Jump to content

Question about "diesel monitoring system"


coachmac9

Recommended Posts

I have noticed a couple of these units for sale in another part of this site and was wondering what exactly does this "monitor" and is it worth the investment. I am new to diesel ownership and would like to hear from those who have experience with them. Thanks!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here's my 2 cents. When we first started with our first (and only) RV we were green weenies (totally new to RVing). I added several gauges to the 2007 F350 to monitor the diesel, it seemed like the thing to do, When I replaced it with a 2014 F350 I considered additional gauges or a more compact monitoring system such as a Bully Dog. After several years towing all over the US and some of Canada I decided to forgo a monitoring system on the 2014 for a year. I have easily decided to add nothing to the new truck based on my experience and confidence in the truck. I believe this would apply to Ram or GM diesels also. Maybe the motorhome owners have a different opinion. Greg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I agree they are neat to have, had aftermarket gauges in my modified Dodge CTD; but for a stock engine the are unnecessary. For instance, if the turbocharger pressure for the intake begins to fail, you will notice a drop in power-without a gauge. Now with a modified engine, to increase HP, exhaust temperature gauges are necessary to alert the driver before overheating the exhaust; 1,300*F is where the valves begin to melt, but a stock engine has been engineered to stay within design limits.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If you have a diesel pusher the gauges can be inaccurate just due to the long distance from the dash back to the engine. I used a VMSPC which gets the info directly from the engine computer and really liked having the information and being able to set up custom gauges and alarms.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have had the VMSpc system for over 12 years running on a 15' laptop on the dash. I never need to look at my dash speedometer, or gauges anymore.

When manual shifting in hills I always know what gear it is in. Have a audio alarm if anything monitored goes out of whack.

It has a built in maintenance schedule you can set up.

 

Anytime the check engine light come on. You can check the VMSpc for what the problem code is.

 

Yes the VMSpc is well worth the investment if you want to know what is going on with the engine and also the transmission.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Good to hear the other side of the discussion...biker we have almost the same RV as you, is there anything I need to look for or be aware of with this drive train or coach? We are not the original owners but from all the records that came with the coach I think it was very well taken care of.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The only thing to beware of is if you have the B block. They can crack. I have one in mine.

Just take it slow when warming it up from cold and you should be OK.

 

And the ISB has a tendency to crack the exhaust manifolds on them. I had to replace one.

Other then that you will love the 10 + MPG if driven under 60 MPH.

 

If it starts to heat up when climbing hills. Manually downshift and keep RPM's above 2,100

Or if it hasn't been done. Extend the slobber tube and clean the CAC from the backside.

 

You may want to have a low pressure fuel pump light put on, if past owners didn't have that done.

A lot cheaper then having to replace the injector pump.

 

Enjoy your D. It is good for many more years of use.

 

Check out the Discovery owners $$ for info & help when needed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the tips and the Discovery owners group has already been a great benefit...one of the hinges on the door was broken and I found out that they are no longer made (by the original manufacter) they put me in touch with someone who sells a beefed up version. Problem solved!! We absolutely love the coach. Safe travels and hope to meet you on the road!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll give you another opinion that will be contrary to adding a monitoring system.

 

Before you do anything understand that modern engines are computer controlled and monitored and will do nothing to themselves to cause engine damage. You will get warnings, messages, and finally limp mode so you can take action to repair the problem. Cummins uses the LBCU (it's a display panel) to interact with the engine computers to give the codes of what is wrong. Basically you have warning lights and messages to tell you what's wrong.

 

Getting one of the more sophisticated monitoring systems like the VMSpc allows you more virtual gauges and more things to look at while you are driving. More data doesn't always bring more clarity, however. You get distracted by more data, you worry about things that look "out of your expected range", you will get errors in the data (it is transmitted electronically from the engine computer and data glitches do occur). While the VMSpc is nice, it is just too much stuff and you really need to be focused on the road.

 

If you modify your engine, then all bets are off. If I did that, I would add the VMSpc in a heartbeat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

While the VMSpc is nice, it is just too much stuff and you really need to be focused on the road.

You are right. The VMSpc does tend to draw my eyes off the road once in a while, when also busy looking at the CoPilot GPS on my iPad mounted on the side drivers window.

And the S&T GPS running on the 15" laptop on a table beside the drivers seat.

Trying to watch the road doesn't give me much time to watch the DVR movie on the TV above the drivers seat either. It was easy to bypass factory that block out.

As I am busy texting or talking on my iPhone 6 Plus. Hardly gives me much time to check the rear view monitor of what is going on back there. :)

 

Safety first. :o

 

OH!!! I can still see the road when looking at the VMSpc sitting on the dash. Seeing what my Road Speed is takes less time then looking down on the dash behind the steering wheel where the OEM odometer is.

 

265861108.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My very very humble opinion. Analog gauges my not be as accurate as digital but in most cases they don't need to be. A quick glance tells you they are either operating in normal range, above normal, high, or into the red zone. For myself I prefer analog gauges as they are just easier to read. Add to that the various lights, bells, whistles, and buzzers that can warren you of impending doom and I'm pretty well set.

Now for trouble shooting then something like VMSpc is terrific. Even Scan D will do a better job of reading error codes. The day might come when I wish I had one of them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll go with the more is better. It;s great to have computers that won't let you harm them but into limp mode(and most of us being less than well educated on what is going wrong) these gadgets at leave give an indicatiion of what might be wrong. Giving an example: Into limp mode, great can get off freeway and to a safe place, but what the heck is the problem? Motor? Trans? boat anchor attached? Now with a $175 xtra gage setup(I'm using a scangage as an example) I saw very low boost pressure, OK I have a place to start, turbo system somewhere. Being a backyard Machanic I can at least look. MMM system leak?, Turbo itself, inter or charge cooler. Or at least when calling for help one could give pertanent info, not just it don't go answer. OK thats one point also seeing trouble before it gets to a breakdown on the road like climbing hills trans is getting close to max temp and without a gage no warning until shutdown. But because I saw this comming I could do something or explore possible bandades. These are fictional events but one can see so much with the xtra gages I spent the xtra couple of dollars. One thing I was more aware of the systems I was operating and could play with my 40000# toy, seeing in real time what a down shift manually did to cooling or fuel intake for the climb. Techno fun!

More info is better, but keep your eyes on the road too.

 

LEN

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

RV Cable Grip

RV Cable Grip

All the water you need...No matter where you go

Country Thunder Iowa

Nomad Internet

Rv Share

Dish For My RV.

RV Air.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

The Rvers- Now Streaming

RVTravel.com Logo



×
×
  • Create New...