth Avenue RV (RIP) 2015 Ram 3500 Mega-cab DRW(38k miles), 6.7L Cummins Diesel, A668RFE, 3.73, 14,000 GVWR, 5,630 Payload, 27,300 GCWR, 18,460 Max Trailer Weight Rating(For Sale) , living in the frigid north, ND.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's not enforced generally against actual campers, but it means total time on state land.  A ranger told me it was simply to prevent people from permanently living on the land.  So basically if he saw you for two weeks, he'd tell you to leave.

Edited by Carlos
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 9/30/2019 at 10:29 PM, trailertraveler said:

The area I described is apparently part of the Prescott National Forest. My bad. The MVUM can be found here. It is on the East Map.  If you look at the Coconino National Forest Map, there is no Coconino Forest land West/South of the Verde River. The  Coconino National Forest MVUM can be downloaded from the Forest's Website.  The area being discussed is on the South Map as is  the area along FR-525 mentioned in my initial post.

Not your bad.

The different agencies that manage the public lands are different.  Having worked for the BLM, FS, and NPS I can tell who has management responsibility just by looking at the road standards. It does make it confusing for the public, but knowing who is the managing agency will pay dividends in allowing you to enjoy your public lands without interruption. 

It is the FIRST thing I check when I encounter public lands. That pretty much tells me what I can do and where!!

THANKS...for linking to the Coconino forest site. I learned some new stuff.

Vladimir

Vladimr Steblina

Retired Forester...exploring the public lands.

usbackroads.blogspot.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

RV Destinations

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

The Rvers- Now Streaming

RVTravel.com Logo



×
×
  • Create New...