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The Tech Stocks That Unseated Apple Inc. (AAPL) in Daniel Benton’s Portfolio: Twitter Inc (TWTR), Tesla Motors Inc (TSLA), Facebook Inc (FB)


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Excerpt:

 

"Daniel Benton’s Andor Capital Management has filed its 13F for the reporting period of March 31, with the investment manager boasting an equity portfolio of $1.01 billion as of the reporting date. One of the major moves in the equity portfolio of the fund manager is that Twitter Inc (NYSE:TWTR) has dethroned Apple Inc (NASDAQ:AAPL) as the biggest tech pick of Benton, who sold off most of his Apple holding. Tesla Motors Inc (NASDAQ:TSLA) and Facebook Inc (NASDAQ:FB) also leapt over Apple in Andor Capital’s portfolio, despite the holding in the latter also being slashed by Benton. Andor Capital Management has a concentrated portfolio with two-thirds of it devoted to tech, while consumer discretionary stocks make up the bulk of the remaining one-third.

 

 

The electric carmaker Tesla Inc (NYSE:TSLA) is the second-largest tech stock holding of Andor Capital Management, which owns 1.00 million shares of the automobile manufacturer, with a value of $188.77 million. The investment manager trimmed its stake in the car company by 20% during the first quarter. Shares of the high-end luxury carmaker have grown 10.53% this year, pushing its market cap back above $30 billion at $30.89 billion. Tesla is known for using an unorthodox retail market approach, including selling its cars online and bypassing dealerships with its own retail showrooms. The electric automobile company is planning to roll out its mobile store units that can easily be set-up at popular summer locations. If done in a proper manner, this approach could help Tesla Inc (NYSE:TSLA) unlock yet another novel retailing model. Some of the major stockholders of the company include Ken Griffin‘s Citadel Investment Group, Masters Capital Management, and Arbiter Partners Capital Management.

 

The whole article with lots more and the links is here: http://www.insidermonkey.com/blog/the-tech-stocks-that-unseated-apple-inc-aapl-in-daniel-bentons-portfolio-twitter-inc-twtr-tesla-motors-inc-tsla-facebook-inc-fb-348810/

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I just read that one of the major fund managers has stated that those that get out of Apple will rue the day. He says that it is still the most innovative company out there and predicts a growing stock price.

Myself, it has been a great stock for the last few months along with Tesla. Only two stocks I own.

Apple 112 in January currently 132

Tesla 206 in January now 247

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Duke,

As you know my attempt to buy Apple stock fizzled because I was chicken to play stocks individually. Go ahead, rub it in. But I learned from that miss not to hesitate on Tesla if it ever IPO'd, so I was waiting for it.

 

Congrats on two perfect choices. I believe that under Apple's Tim Cook, and MS under Satya Nadella, that both are going to make money for their stockholders long term.

 

Tesla is in a whole other category.

 

I posted the article for the surprising changes happening now.

 

I expect Tesla to come under attack and stay volatile with an ever increasing fallback as we've seen for the last two years. Strange days. Elon debuted Tesla cars with the super luxury Roadster in 2008 and 2009, then went on to IPO and built the factory and Model S. I think it is bear market proof save some volatility for another five years as long as Musk continues to execute.

 

After the model 3, the Gigafactory completion to full planned size, the saturation of supercharger stations here and abroad, the continued pressure of buyers to allow the direct sales model to co-exist with the manufacturers that still have franchised dealers, and the floodgate of battery orders from other manufacturers, combined with demand for the Powerwall backup residential and enterprise scaled battery systems, then it may slow down at around $500 or more a share.

 

Most CEOs could not do one of the above on time and on budget, with the quality nearly as high.

 

The funny thing is that they have already changed a biz model right under everyone's nose. Not one of Tesla's divisions has spent a penny on saturation ads. And still outsells every car in its class. I doubt that any other CEO save the ones at Apple and MS could project the charisma and immediate reaction to a tweet, in any car or computer company they can. They execute is the common denominator.

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Of course if I was really smart, i would have kept my initial investment in Tesla when I had it at 25.xx. Did make a profit but not like it would be now.

That must count more like a bad investment decision.

I'm not sure than any investment that turns a profit could be called a "bad investment decision". I made a bad investment decision when I tried to predict gold futures. But it turned out to be a good educational decision. :P

 

WDR

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I expect Apple could get another bump once they formally introduce their new, larger, improved Apple TV. Formal No Go, for now, on an actual TV. This is a new larger box that will stream. Sounds like they're going to make a tow hold more into the cable companies decades deadlock on traditional networks, which of course used to be The Big Three of ABC, CBS and NBC... They're also going to bring in audio on this, with again other music providers then just iTunes.

