Jump to content

Ladders


Bob Cochran

Recommended Posts

This sort of off topic it is. But a reminder when climbing up anything not just ladders.

 

Dust devil here at S & B knocked chimney stack cap off. No problem grab extension get on roof fix in 15 minutes and done. WRONG!!!!Ladder had dirt in side rails when putting ladder against roof fell on deck below ladder. I thought should clean that up ladder could slip. 15 minute job it can wait to clean up then. The last I remember was stepping one foot on roof one on ladder. Next thing I remember DW there asking the questions like what my name was with me flat on my back on the deck. Knocked out for few seconds but brains no more scrambled than normal. Little cut and blood but minor hard head damage. Ribs sore as heck and shoulder with impressive bruising on side below ribs. Xrays no broken bones, I was worried torn rotator cuff but only badly sprained shoulder. 3 weeks now and can FINALLY MOVE around. Moral of the story when young can bounce better, I mean bounce back faster. When "older" I am 68 soon not so much. Our balance is no what it used to be. So whether climbing around HDT or what ever it smarts for awhile if you fall. BE EXTRA CAREFUL I WAS LUCKY NOTHING BROKEN EXCEPT A LITTLE PRIDE SORENESS WILL GO AWAY.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I fell from roof 1.5 yrs ago, broke both wrists, split skull, Weadeater fell and broke 2 ribs on my back, flail rib injury, no Pneumo. 3 surgeries later.... The last one being last Wednesday.

Moral, stay off ladders and pay someone else the 1>200$ to replace stack clean gutters. Doug slipped of RV steps, did a face plant, can't speak to brain damage. 2 other contributors have fallen breaking a kneecap and the other a lower tib fib fracture.

I truly feel you pain, hopefully you heal without any lasting issues.

I hope you took lots of pictures...we could swap for the gory picture album.

Roger

 

August 3rd huh, mine's Aug 27....National, International fall month.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I used to climb utility poles for a living (when I was 19). Never fell but had a couple of close ones. The key was always knowing my limits and properly assessing and addressing the risks in every situation. I had a safety belt hanging from my hip that was for more than just swagger and it worked!

 

Spin forward to 1971. I am 28 and washing my inlaws Horizon MH. The borrowed (no-no #1) very old wooden stepladder (NO-NO #2) shattered! Left foot was on next to the top step, right foot was lightly placed on the paint tray (No-No #3) which instantly turned into kindling, quickly followed by the rest of the ladder while I was in free-fall.

 

I had just enough time (and sense) to curl my right elbow up to protect the right side of my head and I hit flat on my side and bounced. At 235 lbs, that surprised me but I bounced high enough that momentarily, I could see the top of the curb and sidewalk (I was in the street) before I settled back onto the pavement. That view still flashes in my mind everytime I touch a stepladder.

 

Nothing broke that they could find but my right hip socket has been a painful problem ever since, I guess so I will never forget.

 

I have a lot of things that need to be done on the roof right now but they remain as they have for months, unfinished. No place to fasten a proper safety belt up there and, yes, I admit it.... I am now, officially, a weeble-wobble on solid ground so going back up there, myself, is NO-NO #4.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I am really starting to look at everything I do in terms of the level of risk it presents. At 62 and in pretty good physical condition, but any significant injury could really put the kibosh on things. Ladders cost about 3 times the cost of parts and assembly because of the liability issues and lawsuits the manufacturers face. Hands down one of the most dangerous items the average person deals with.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I was lucky fell on Trex type deck no concrete I am sure some would have broke. I am 230 lbs even with my flab did not bounce much. Yes called a guy general contractor I use when I get lazy or over my head. While he could not come out for a few days $75 and fixed with lot less pain. Worked out well for hI'm as when he was here DW is going to have do some other projects I keep putting!!!!!

 

JUST BE CAREFUL CLIMBING. Oh my brother just called found out 6 months ago he took a fall out of cab OTR driver 40+ years, broken arm.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Your kidding about the Trex deck. Mine was trex, slick when wet. I have pictures of it. Planks were what we call 5 quarter, 1.25" thick by about 6 " wide. Color is greyish. Did the job 13 yrs ago, never needed maintenance, cost about 4k.

 

This is out of the Twilight Zone.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess should say Trex like. Mine is no sleek when wet so much as it is grained to resemble wood. If that makes sense. I think dirt of the ladder side rails caused bottom of ladder to slip out.

 

I have everything I can to the S&B to make this place maintenance free.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do have a small wood shop. I mostly do stuff for myself and friends. Something about smell of fresh saw dust I love. My next little project is to refurbish an antique table. The joint have come loose the hide clue need to be redone. The top had something caustic spilled on need refinish that. The table has 2 drop leafs that legs swing out to support them. Just need some time as always. Some think retirements nothing to do. HUH!!!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Right, small like Norm Abrams shop. My big tools are gone, small hand, electric and site tools are packed away in task specific foam lined Pelican cases of various sizes. No more lost, damage tools or missing parts in transit.

 

Loctite makes a lot of different anaerobic glues. There may be on which would work in that application. They cure thru lack of oxygen. I used them to glue a loose edge of P lam down to an already glued surface. It ate thru the contact cement and gave me a good bond.

If the joint can't come apart, you may be able to use a Hypodermic with a type of glue that can be heated up which makes it more runny then shoot it in with the hypo if the joint is tight.

 

Striping table tops can be tricky. Liquids can blow joints apart or cause veneer to delaminate. Some are using a type of sandblaster using plastic pellets, something like this is used to strip paint off aircraft.

