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2004 dodge 48re Temperature


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Purchased this truck a few months ago. 2004 3500 diesel drw 48re automatic transmission 72,000 miles on her. Within the first week of ownership, I had an oil change, transmission fluid changed to synthetic, oil temperature sensor installed in the case and so on.

She now has 75,000 miles on her. Pulling a 16,000 lb fifth wheel up some hills toward Salthouse Campground Henry, VA the tranny temperature went up to 215 for 15 to 20 minutes. Usually reads around 180. Do I have a reason to be concerned?

Thanks,

Al

 

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What was your engine temperature running?  Not sure on your Dodge but many run the transmission fluid through the engine radiator thus the two usually track pretty close to one another.  Certainly not unusual for engine temperature to run up to 215 on a good pull.  My MH will with a 165 thermostat will easily reach 210 on a long pull if I don't down shift and keep the RPM up around 1800-2000 rpm.

Regardless, an auxiliary cooler wouldn't hurt.

Lenp

USN Retired
2012 F150 4x4

2018 Lincoln MKX

2019 HD Ultra Limited

 

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I don't know if Dodge uses similar guidelines, so take this for what it's worth. I tow with a Ford F-350 truck, and the recommendations I follow are these:

"Ford's standard is up to 220 is normal and you can run all day at that temp, and you can run up to 250 for up to 30min at a time. You should not exceed 250 if at all possible as there are some internal components that don't like to behave properly above 250."

That being said my "normal" towing temperature is around 180 - 195 degrees and I seldom see an increase above 200 for any length of time. On long, steep pulls on hot days I have seen it reach 215 but once the fan clutch kicks in things tend to come back down pretty quickly. 

Mark & Teri

2021 Grand Designs Imagine 2500RL, 2019 Ford F-350

Mark & Teri's Travels

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Engine coolant a little over 200 transmission 215 pulling a good hill for about 5-miles on a country rd  at 20-25 mph. For the time being, going with a HD auxillary transmission cooler, avoid grades where possible and keep an eye on it.

Appreciate the replies.

Al

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One issue is with the synthetic oil in it.  Drag racing the Cummins engines and 48re combo's found that the synthetic oil in the trans was literally too slippery for the bands and clutches and torque converter.  Even though you're in lockup, the synthetic would let everything slip creating more heat.  Swapped back to dino blend and it ran tighter.

Adding another cooler helps, put a gauge on the output side of the trans before it runs thru the block cooler.... it's hotter than the 220 showed.  Your temp gauge in the pan is on the return side AFTER it has been thru the cooling system.

Geno's garage may have the inline output side fitting you can measure at.  www.genosgarage.com

Jim's Adventures

Old Spacecraft.... Who knows whats next

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Ideally the trans temp should not exceed 200 deg., the worst cause of excess heat is to run up a hill too fast with a heavy load, it's best to just slow down. There is a good web site on the 48re which recommends synthetic oil and consider an extra capacity deep oil pan which also will allow the oil to cool down and rest. There is a concern about added cooling radiators since they also don't allow the trans to get to proper temp on cold days. If you do go with an added cooling radiator, consider a bypass system with valves to isolate on cool and non pulling drives. http://etereman.com/blog/fiat-transmission/the-heavy-duty-chrysler-48re-transmission-can-be-broken

 

Greg

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