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Anyone using the digital TV Antenna's?


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Last year in Florida I picked up one of the indoor square pad type OTA antennas while in Florida. It worked very well in the location in Florida but when I got to Iowa I had less success with it than with a pair of 30+ year old Rabbit ears. This year when I returned to Florida I found the "Long Range Indoor/outdoor " unit on sale for about what I paid last year for the indoor only model so I purchased it. Again it worked great at the location in about the same place as the other one (inside). I have moved in Florida to a new spot where I will be for another two months and the TV is having a few issues with reception so I am considering mounting the antenna outside. What thoughts does anyone have about a temporary mount? I will not be mounting it directly to any part of the trailer, I might devise a mount for the truck but it is off site for a couple weeks so that is out for this weekend. I was able to see the Derby yesterday and hope we have a Triple Crown winner coming this year. That horse was pretty impressive at the end.

 

Rod

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Our slides have a 'lip' on the edges. A painter pole, some wood spring clamps (plastic now) and tie wraps to hole the antenna on the top. 2 segment pole, about 14', worked well attached to the ladder.

 

clamps - http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?partNumber=552510-281-59400CD&langId=-1&storeId=10151&productId=50137708&catalogId=10051&cmRelshp=rel&rel=nofollow&cId=PDIO1

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Our slides have a 'lip' on the edges. A painter pole, some wood spring clamps (plastic now) and tie wraps to hole the antenna on the top. 2 segment pole, about 14', worked well attached to the ladder.

 

clamps - http://www.lowes.com/ProductDisplay?partNumber=552510-281-59400CD&langId=-1&storeId=10151&productId=50137708&catalogId=10051&cmRelshp=rel&rel=nofollow&cId=PDIO1

Thanks Bill I will try that.

 

Rod

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First, there is no such thing as a Digital or HD antenna. It is the TV that converts the signal for the nice picture.

 

You can built a very nice antenna to receive the digital station from some coat hanger and a board.

 

http://makezine.com/projects/digital-tv-coat-hanger-antenna/

 

http://www.popularmechanics.com/culture/tv/how-to/a6608/build-your-own-digital-tv-antenna/

 

Have fun making a better antenna.

 

Ken

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All receiving areas are not equal. All directions are not equal.

WHAT?

I have a digital/HD/OTA antenna in our house and another in our rig. It's the only TV we get. No Cable.

So what the heck has that got to do with anything?

Well the identical antenna and TV in the house gets 12 channels.

The same setup in the rig in the driveway of our house gets 34.

How? What? Why?

Simply because the antenna in the house points one direction due to it being stuck in the window that points south while the one in the rig points west due to it being stuck in a different window.

If you have a rooftop antenna that can be rotated then you can select the direction that gets the most channels.

Move the antenna around in the rig and rescan each time you move it to find the most channels and/or the channels you want most.

75% of the time ours works best in the rig when we throw it on the passenger seat laying horizontally!!

The self same setup gets more or less channels as we move from campground to campground due to the number and strength of local TV broadcast towers.

Sometimes there are no channels available so we have DVD's, streaming and books to fill in the blanks.

If all else fails we find talking to each other a novel experience!!

Have fun

BnB

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Here's my solution for TV reception when in a fringe area. I purchased an aluminum mast on eBay. It's military surplus and consists of four foot sections of tubing that stack together. 12 sections cost about $75. I think I'm using about 6 sections in the photo.

 

This is at Bear Island campground in Big Cyprus National Preserve Florida.

AntennaMast_zps92a94e7f.jpg

 

MastSections_zps48228ea2.jpg

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Here's my solution for TV reception when in a fringe area. I purchased an aluminum mast on eBay. It's military surplus and consists of four foot sections of tubing that stack together. 12 sections cost about $75. I think I'm using about 6 sections in the photo.

 

This is at Bear Island campground in Big Cyprus National Preserve Florida.

AntennaMast_zps92a94e7f.jpg

 

MastSections_zps48228ea2.jpg

Nice lightening rod, especially this time of the year in good old FLA. Didn't get a chance to put the unit outside last weekend will start off with it on the ground pointed toward the weakest signal and see what happens. Hopefully I get off work next Friday before 2 AM Saturday like last week.

 

Thanks for the suggestion.

 

Rod

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It seems the best antennas for digital are the tried and true bat wing Winegards with the Wingman add on. When they made the change to HD the low VHF stations were eliminated as were most of the medium VHF stations. They were shifted to the UHF band. The UHF band is shorter range.

 

The digital signal is either good or no good. You do not get the weak, snowy or ghost pictures as with the old analog TV signal. The "digital" antennas are more sensitive to being aimed properly for the max signal.

 

The Winegard Sensar IV is the antenna of my choice. It has an internal panel to help aim and locate stations without the many scans of the TV to get to the right station area.

 

Of course, getting the antenna as high as possible on a portable pole will help greatly. Be sure and use a high quality quad-shielded coaxial cable to minimize signal loss for the antenna run.

 

Ken

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It seems the best antennas for digital are the tried and true bat wing Winegards with the Wingman add on. When they made the change to HD the low VHF stations were eliminated as were most of the medium VHF stations. They were shifted to the UHF band. The UHF band is shorter range.

There are still over 300 TV stations on either the lo-VHF (ch 2-6) or the hi-VHF (7-13) RF channels. Las Vegas has a station broadcasting on RF channel 3 for instance, and Albany, NY has one on RF channel 6.

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There are still over 300 TV stations on either the lo-VHF (ch 2-6) or the hi-VHF (7-13) RF channels. Las Vegas has a station broadcasting on RF channel 3 for instance, and Albany, NY has one on RF channel 6.

Yes, there are still some (small percentage) of the station still in the VHF bands and are generally low power stations. This is why the old bat wing still works good as it can pick up the VHF band. The Wingman enhances the UHF signals, but does make the antenna more directional.

 

Ken

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Yes, there are still some (small percentage) of the station still in the VHF bands and are generally low power stations. This is why the old bat wing still works good as it can pick up the VHF band. The Wingman enhances the UHF signals, but does make the antenna more directional.

 

Ken

 

RF channel 3 in the Las Vegas market is the NBC outlet, RF channel 6 in the Albany, NY market is the CBS outlet, and RF channel 7 in the NYC is the ABC outlet, just for a few VHF examples. None of them are low power.

 

You might find this spreadsheet at RabbitEars.info informative. Click on the arrow in the "RF Ch" column and do an ascending sort. Note that the majority of the 465 VHF channel broadcasters listed are major network outlets. Of course the Wingman yagi director array is a good addition to the batwing for enhanced UHF reception, but let's not write off VHF performance just yet.

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Yes, there are still some (small percentage) of the station still in the VHF bands and are generally low power stations.

Ken

According to the list that Dutch linked to, there are 1817 full power TV stations in the US and it's territories. 461 of these are VHF which is 25.6%.

 

The Winegard Batwing started life designed to favor the VHF channels. Once digital broadcasts started, Winegard developed the Wingman attachment to boost the UHF channels. They later came out with the Sensar IV which has the Wingman built in.

 

Considering that there actually is a fairly large percentage of VHF stations, one must not dismiss the VHF band.

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