 

Anyway, I'm sure you have it well in hand.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ok yesterday DW finds the RV washing machine of her dreams.........No problem........Super-boyee.....(me).......drives 156 miles loads said "Drean-machie" in the rig.......drives 156 miles back........Unloads Dream-machine on to hand truck and briskly walks BACWARDS to the shop AND..........proceeds to trip and FALL BACKWARDS while making sure that the "Dream-machine" and hand truck lands on my soft body while I grind my right elbow into the pea-gravel just before the HARD concrete apron at the shop doors.

 

The DW rushes over and carefully inspects the "Dream-machine and declares that it looks undamaged..........I am UNDER the "Dream-machine and meekly mutter that it has no dents or scratches from my soft-body cushion efforts and the little bit of my blood on the "Dream-machine will be easy to wash off while it is "fresh"............

 

DW pulls up on the hand truck handle while I push the "Dream-machine" and move it OFF of my soft body..........We load the "Dream-machine" back onto the hand truck and this time I push it FOREWARD..........

 

To day we will see if the "Dream-machine" will wash my blood off of my shirt and pants.............

 

Maybe I am not tough for retirement AND the RV-life after all ...........maybe I should consider something passive like ........Playing NFL Footballl........

 

The upside is that after the DW washed my blood off the "Dream-machine".........she put a HUGE gaze patch on my elbow and now I tell the boys that I just got nicked in a drive-by-shooting............

 

TRY........to be careful

 

Drive on........(after the first-aid)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

DT, you are fortunate it didn't happen at the Calgary Stampede chuck wagon races, if injured, they'd have dragged you out behind the barn and shot you.

 

Re drive by, these days that isn't too far fetched.

I hear ya Roger.....

 

The 'Dream-machine" operator had that look like...... IF the "Dream-machine" is damaged then.........FIRST I get to fix the thing then.......I get shot.....

 

Today I hid under the ole Freightshaker cleaning a and painting drive lines......... maybe the ole truck will just roll over me and she will get a new driver (slave)........

 

Be careful........

 

Drive on........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Right, small like Norm Abrams shop. My big tools are gone, small hand, electric and site tools are packed away in task specific foam lined Pelican cases of various sizes. No more lost, damage tools or missing parts in transit.

 

Loctite makes a lot of different anaerobic glues. There may be on which would work in that application. They cure thru lack of oxygen. I used them to glue a loose edge of P lam down to an already glued surface. It ate thru the contact cement and gave me a good bond.

If the joint can't come apart, you may be able to use a Hypodermic with a type of glue that can be heated up which makes it more runny then shoot it in with the hypo if the joint is tight.

 

Striping table tops can be tricky. Liquids can blow joints apart or cause veneer to delaminate. Some are using a type of sandblaster using plastic pellets, something like this is used to strip paint off aircraft.

 

Anyway, I'm sure you have it well in hand.

Thx for input all help appreciated. I still have some free standing machines, wood lath, drill press, no cabinet saw but one next step up from contractor type, rest are table top like planer, etc. I really miss my bandsaw but having hard time justification of getting another one.

 

Ok yesterday DW finds the RV washing machine of her dreams.........No problem........Super-boyee.....(me).......drives 156 miles loads said "Drean-machie" in the rig.......drives 156 miles back........Unloads Dream-machine on to hand truck and briskly walks BACWARDS to the shop AND..........proceeds to trip and FALL BACKWARDS while making sure that the "Dream-machine" and hand truck lands on my soft body while I grind my right elbow into the pea-gravel just before the HARD concrete apron at the shop doors.

 

The DW rushes over and carefully inspects the "Dream-machine and declares that it looks undamaged..........I am UNDER the "Dream-machine and meekly mutter that it has no dents or scratches from my soft-body cushion efforts and the little bit of my blood on the "Dream-machine will be easy to wash off while it is "fresh"............

 

DW pulls up on the hand truck handle while I push the "Dream-machine" and move it OFF of my soft body..........We load the "Dream-machine" back onto the hand truck and this time I push it FOREWARD..........

 

To day we will see if the "Dream-machine" will wash my blood off of my shirt and pants.............

 

Maybe I am not tough for retirement AND the RV-life after all ...........maybe I should consider something passive like ........Playing NFL Footballl........

 

The upside is that after the DW washed my blood off the "Dream-machine".........she put a HUGE gaze patch on my elbow and now I tell the boys that I just got nicked in a drive-by-shooting............

 

TRY........to be careful

 

Drive on........(after the first-aid)

I was lucky my hard head did no break the deck board was only tangled in ladder so DW paid attention to me.

Yup, as we get older we seem to have more soft body parts and less hard.......except our heads. ;)

 

I still can hear Dad saying, "Slow down and let your brain catch up with your a$$."

I sure can relate to that.

 

The undiscovered country here, is muscle memories still work like they always did but the whole superstructure that they are playing with has aged past Methuselah and can't function like a 20 year old's.

I for sure know about muscle memory. Especially now.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Re the clotheswasher, mine is a heavy sucker with the 120v dryer on a shelf above. Maybe 12" in between currently. I'm on the hunt for a shorter clothes dryer, 27", they are made.

 

The gameplan is to scrap the current dryer, raise the shelf it sits on to get the shorter dryer close enough to the ceiling to allow a deep Fischer Paykel dishwasher drawer in between. I can't wash dishes clean, squeaky clean even after rinsing them. There is enough space and the plumbing and electrical are right there. Some other member came up with the idea.

 

Just thinking.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

RV Cable Grip

All the water you need...No matter where you go

Country Thunder Iowa

Nomad Internet

Rv Share

Dish For My RV.

RV Air.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

The Rvers- Now Streaming

RVTravel.com Logo



×
×
  • Create New...