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2009 F150


spindrift

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Looking for some help for a friend. I can't seem to logically calculate the maximum trailer weight for his truck. I'm trying to use Ford's towing table but I think I'm confusing matters more than I'm helping. The truck is a Super Crew Cab with the 5.4L engine and 3.55 gears. He tells me he weighed his current Eagle TT and it came in at 8,260#. According to my calculations, and the tow table, the truck should be able to handle this unit. Honestly, the trailer seems too heavy to me. My buddy tells me that the truck doesn't feel capable of pulling the load so he's looking to downsize. Without anything to back me up, I'd feel more comfortable seeing him in a trailer that tops out, loaded, in the 7,000 - 7,500# range. Where am I going wrong? I'm Assuming the truck is in good mechanical condition.

 

Thanks for any feedback.

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According to this 2009 Ford Towing Guide, http://www.fleet.ford.com/resources/ford/general/pdf/towingguides/09RVTTguide.pdf, and F-150 Super Crew Cab with a 5.4L engine and 3.55 gear ratio, has a conventional trailer towing capacity of 9,800# with the 145" wheelbase, or 9,700# with the 157" wheelbase...IF IT'S A 4X2 (which you didn't mention). If it's a 4x4, then the towing capacities are 9,700# and 9,600# respectively.

 

Note that these maximums "...assumes a towing vehicle with any mandatory options, no cargo, tongue load of 10-15% (conventional trailer) ... and driver only (150 pounds). Weight of additional options, passengers, cargo and hitch must be deducted from this weight. ..."

 

So, in *real life* what the truck can tow will be something less than the 9,600# - 9,800# shown in the table. If the 8,260# weight of your friend's trailer is the LOADED weight, then he'll probably be OK, but will most likely be near the top of what his truck can handle. He should, of course, have a weight distribution hitch with sway control. That assumes, of course, that the length of the trailer is appropriate for whatever the wheelbase of his truck is.

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3:55 by itself is way too low. Without even crunching no's the truck won't cut it. IMO I would look at changing the truck more than the rig. Also it depends on the towing conditions and locations. I am towing in his range with a Chev. 2500HD with the 6.0L engine and a 4:10 rear end and sometimes it is not really enough. I travel out west to NM most summers and some other areas in the mountains and I sometimes need to do strategic driving due to elevation or headwinds. Sometimes even bad side winds.

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  • 5 months later...

I tow with an '02 F150, 5.4, 3:55 differential, two wheel drive, it's rated to tow 8,300 lbs. My trailer is 3,200 empty, probably 5,000 the way we load it, and truck pulls it fine, but I definitely know it's back there. I do about 60 mph on interstate, 50-55 on regular roads. Safety is indeed #1.

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  • 1 month later...

My husband had an F150 4x4 5.4 , I don't know the gearing, and he pulled a trailer weight listed at 5500 lbs. Truck was in good mechanical condition, and we used it through the Appalachian Mtn chain. It pulled it well, but husband felt it wld take too much of a toll on the truck over time, gas mileage was 7-8 mpg hilly terrain, 10-12 flat..... so, we now have an F350 diesel dually which pulls the same trailer like there is nothing back there. Hope this helps a bit.

 

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I use my 1/2 for a toad. Would not use it to pull more than a utility trailer. The chassis and suspension on 1/2 tons are more like cars than trucks. Mine for example has P rated tires and pretty soft suspension. If you want handling and safety please consider a 3/4 ton as a minimum.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Another option is to change the differential from the 3.55:1 to a 4.10:1 - along with the gear change, there is a change necessary to the odometer/speedometer sensor. I did this mod to a Chev 3/4-ton van that came with a 3.08:1 rear end a number of years ago (I sold the van in 2005).

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