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ACA plans and prices up for 2018

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For us the thing that really puts the price in the stratosphere is the need to buy a PPO for out of state coverage. Each year the PPO options in Michigan seem to decrease and those they at available are by far the most expensive offerings. 

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Howdy!

We just got the 2018 health care rates form my retired lovely wife’s employer (AT&T) and nexts years rate doubled. Only good news is the VA provides my health care needs.

”Happy Trails”

 Chiefneon 

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FL ACA BlueCross BlueShield EPO plans are still available in 2018. However, a quick scan of several counties indicated about a 17% increase in premium cost.

BTW, the HealthSherpa web site is still showing 2017 plans & plans for comparison's sake.

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Florida Blue has two types of EPO plans on the exchange:  BlueSelect and BlueOptions.  My understanding is that the difference between the two is the size of the network--BlueOptions has a larger network than BlueSelect, and the premiums reflect that (for plans with the same coverage (deductible, coinsurance, etc.), a BlueOptions plan will be more expensive than a BlueSelect plan). 

But I'm pretty sure the networks they're referring to are within Florida.  But for a fulltimer who expects to spend little or no time in Florida, I'm thinking the size of the network in Florida wouldn't really matter IF the network in the states other than Florida is the same for both BlueSelect and BlueOptions

But I can't find anything about the nationwide network other than tools to look up various providers, which isn't helpful if I'm just trying figure out if BlueSelect and BlueOptions have the same national (other than Florida) network.  I'm sure the vast majority of people signing up for Florida Blue don't care about providers in other states, so it's not a priority for Florida Blue to provide information about national network.

If the national network is the same for both BlueSelect and BlueOptions, it might be worth it to forgo a bigger network in Florida in order to pay a lower premium.  And if the national network isn't the same, it would be important to know what each network actually is in order to choose between BlueSelect and BlueOptions.

So does anyone have definitive information on the outside-of-Florida network that is available under BlueSelect and/or BlueOptions?

 

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1 hour ago, Blues said:

Florida Blue has two types of EPO plans on the exchange:  BlueSelect and BlueOptions.  My understanding is that the difference between the two is the size of the network--BlueOptions has a larger network than BlueSelect, and the premiums reflect that (for plans with the same coverage (deductible, coinsurance, etc.), a BlueOptions plan will be more expensive than a BlueSelect plan). 

But I'm pretty sure the networks they're referring to are within Florida.  But for a fulltimer who expects to spend little or no time in Florida, I'm thinking the size of the network in Florida wouldn't really matter IF the network in the states other than Florida is the same for both BlueSelect and BlueOptions

But I can't find anything about the nationwide network other than tools to look up various providers, which isn't helpful if I'm just trying figure out if BlueSelect and BlueOptions have the same national (other than Florida) network.  I'm sure the vast majority of people signing up for Florida Blue don't care about providers in other states, so it's not a priority for Florida Blue to provide information about national network.

If the national network is the same for both BlueSelect and BlueOptions, it might be worth it to forgo a bigger network in Florida in order to pay a lower premium.  And if the national network isn't the same, it would be important to know what each network actually is in order to choose between BlueSelect and BlueOptions.

So does anyone have definitive information on the outside-of-Florida network that is available under BlueSelect and/or BlueOptions?

 

Yes the EPO networks are FL only, but when out of state these plans are a PPO.  That's why these plans are considered both an EPO and a PPO, as explained earlier in the post "Moving to Florida". When traveling out of state both plans use BCBS's national provider network called the BlueCard program. 

Here's a link for a different carrier that does a much better job of explaining the BlueCard program than FL Blue does:

http://national.horizonblue.com/plans/bluecard-ppo

Also the size of the networks is not the only reason for the difference in cost between BlueSelect and BlueOptions plans.  Read my post from last year:

 

Edited by saydiver

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Thanks so much for the info. Your link in your previous post to the BC fact sheet is helpful, but as you noted, it still doesn't explain about the EPO network.  It's inexcusable that a person has to dig to find out how these plans actually work, and no offense to you (I value your input), but it's still not anything concrete from the horse's mouth.

And it matters.  Never mind actually understanding what it is you're buying--I did a "compare" thing on two plans and they were identical in all but one of the 60 items listed, and the premiums for the two plans are $694 for BlueSelect and $965 for BlueOptions.  It's a bit hard to make an informed decision on whether to spend 40% more for BlueOptions with the information that's available.

Well, except this is from a fulltimer's view, which is always more difficult.  If a person lives in Florida and worries only about the local network, especially if that person already has doctors, it wouldn't be anywhere near as hard.  But that person would have more companies and plans to choose from, which would make the decision harder.  One thing about fulltimers--we don't have that problem. 

 

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5 hours ago, Blues said:

Thanks so much for the info. Your link in your previous post to the BC fact sheet is helpful, but as you noted, it still doesn't explain about the EPO network.  It's inexcusable that a person has to dig to find out how these plans actually work, and no offense to you (I value your input), but it's still not anything concrete from the horse's mouth.

