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Earthquake Preparedness


sandsys

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The only preparedness one can do is stash a supply of drinking water and rations, everything else is a guessing game. IMO, an RV, parked outside away from trees and buildings, is the best place for that. In todays world the next issue- after the disaster, is to keep it

My Dad spoke to me about the great depression, He said during that time people would ask for food, perhaps you'd miss a chicken now and then; but today someone would simply kill you and take what they want.

Keep your water tank full, your pantry full, your powder dry.

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The only preparedness one can do is stash a supply of drinking water and rations, everything else is a guessing game.

My guess is you didn't follow the link. There were tips on securing things inside your rig before driving your own personal earthquake down the road.

 

Linda Sand

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  • 3 weeks later...

Great info! :) Living in California, I think it's a good darn idea to have the RV for emergencies. Part of our preparations is maintenance on it. I think alot of folks let things slide to long, then when the emergency comes along they wonder why everything isn't working.

 

To be ready involves camping often to use the equipment and in between travel, do the maintenance. We carry 72 hour kits in all of our vehicles. Printed maps in case cell phones go down too.

 

I do find it interesting that even FEMA now says "supplies for MULTIPLE DAYS" when just a year ago they would say 3 days. After hurricanes in US they admit the time for response may take alot longer. The 7-10 days suggested in this link information might even be too short.

 

I also have one other suggestion. Please take pictures of everything with your cell, email to yourself. Find time to download all of them to a flash drive and put that with your GRAB FIRST bag. Include pictures of your RV inside and outside, ID, bank cards, medicine information and insurance. That way, if you don't have time to grab your paperwork the info is available. Even if you don't download, just move the emails to a file. It will be there on the cloud if you need it. Worth the time.

 

I used to work at claims center for Insurance Company. It really broke my heart when taking a claim on a RV fulltimer, asking them to send us receipts or pictures for everything inside the RV to enable assignment of value. Most things weren't new, so no handy pictures online. Things fall onto RV's all the time. Seeing a before picture is worth 1000 words to describe your well cared for RV. Remember the roof too! Hail can cause alot of damage. And if you don't have glass damage coverage for RV windshield you should add a rider. Some windshields can be VERY expensive and not all policies cover all glass claims.

 

OK, off my soap box. lol Thanks for sharing the link Linda!

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Please take pictures of everything with your cell, email to yourself. Find time to download all of them to a flash drive and put that with your GRAB FIRST bag.

In addition to multiple backups, I carry a thumb drive backup of my computer in my pocket at all times except when sleeping. Then it rests on the bedside table where I can grab it on awakening. If I'm OK so is my data.

 

Linda Sand

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Good info. Of course when I first read the topic all I could think of was to get off the levelers and make sure the air bags were set :)

 

:lol: :lol: :lol: That was about my first thought when I read the title.. "Get the X-Chocks off".

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  • 2 weeks later...

We were staying at the SKP Ranch near Roswell NM when a 4.2 quake hit back in 2011 in our Beaver. The rig started shaking, mostly up and down, but it felt like someone was trying to force open one of our basement doors. I rushed out to see who it was and the street was filled with other people just coming out of their rigs. It felt like going over a rough road but there was absolutely no damage to the rig or contents. It gave us a chance to talk to our neighbors. I suspect had the quake been stronger, perhaps a 6 or better, it could have caused damage if you had gear adrift.

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When I felt an earthquake in California it was mild enough I thought friends had found us and were rocking our rig. Dave was outside and said the road rolled like a roller coaster. I'm not sure how often you get any warning of an earthquake so my thought about the value if the link was about fastening things down in such a way that you don't need advance warning. The only other earthquake I remember feeling was in Minnesota and for that one the stove burners rattled and I thought it was a heavy truck going by. I am grateful to have never experienced a big one.

 

Linda Sand

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I'm not sure how often you get any warning of an earthquake so my thought about the value if the link was about fastening things down in such a way that you don't need advance warning.

 

Linda Sand

You don't. Sometimes animals start acting strange, but by the time you realize it the shaking has come and gone. I've gone through many earthquakes while living in the SF area and believe me there never was any warning.

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I agree about not much warning. Have been in Washington State, Idaho, Big Island Hawaii and California during earthquakes. Only one time have I heard a sound like a train before a quake hit. Shake, rolling or just abrupt up and down, they all haven't lasted long and sure make you aware of things not battened down. :)

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We had a 5.6 here a couple days ago. Shook the rig pretty well and lasted way too long. Gave us an idea of what the rig deals with going down the road and why we place items in in travel mode before moving. We're setting on a fairly new gravel pad and it settled a bit on one side so we were no longer level. I had to revisit the Level Up panel to straighten us out. Glad it was a little one.

Later,

J

PS With notice (ha ha) I would hook up the truck to help carry the load but all in all it did well.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Well today's earthquake at 5.0 was another little one but once again it got us out of level. Plan is tomorrow to hook up the pickup rise the feet and then add some larger foot print blocking (think snow shoes) before leveling up again. Currently we are wiggling way too much when we move about. So you never know and it is best to be prepared to roll in short order.

Later,

J

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A few days delay in posting this one. It was a 6.2 and once again shook the place right well though I was under the front bay door this time and not inside. The DW came out to see what the h... I was doing to cause the rig to shake so much. Anyway good news is that correcting the error of my way by placing larger blocking under the fat feet of our Level Up landing gear kept us from shaking-in deeper as the little plastic jobs seemed to be heading for China. Moral of the story is bigger feet are better.

Later,

J

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If the RV park has a bridge at or near the entrance to the park, you may want to check on how you may leave the facility if the bridge does not survive the Earthquake. It is always good to have a way out of the place you are staying if such an event happens.

Same with flooding, what do you do if the entrance is flooded??

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