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Chevy Volt as toad and aux battery bank......


rbertalotto

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How about using a Chevy Volt as a toad and tapping into the enormous lithium ion battery as part of your 12v system. Built in generator as you drive around exploring. Enough juice to run your AC. Modified so regenitive braking charges batteries as you tow.
GM should work on this. They would make a killing!

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The Volt can't be towed 4 down. It Must be towed on a tow dolly. So no regenerative braking charges batteries as you tow.

 

Spark EV can go many miles more on a charge, and cheaper to buy.

 

The many plug & drive vehicles now available.

 

Why replace the RV Generator that is already built into many RV's that won't shorten a Electric cars battery life that is expensive to replace?

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Modified so regenitive braking charges batteries as you tow...........................GM should work on this. They would make a killing!

We are far too small a market to justify the sort of modifications that would be required to do that. Look how few vehicles are being built which can be towed.

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Tapping into the Volt's battery pack for 12VDC wouldn't be that difficult. And it has the ability to produce 160A of 12VDC from the HV traction battery. Any time you can run a small spark-ignition engine at full throttle near the torque peak, it's pretty efficient--far more so than a fixed-speed generator like what's installed in most motorhomes, especially when using an Atkinson cycle engine.

 

Through-the-road charging would only make sense if controlled by the tow vehicle, which gets complicated in a hurry. You wouldn't want to add extra drag all the time and force the motorhome to do extra work--factoring in the transmission and driveline losses, it wouldn't work out too well.

 

There are a number of active projects looking at grid-connected BEV and PHEV vehicles, but ultimately they usually don't make sense. Especially with a battery electric vehicle--who wants to worry about whether everyone else's electricity use has left them enough charge to run an errand?

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Their this guy who has a tract of land next to my bug out location. It's a maybe a 2010/2011. I know he has modified his Volt to supplement his battery bank when there is insufficient solar. He's kind of a recluse but next time our paths cross I'll see if he can share what he has done. Last time we talked he said the one of his concerns was the petrol going bad in the tank since when he drives it's normally less than a 60 -70 mile round trip. At that time he was trying to get the Volt's petrol engine to run off either propane or natural gas. As soon as I can find a dealer that has a 2016 Volt in stock with the full back seat so it can carry 5 people I'll probably go and look at it.

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Tapping into the Volt's battery pack for 12VDC wouldn't be that difficult. And it has the ability to produce 160A of 12VDC from the HV traction battery. Any time you can run a small spark-ignition engine at full throttle near the torque peak, it's pretty efficient--far more so than a fixed-speed generator like what's installed in most motorhomes, especially when using an Atkinson cycle engine.

 

Through-the-road charging would only make sense if controlled by the tow vehicle, which gets complicated in a hurry. You wouldn't want to add extra drag all the time and force the motorhome to do extra work--factoring in the transmission and driveline losses, it wouldn't work out too well.

 

There are a number of active projects looking at grid-connected BEV and PHEV vehicles, but ultimately they usually don't make sense. Especially with a battery electric vehicle--who wants to worry about whether everyone else's electricity use has left them enough charge to run an errand?

The majority of diesel pushers have a variable-speed genset, can't say about gassers.

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The majority of diesel pushers have a variable-speed genset, can't say about gassers.

That seems to be the answer to the "quiet diesel" line. Our gas Onan back in 1998 was a constant 3600 rpm. On the other hand, all 3 versions of gasoline and the smallest (3200 watt) of the three diesels are all constant speed, based upon the Onan brochure which I just downloaded from their site tonight.

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That's it on page two of the Onan pdf you linked to, 1,400-2,600 rpm, depending on amperage demand. When I start my 7.5 kw Onan quiet diesel it just purrs quietly, when I start the heat pump/ AC unit the engine speed up. Flip the water heater to electric, the Onan speeds up more, turn on the microwave the Onan speeds up more.

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