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porky69

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    Coaldale,Alberta, Canada

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  1. Your new seats will probably have many, many extra mounting holes in the base. Worst case, cut the head off of the problem bolt and pick another hole nearby and mark it on the floor and either buy a kit to install a Nutsert (https://www.homedepot.com/p/Astro-Pneumatic-13-in-Nut-Thread-Hand-Riveter-Kit-with-Nosepiece-Set-AST1442/206859159) or find a local mechanic/fabricator that has them and have them install one for you. You would think that 3 bolts would be enough but you would be amazed at the forces on the base and over time the seat will rock a little and eventually come loose or break the other bolts, I have seen this happen.
  2. In the aftermarket seat world under $1000 is a relatively cheap seat truck shops don't bring in the expensive stuff cause it is a hard sell but you get what you pay for.....had a driver in the drilling rig moving company I managed who needed a "good seat" for his back and it cost us $3500cdn.....without heat or cooling.
  3. I put some Bostrom Wide Ride's with the low pro suspension, high seat back and dual arm rests in my 2000 379 Pete and loved them, but that was 15yrs ago. They were towards the lower end of the price spectrum but very comfy and well built. Unless you can find someone who has a particular seat installed in a similar model truck to yours it is just about impossible to tell how they will be in the real world just by sitting in them, something as simple as mounting them forward an inch can completely change how comfortable they are. There are a couple of things to be aware of with some lo-pro seat suspensions in some trucks......when I took the air out of mine, your butt was only about 6inches off the floor, I am 5'10" and could just nicely see over the dash and window sills (ie HAD to have air in them when driving in traffic or pretty much anywhere but open road) which to some insurance companies is a very bad thing....which is possibility #2 ... loss of insurance coverage due to the seats potentially not allowing proper visibility. Yes it is a long shot but we all know how insurance companies like to try and get out of paying. If you are going to adapt some automotive seats to air ride suspension, and I am not in any way condemning this, make sure you mount them at the right front to rear slope, if the front edge is to high and puts pressure on the back of your legs it can reduce blood flow to your lower legs and if it is to low you will always feel like you are sliding out. This is a purely personal thing, I like to have mine flat to slightly high, lots of people are the other way.And makesure the seat belts are securely mounted.
  4. Here on the prairies of southern Alberta we received approx 18inches of wet, heavy, crystal white snow between Saturday afternoon and early Monday morning. Here in Lethbridge and area (actually pretty much anything south of Hwy 1 from the Saskatchewan border to the BC border) it closed all schools, most roads/highways, cancelled city buses, closed university and college, etc. Even today many businesses even the shopping centers were still closed. Any non-main roads are pretty much impassable. Didn't get much more than 1 or 2 degrees below freezing. Supposed to be +7 celsius by Wednesday.....sloppy days here we come...... Had to quickly put the snowblower on the little tractor so I could clear us a path out. Snow is so wet and heavy it just about can't be blown.
  5. The grease zerk manifold behind the drivers side front spring should have I do believe 5 zerks..... I forgot about the 2 (one on each side) on the clutch fork pivots half way up the sides of the flywheel housing.
  6. Every truck is different, based on order specs and age of unit.So this is just a start..... You will have(going from memory as I owned a 2000 Peterbilt 379L about 15-17yrs ago): 1 or 2 on each brake s-cam tube(each wheel) 1 on each brake slack adjuster(each wheel) 2 front leaf spring shackle pins (rear of front leaf) each side 1 front spring pin(front of front leaf spring, right behind bumper)each side 1 output shaft of steering box 3 on steering shaft under hood (2 u-joints plus slip joint) 2 on drag link 2 tie rod ends steering king pins driveshaft u-joints and slip joints clutch throwout bearing(may either be hanging through inspection cover on bottom of flywheel housing or hose routed to group of grease zerks behind drivers side spring shackle)- do not over grease as this will contaminate your clutch brake making it not work. mechanical clutch linkage (inside frame under cab or hosed to group of grease zerks mentioned above)- only needs one shot per zerk hood hinges (if I recall correctly) Possibly engine fan clutch (yours should be new enough to be sealed for life) You may have more or less than what I have listed. For example it may have been ordered with Lubed For Life Driveline, which would eliminate u-joint and slip joint lube requirements.
  7. If you are willing to part with some cash you could always do these: Rotogrip Automatic Tire Chains or Onspot Automatic Tire Chains or Instachain Automatic Tire Chains They do reduce clearance requirements above but may need some more if you have low hanging tool/storage boxes. Oh....and as you may have guessed they are not cheap, but incedibly convenient- just flip a switch.
  8. Try calling Brokerlink in Calgary at 403.278.8811 ask for Susan. When we first got our Class 8 motorhome conversion we were having problems finding coverage (either affordable or at all) and she knew exactly what we had going on and was able to have us affordable, short term coverage to get our unit home while she setup our permanent coverage.They work with many insurance companies and can probably set you up. As an aside you may want to consider having the commercial fifth wheel hitch and trailer airlines/power cord removed before pickup as this may be enough to take you out of the "commercial" world and make it a "personal" vehicle.
  9. How old is your pump? These diaphragm style pumps don't last forever, if it is old enough or used often enough it is possible the diaphragm has cracked and will while it may pump water it may never produce enough pressure to shut itself off. Most pumps you can buy a rebuild kit for(and it takes longer to get the pump out of the camper than to install the rebuild kit) but I personally would replace if it come to that.
  10. If it is the Meritor Freedomline 12speed Autoshift then yes they can be a little tricky to get parts for, not impossible but not as easy as parts for a Fuller or Volvo I-Shift would be.
  11. FWIW......That is a VW TOUAREG, not a Tiguan. Mid-size vs compact. Still a ridiculously large trailer to tow behind it. Touareg's are rated for 3500kg (7700lb) towing and have a 2inch receiver with a 7pin plug from the factory(no brake controller installed, but wiring is provided). We had one and I couldn't imagine pulling a trailer half that size. Even our little garbage trailer (maybe 1500lbs) turned it into a fuel guzzling slug.
  12. Not sure but this could be related...https://www.hensleymfg.com
  13. I have only heard positive about the Centramatic rings and they are on my list of wants for my Haulmark truck conversion. As far as beads go I had the owner of the tire shop I used, when managing a oilfield trucking company, told me that they used 1.5 to 2 times the recommended weight of beads and that one of the biggest factors is to make sure that the inside of the tire is absolutely dry, as in no water or excess mounting lube inside (causes beads clump or stick either to them selves or to the tire/rim) and to ensure that the air used to inflate the tire is dry. He actually recommended beads over rings for most of his customers (most of them did a lot of non-paved road driving).
  14. Note that the corners on step cut of the frame rails are have a 3/4inch radius to reduce stress localization.
  15. Here is a link to the Volvo body builders manuals (the guide book truck equipment manufacturers/engineers would refer to for configuring/changing a Volvo truck). Volvo Body Builder Manual For frame stuff scroll down and click on Section 7 Frame and start reading, yes a lot of the stuff is pretty technical but they list welding procedures, etc. This manual has all sorts of technical info on VN series trucks (wiring, air system, suspension, fuel systems, etc). Every truck modification shop is going to have their own way of doing it and they will always tell you that their way is the best and they have never had a problem doing it their way, so you have to take it with a grain of salt. I personally wouldn't do a z-cut or any cut that has sharp corners in it as those corners are going to create stress risers (spots where stresses are higher due to not being evenly distributed).
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