 

We've been in-out-in a several times over the last 10 years. Currently sitting in a long position at about 88% gain. I used the profits from the same, in-out-in relationship I've had with Tesla. And yes, we ratcheted back into a Tesla position too, when they dipped down.

 

And due to some brilliant (NOT!) research on my part, I have a very nice loss to offset some gain harvesting this year:)!

 

You win some, you lose some. These funds are not our 'retirement bucket'. The objective of the funds I keep in our TD Ameritrade account, is to fund RV modifications, and other such fun related toys. I'm pretty disciplined at keeping this at a certain level. Once the account is up 20% overall, I harvest and park those funds towards the fun things... So while I hate to see a loss, the pressure on keeping our retirement funded for I hope several decades - is not tied to these funds:)!

 

Best to all,

Smitty

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Sometimes what people post in support of one investment and in opposition to others is done for reasons of self-interest with the hope that so doing will cause the investment of choice to grow. I always wonder when I see constant positive or negative reports on the same companies over and over. One really needs to be very careful what stories and advice you take if the adviser has no personal gain from what you choose to invest in.

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Sometimes what people post in support of one investment and in opposition to others is done for reasons of self-interest with the hope that so doing will cause the investment of choice to grow. I always wonder when I see constant positive or negative reports on the same companies over and over. One really needs to be very careful what stories and advice you take if the adviser has no personal gain from what you choose to invest in.

 

 

Great point Kirk. I, like you, worked in the Fortune 100 companies. 10 years ago. The two largest 5 year band age group of employees we had in our hunk of the corporation (About 30K out of a total corporation of 100K + employees.) were the 60-65 group, and the 50-55 age group. I was in the 50-55 age group at that time. We had a Brown Bag gang that varied from 15-20 people at any given time. We solved world peace, determined what happened to Hoffa, etc. But every Thursday's session, was on finance and retirement planning. This Brown Bag group was a pretty even mix between these two different age groups.

 

One of the most heated conversations I recall, was from two well respected people that were two or so years away from retiring. One was a firm believer in managing his own funds, even in retirement, and stressed the benefits of choosing funds that were low Expense Ratios. This gent had no traditional brokerage or stocks accounts, it was all in 401K and towards the end Roth 401K's. The second gent had this same mix of 401K and Roth 401k's, but also had a Stock Brokerage account. The second gent acknowledge that all things being equal, of course the lower Expense Ratios were a no brainer. He did feel that having a Financial Planner that had some 'skin in the game' in relation to where and how your total assets were invested, was a good idea. He openly shared that the Financial Planner got a piece of his action, based upon total value of investment. With higher percentages, at higher levels. (He this as an 'active relationship' where he would meet quarterly with the advisor. And as needed the two would call each other in between. They both would review things, and kick things around, and then make a decision on what to do. The advisor had 'trade authority' for him in his brokerage account, and could make trades up to a certain level, without first consulting with this gent I worked with.)

 

Flash forward to about a year ago, and we had a small not company sponsored group retirement lunch. And about 9 out of the 14 of us sitting in this lunchroom, had been in the Brown Bag gang before retiring. Both of these gents were at this session. Gent one, whom actively managed his now IRA (Fidelity kept, which is good.), openly shared that he'd had about a three year average rate of return of just over 4%. Said he was conservatively invested. I talked with gent two on the way to our cars, and asked if he minded sharing how he was doing with his investment during retirement. He said he had chuckled some under his breath when Gent one commented about his returns. He said he'd had after cost returns of somewhere north of 7%. He was happy, his FP advisor was also pleased - as the investments had reached the next milestone cost level to net him a higher piece of the action. He said he suspected his overall investments were probably 'moderately conservative' then Gent one's. He slept well at night, and felt that he was appropriately invested. One other bit of info he shared, was that his gains of above 7% - were after he'd decided to start drawing some down, to hold off until age 70 to collect SS. (His wife is a bit younger then him, and did not have his earning history, so he wanted to maximize the potential Survivor Benefit from SS.)

 

So between these two, the one with an advisor with 'some skin in the game' - seemed to becoming out the winner so far. But to be fair, both gents were happy and comfortable with their investment position for being retired - so in my book, that makes them both winners.

 

My meaning for this long info sharing, was that in this case (Yep, a very small sampling:)!) - the gent that had an advisor with something to personally gain - seemed to be doing well for both his client, and himself too:)!

 

As a caution, having been with a group of over 50 fellow employees this division of the company that have retired in the last two years (I missed the buyout offers, I was already gone by about three months before they started up. But many that had planned to stick around to 62 to 65 took the handshake an ran:)!) - I know of two people that have been taken advantage of from a "Financial Planner". They did not do due diligence, and both were referred to this guy from a golfing buddy. Turns out he had no professional licensing, and classified himself as Financial Life Coach... No fiduciary responsibility what so ever. And has now left the Southern California area... PLEASE, if looking for help from a Financial Planner/advisor - do thorough due diligence. And background checks on the person you go with... At this phase in our life cycles, it's not quite as easy to make up from bad investments, or down and out embezzlement...