And it matters.  Never mind actually understanding what it is you're buying--I did a "compare" thing on two plans and they were identical in all but one of the 60 items listed, and the premiums for the two plans are $694 for BlueSelect and $965 for BlueOptions.  It's a bit hard to make an informed decision on whether to spend 40% more for BlueOptions with the information that's available.

Well, except this is from a fulltimer's view, which is always more difficult.  If a person lives in Florida and worries only about the local network, especially if that person already has doctors, it wouldn't be anywhere near as hard.  But that person would have more companies and plans to choose from, which would make the decision harder.  One thing about fulltimers--we don't have that problem. 

 

Read my post from last year.  BlueSelect and BlueOptions plans are not identical.

Believe me I totally understand you not wanting to take my word for it.  In my opinion Fl Blue does a terrible job of providing understandable info for the customer.  In fact in my experience of having worked for another BCBS for over 28 years, they are the worse insurance company I have ever dealt with.  I've had all kinds of problems with them along with several hundred, if not thousands, of other people last year when they suddenly denied our policies when they changed their membership/billing system.  Go to their Facebook page and read the Visitor Posts from late last year. Fl Blue out sources many departments including their customer service department and I had to spend hours on the phone with their outsourced customer service department in the Dominican Republic I believe, where English was not the primary language of most of their customer service reps I talked to, trying to get them to understand what they did and to reinstate my policy.  Luckily I'm healthy so having no insurance for a few months wasn't an issue for me unlike other people who needed their insurance to pay for needed medication, surgery etc. Last December we filed for a plan change and it took them over 7 months to issue us new insurance cards.  The national Blue Cross Blue Shield Association has ID card issuance standards and taking seven months is absolutely ridiculous. With those issues and a few others, I even filed a complaint with the FL Insurance Dept., but it was a waste of time, since most everyone else has pulled out of FL.  In fact for our county they are the only option for ACA insurance. 

Go to FL Blue's website, instead of looking at their plan info elsewhere.  Then you will see the plans are listed as PPO/EPO or better yet call a FL insurance broker and ask about the BlueCard program.  If they don't understand, then hang up and call someone else.

I can't find PPO/EPO BlueOptions plan 1705's 2018 policy document, but here's the contract link page.  

https://www.floridablue.com/plancontracts/individual


 

 

 

 

 

Edited by saydiver

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With regard to the cost estimates given by Healthcare.gov, if your rate is based on getting subsidies and if your spouse is on Medicare or otherwise getting their own insurance, the stated rate is wrong. See here.  http://xpostfactoid.blogspot.com/2017/10/alert-healthcaregov-plan-preview-tool.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Xpostfactoid+(xpostfactoid)

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7 hours ago, saydiver said:

Read my post from last year.  BlueSelect and BlueOptions plans are not identical.

I said there were 60 different items listed when I clicked "compare plans," and they were identical for all but one of them.  And I think it's what you mentioned in your other post (although it's impossible to be sure because of how things are worded).

The only item that is different between BlueSelect and BlueOptions is "Laboratory outpatient and professional services":

For BlueSelect, it has:

In Network: No Charge After Deductible

Out of Network: Benefit Not Covered

 

For BlueOptions, it has:

In Network: No Charge After Deductible

Out of Network: 50% Coinsurance after deductible

 

That's the only difference I could find, buried in there.  And I still don't know what it means.

I went to the Florida Blue website and compared these same two plans, and they didn't even have an item called "Laboratory outpatient and professional services."  But everything that was listed was identical for BlueSelect and BlueOptions.

I also looked at the (2017) plan documents for each of these policies, and they were almost identical.  I did find this in the BlueSelect plan:

BlueSelect Network means, or refers to, the Provider network comprised of both Preferred Providers and Exclusive Providers, established and so designated by us, which is available to BlueSelect members under this Contract. Please note that our Preferred Patient Care (PPC) preferred provider and NetworkBlue networks are not available to BlueSelect members under this Contract.

Again, no clue what it means.  And the prescription drug program has different names (BlueSelect Pharmacy Program and BlueScript Pharmacy Program, but other than the name, the pages in both plans are identical. 

There is absolutely nothing anywhere that would tell people about any actual differences, so I'm greatly indebted to you for pointing them out.  I can't believe people are expected to choose among products they know nothing about, and have no real source for finding out what it is they're buying.  The plan documents are impenetrable, and they're for 2017, not 2018, anyway.

Not to brag, but I'm a relatively intelligent person with a lot of education.  What are people who are stupid or didn't spend three years in law school learning how to parse statutes supposed to do?

Actually, they'll do like me, and just sign up for some policy, pay $1,000/month for it, and hope it all works out okay.

 

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1 hour ago, Blues said:

I said there were 60 different items listed when I clicked "compare plans," and they were identical for all but one of them.  And I think it's what you mentioned in your other post (although it's impossible to be sure because of how things are worded).

What are people who are stupid or didn't spend three years in law school learning how to parse statutes supposed to do?

If you're not a health insurance broker, then you do the research.

Pretty much the same strategy for any area you're unfamiliar with.

 

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10 hours ago, Blues said:

I said there were 60 different items listed when I clicked "compare plans," and they were identical for all but one of them.  And I think it's what you mentioned in your other post (although it's impossible to be sure because of how things are worded).

