Jump to content

Resume


JPtravel

Recommended Posts

We built a workamping resume that includes both of us but some of the jobs require you to apply separately. (ie National park job) Do you use the Workamper resume or make individual resumes? We are new at this and have only worked in the oil fields as gate guards.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Originally, I had made a single resume, listing the info for both of us (before I ever decided if/who I would submit an application to).

 

Since the one workamper job my wife and I have done required not only separate applications, but separate email addresses to submit the applications, I split my original single resume into two. It wasn't difficult.

 

I thought it was silly to have to use separate email addresses for each of us to apply.

 

Don

Link to comment
Share on other sites

We built a workamping resume that includes both of us but some of the jobs require you to apply separately. (ie National park job) Do you use the Workamper resume or make individual resumes?

First of all, let me welcome you to the Escapee's open forums! We are happy to have you join in and will do all that we can to assist you.

 

Are you thinking of paid positions or of RV volunteer ones such as campground hosts or positions on our national wildlife refuges, national parks, and the Corps of Engineers, which are basically volunteer positions with a supplied campsite & utilities? The national parks and wildlife refuges have some seasonal employees who are paid positions and those each one must apply as an individual and you may have only one of the two actually receive a job offer. Those do require completely separate resumes and applications. On the other hand, if you are thinking of the RV volunteer positions where you are not paid at all or receive just a small stipend, those are normally one application & resume for a couple. We have done more than 30 different tours as RV volunteers for campsite (sometimes there are other benefits as well) and in such situations they normally only have one application and resume for each couple and they fill the positions in that same way.

 

Nearly all state park agencies also supply RV sites to volunteers as campground hosts as well as many also having positions for maintenance assistance and some for those who do interpretive work. Many of our national parks use volunteers in interpretive positions such as naturalists, visitor center staff, leading nature walks and historic tours. We have spent time on 11 different national wildlife refuges where we have done things like lawn and field mowing, minor construction, public contact & visitor center work, wildlife studies, and a wide variety of other things. It has been a wonderful experience and it does stretch the budget since you don't pay for your site but there is no rate of pay and only a few such places still offer a stipend due to the tight budgets of public agencies.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for everyone's input. We have been enjoying the site for awhile.

I guess we have a different meaning for Workamper. By no means would I consider a job paying $8.00 or so a "professional" job. We are no where near retirement age but recently started full time RV with the thought of finding seasonal jobs that pay and have a RV site. We would like to go Glacier, Yellowstone, Grand Canyon, dude ranches and open to other possibilities. We have seen many of these places and thought we would like to work and play at some of them. We are working on 2 separate Workamper resumes now. Thanks to all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While it can be difficult to find paid work for the park service, there are vendors who hire workers and do supply an RV site as well as the many commercial RV parks which also supply a site with pay. There is a magazine in which many of them advertise as do many other organizations who seek RV people for seasonal work. I would suggest that you check out the magazine Workamper News as a possible source of places to go. We found it to be by far the largest such listing of both paid and volunteer positions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Kirk was nice enough to send me one and I used it to put one together for us. Thank you again, Kirk.

I was happy to do so and would gladly share it with others if they supply an email address. I had considered posting it on our website but decided that would be a little much in the public uncontrolled arena. One day I may go in and device a purely fictional resume that is comparable to post, but so far have not put in the work.

 

Bob, if you are interested, drop me a PM and I'll share ours with you. Always remember when building any resume, if the recipient does not read it the document is useless and most employers read no more than two pages.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 months later...

We are thinking of work-camping while being on the road. Not sure what we'll do but want to keep busy. I know resumes are required but somewhat concerned as our work experience won't align with most positions available. How does one fill out a resume that fits the job description? Example; light maintenance work needed - my background is engine / transmission engineering / manufacturing. Not a good fit. Am I capable of operating a lawnmower or a leave blower, painting etc? Sure, I've owned and maintained a home.

 

How do you make the music match the lyrics? Any hints on a general resume?

 

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rudy, welcome to the Escapee forums! It is great having you become a part of things here.

 

If all that you are thinking is to keep busy may I suggest that you consider the RV volunteer lifestyle? We spent 12 years fulltime and would typically spend a month or two in travel and then stop in some public park or nonprofit agency and volunteer in return for our site and utilities for anywhere from one to four months, then move on to the next place. We spent most time at national wildlife refuges but we also stopped at both state and national parks and several other more unique locations. I invite you to take a look at some of the places that we volunteered as you can see pictures of what we experienced and read a brief summary of each one.

 

Whether you are looking for paid positions or the volunteer type, most potential employers are not expecting people with a lot of experience in the particular work that you will be doing but only for willing workers who are expecting to learn and in most cases who also enjoy public contact. We found that at many of the wildlife refuges we did very little work with the public while in parks we did a lot. We also found that most of the places that we spent time also offered opportunities to learn new things and to have experiences that we could never have had in any other way. We do use a resume, but it is short and very general and we give references to places that we have volunteered in the past or similar types of locations/people. If you wish, drop me a private note with your email address and I will be happy to share our resume with you, for an example of what has worked well for us.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...