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2 axle light weight travel trailes


Wally
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I am interested in 2-axle travel trailers of around 17 foot long, with one slide and possibly light weight variety.  It seems as thought the shorter travel trailers use only one axle and I want two axles (reduces shock to the trailer and contents as I travel gravel/dirt roads).  All the dealers tell me I don't "need" two axles...that is not the point...I "want" two axles.   I already have a 30 foot long model and want a smaller model, but one with two axles and possibly a small slide out.  Also. searching the manufactures sites seems difficult to key on 2 axles.

Any suggestions appreciated.

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One of the main reasons that so few RV manufacturers build small travel trailers with 2 axles is that the majority of buyers are looking for low prices and the second axle adds significantly to the price. The Winnebago Micro Minnie starts at $23k and the Escape 19 comes in at $32k. On the other hand, you can find new single axle travel trailers of that size for as low as $13k.

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Hi Kirk.  Thanks for the reply.  Adding an axle certainly adds to the cost of a unit, but I suspect the $10K to the $19 K differences in the units are more than just the cost of an axle.  I also suspect that most manufacturers just look at the weight requirements and decide that if one axle will carry weight, they will not add a second (anything to reduce the overall cost of production).  

Most of my mileage is spent on dirt/gravel roads rather than hard surfaces, and, in my experience, driving over a bumpy road with two axles  takes a lot of the shock out of the units structure. So, while the structures' weight may not require a second axle to support the load, I want a second axle to support and cushion that load.  And, like you said, to find that a much higher price may be involved.  Happy trails,  Wally

 

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5 hours ago, Wally said:

I suspect the $10K to the $19 K differences in the units are more than just the cost of an axle. 

I didn't mean to imply that I believe the price change is all due to the second axle, but that the reason there are so few who build 2 axle trailers in the smaller models is that most of them are built to sell to the lower price buyers. The Escape is clearly not aimed at the most price limited market. 

5 hours ago, Wally said:

So, while the structures' weight may not require a second axle to support the load, I want a second axle to support and cushion that load. 

Having towed both 1 axle and 2 axle trailers a lot over the years, I absolutely agree with you that 2 axles if much preferred for handling and stability. We now tow one of the smaller, lower-priced travel trailers and I would have preferred to have two axles, but was not willing to go up in price enough to get one. As far as I can find, nobody builds a travel trailer in the lowest cost/size/quality marketplace that has two axles. 

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