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How are As on snowy roads?


Jimalberta

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We are going to be headed home to Canada next week and my question is ....what are DPs like to drive on snow and icy roads in case we encounter some of that? Because we bought the MH in the spring of last year I have never driven one on these road conditions...please advise....thanks.

 

My thoughts are because of the big heavy engine in the tear...traction should be pretty good. Not sure about the steers though.

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I have driven mine in snow a couple of times. The snow on the road wasn't much of a problem but keeping the wipers clear of ice build up was a major issue for me.

I could not get enough heat on the windshield to keep them clear. I ran the defrosters and defroster fans full blast and ran the furnace to get more heat in the cab but that wasn't enough. Both times I was on two lane roads with minimum shoulders so pulling off was a bad option. I did anyway, ran around to the front and cleared the wipers and ran back and started up again. I was lucky I was in the west on roads without very much traffic but it was still a pucker string stretching experience.

Both times were when we were trying to get to sick family members. After the second time I told my wife that was the l last time I would drive in snowy weather in the motor home.

I lived in Co for 12 years and NH for 18 years. My commute in NH was 112 miles round trip so I have plenty of experience driving in snowy and icy conditions.

If you feel like you have to make the trip and there is a good possibility of blowing snow I would see if winter wipers are available for your rig. Even those are not a complete solution but they might help.

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Never tried it in a motor home with a big windshield, but if it is just snowing and the roads are dry or snow packed the best bet is to keep the windshield cold. Harder to do today as they spread so much stuff on the roads they are almost always wet & slushy, but back in the day I would put a rolled up towel along the base of the windshield to keep the warm air from leaking up and melting the snow hitting the windshield.

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It depends. How heavy is the coach. I have driven my coach in the snow several times without a single problem, but then my coach is heavier than a Greyhound bus and we all know how they drive in snow. You just have to be extra cautious. I actually did not have the snow buildup problem on the wipers but I was not driving while heavy snow was still falling. A heavy coach is not as affected by snow, similar to a tractor trailer truck (which I also used to drive through the northeast in the winter). The lighter coaches will have more problems just as they are more affected by cross winds and trucks passing.

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I meant more the GVWR rather than axle ratings. It does sound as though your coach is somewhat lighter than mine. Mine is 52000 pounds. Just be careful. Dry snow is fairly easy to drive in, but this time of year there is little if any dry snow. It's all the wet variety, which is "slicker than snot" as the saying goes.

 

I do not believe the tag has much bearing on the drivability in snow as it is not a drive axle, just a weight bearing axle.

 

Just don't drive as though you HAVE to get there NOW! Usually the snow that falls does not last long on road surfaces this time of year. I found my steers did a great job of holding the road, even driving in that wet stuff last year.

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Those are my actual weights on a scale.... its rated heavier than that. I mentioned the tags because the tags if deployed would remove some traction from the drive tires. If I had tags I would lift them on wintery conditions to get all the weight onto the drive axle.

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Ok thanks for the answers guys. No one directly answered my question but I guess I'll take it from here. I am assuming that DPs handle pretty good traction wise with there being a lot of weight on the rear axle. Kinda like the old VW beetles with their rear engines....they had/ have very good traction.

 

I dont carry chains so I'll have to avoid the high passes if possible or wait out rotten weather.

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Jim:

 

The obvious answer to your question is "go home later rather than sooner!" :D I know you folks in AB can get snow in any month, but that's why we don't even begin our trek north until the end of March. We won't get to Canada this summer until the end of June; by then I hope the snow will be melted!

 

Joel

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I have driven our MH while seeing snow along-side the road, but never ON the road. I've never had a pressing reason to drive in slick weather yet.

Front axle is 12,000 lbs. rear is 19,500. No tag.

 

Hi Jim,

I just noticed your MH picture. Paint scheme appears similar to mine. Different mfrs, one year difference, swirls in different ends.

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We are in Dillon, Montana now and we have hit a nice window of dry roads and warm weather so its not an issue any more. We will be home tomorrow...looking forward to getting back into my garage. Wife is starting to stress already about everything waiting to be done this summer. Lol

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