 

Best to all, be safe, and invest to your comfort and experience levels,

Smitty

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We had a Brown Bag gang that varied from 15-20 people at any given time. We solved world peace, determined what happened to Hoffa, etc. But every Thursday's session, was on finance and retirement planning.

My kinda group, for sure! We could probably do that and more on these forums if we would only all get behind all of the "experts" that give us so much free advice! Most of it is worth nearly as much as it costs us too! :rolleyes:

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You win some, you lose some. These funds are not our 'retirement bucket'. The objective of the funds I keep in our TD Ameritrade account, is to fund RV modifications, and other such fun related toys. I'm pretty disciplined at keeping this at a certain level. Once the account is up 20% overall, I harvest and park those funds towards the fun things... So while I hate to see a loss, the pressure on keeping our retirement funded for I hope several decades - is not tied to these funds:)!

 

Best to all,

Smitty

 

It sounds pretty smart to me Smitty. I hope you're able to make some "big modifications". :)

 

Jim

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Smitty,

You've helped me with understanding all of this long ago. Good for you. When you told me you were getting out I knew there was a lot of play left. I'm glad you're long again as a buy at the last dip at $198 has already gained 25% in a couple of months. I'm happy to have house money long on my stock, and adding more. Like you, none of this was or is tied to my retirement funds. You know mine were leftovers when I decided to retire again. Nothing would be affected if we lost it all, as while invested, I can't handle it or spend it until I sell. Since I take nothing out to spend after taking our profit of 1/6 of our original investment and our full original investment back out, and now having the value of our remaining shares worth almost 15 times the original amount we will stay long until after the Gigafactory is done and both the Model X and Model 3 are out in full production. It is very entertainment watching the comings and goings of the market and the sour grapes histrionics of the posers.

 

It seems some folks will holler and whine about advice they did not take as being bad. Aesop's fox and the grapes. Their hind sights need to be adjusted for windage. ;)

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We've been OK on our Modifications Funds:)! (Solar Panel system including new PSW inverter and larger 800AH Lifelines; Cabinet work and LCD TV installed; Buskote on roof; Travler for DirecTV and Winegard Auto OTA Antenna; Road Kings and Super Steer MCU's; Recliners replaced; and now in for front of cab day/night roller shades, and stereo replacement for the Bose. The DW wants to replace the front living area light color carpet with wood flooring, so that will be next.) All done as time and funds permitted... So if it takes a few years, that is OK!

 

Kirk - I've never sat in on one, just due to timing. But Technomadia has their online discussions from time to time. I could see an off shoot of a virtual online Brown Bagger session:)! Would enjoy listening in, and if they could get Nina's other half Paul to get jump into it - that would be a great first session. (I like Paul's blog, and he has recently started some You Tube sessions. But interacting is always better.) Toss in some of the gang from this board, many of whom I feel are far advanced in the disciplines of investing - and it would be solid brain trust!!

 

RV - I expect you will be the first one of us with a stacker trailer to pull your Tesla S around behind you, and other toys, when you start harvesting your Tesla stock... And like you (I believe?), I'll take a real close look at Space X if it ever IPO's!

 

Best to all,

Smitty

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Smitty I hear ya! I have a few years yet before Tesla stock will mature IMO. You've done well. Remember, I'm no trader or advisor. I do what I call guerilla economics and always make out. I only knew and know Musk and his projects from before PayPal days. (Zip2, X.com) and was frustrated for the two years, 2008-2009, before we could invest. I had my petty cash/payroll account burning to be getting real returns. My salary back then was all invested, we have no bills to pay. We bought USAA funds cheap when everyone was running and liquidating.

 

For more than a decade I've been telling folks what a Business Insider article said in 2013. But folks think truth is hype today, or can't be bothered to distinguish the difference. They just run to or from. My percent of gains I can't even figure accurately because it is anywhere from my most recent 130 buy now almost 100%, and my first purchases, now 1500% up (15 times purchase price five years ago.) The article's title is:

 

The Fabulous Life Of Elon Musk

 

"When it comes to imagining life as a billionaire, most people think of the things that such money would let them buy — yachts, mansions, and cool cars.

Elon Musk isn't like most people.

 

Only 14 years after making his first millions, Elon Musk is one of the most influential businessmen alive today. He's involved with more industries than your average person has hobbies.

 

Rather than use the wealth he's attained for leisure, Musk has repeatedly shown that he would prefer to spend his money on turning his passion projects into companies that change the world.

http://www.businessinsider.com/the-fabulous-life-of-elon-musk-2013-10?op=1#ixzz3bB6neHdM

 

good read

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