The only item that is different between BlueSelect and BlueOptions is "Laboratory outpatient and professional services":

For BlueSelect, it has:

In Network: No Charge After Deductible

Out of Network: Benefit Not Covered

 

For BlueOptions, it has:

In Network: No Charge After Deductible

Out of Network: 50% Coinsurance after deductible

 

That's the only difference I could find, buried in there.  And I still don't know what it means.

I went to the Florida Blue website and compared these same two plans, and they didn't even have an item called "Laboratory outpatient and professional services."  But everything that was listed was identical for BlueSelect and BlueOptions.

I also looked at the (2017) plan documents for each of these policies, and they were almost identical.  I did find this in the BlueSelect plan:

BlueSelect Network means, or refers to, the Provider network comprised of both Preferred Providers and Exclusive Providers, established and so designated by us, which is available to BlueSelect members under this Contract. Please note that our Preferred Patient Care (PPC) preferred provider and NetworkBlue networks are not available to BlueSelect members under this Contract.

Again, no clue what it means.  And the prescription drug program has different names (BlueSelect Pharmacy Program and BlueScript Pharmacy Program, but other than the name, the pages in both plans are identical. 

There is absolutely nothing anywhere that would tell people about any actual differences, so I'm greatly indebted to you for pointing them out.  I can't believe people are expected to choose among products they know nothing about, and have no real source for finding out what it is they're buying.  The plan documents are impenetrable, and they're for 2017, not 2018, anyway.

Not to brag, but I'm a relatively intelligent person with a lot of education.  What are people who are stupid or didn't spend three years in law school learning how to parse statutes supposed to do?

Actually, they'll do like me, and just sign up for some policy, pay $1,000/month for it, and hope it all works out okay.

 

As with anything you need to look at the actual contract to know what you're actually signing up for.  My county doesn't offer BlueSelect, but I put in the zip for Sumter county where Escapees is located and pulled up the contract for Plan 1735, a BlueSelect Bronze HSA plan.  On page 5 is the info on Exclusive Provider Services. 

The average person should probably talk to a FL insurance broker, before signing up for FL Blue insurance.

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On 10/27/2017 at 9:19 AM, saydiver said:

As with anything you need to look at the actual contract to know what you're actually signing up for.  My county doesn't offer BlueSelect, but I put in the zip for Sumter county where Escapees is located and pulled up the contract for Plan 1735, a BlueSelect Bronze HSA plan.  On page 5 is the info on Exclusive Provider Services.

I think I found the contract you're referring to.  Clicking here will download it:

https://www.floridablue.com/plancontracts/individual/file/ODM0MjQ3NTp3d3dzYmM%3D

It is 139 pages.

Note that this is the 2017 version.  I can't find the 2018 version.  I used this link:

https://www.floridablue.com/plancontracts/individual/

Do you have a better one, because I'd really like to see the contract I'll actually have.

And I see the info on page 5 of the Schedule of Benefits about Exclusive Provider Services you mentioned.  Here's what it says, after a chart of in-network and out-of-network benefits for various services :

Quote

The Services listed in the chart above are all subject to the Exclusive Provider Provision explained in your Contract. If you use a Provider other than the designated Exclusive Provider for these Services you will be responsible for the full charge, except in certain situations, which are explained in your Contract.

To be honest, if I didn't have my radar up for "exclusive provider services" being something special and unexpected, I would probably have looked at that part as just the usual information on what's covered, and I don't think most people would be any different.  And the only people who would even be exposed to this are the ones who downloaded the 139-page contract (I had to do serious digging to find it) and actually started reading it.

You don't get any of that from the plan summaries and other information that is all that the vast majority of people will see.

 

On 10/27/2017 at 9:19 AM, saydiver said:

The average person should probably talk to a FL insurance broker, before signing up for FL Blue insurance.

But the average person would have to know he needs to talk to a Florida insurance broker, and how would he know that?  The readily available information out there sure wouldn't tip him off. 

And as for brokers, I'm a fulltimer and need "special" RV insurance, and I know there is only a small subset of brokers and companies that handle it.  (I didn't know that when I started fulltiming almost 15 years ago--how would I?  So a hat tip to people who discuss it on forums like this.)

The problem is that I've been told patently false things by brokers who are fulltime RV insurance specialists, including the highly touted Miller Insurance.

And that's just with fairly uniform RV insurance, where (1) brokers should have 100% accurate information on it but that's not necessarily the case, and (2) it's easier for me to realize something sounds off. 

But there are a million ways health insurance policies can differ, from obvious things like deductibles and copays, to things you'd never dream of, like under the BlueSelect plan, your doctor visit is covered when you're out of your local area, but your crutches aren't.  So it's harder (1) for a broker to know every single provision, and (2) for me to even know what situations I need to ask about. 

And remember, what we're most concerned about is an extremely rare situation for their usual client--routine health care while not in the service area.  I wouldn't expect brokers to be well versed in that, just like when I call the IRS, I don't expect the person I get on the phone to understand the oil depletion allowance.  And probably most accountants wouldn't know anything about it, either.

 

On 10/27/2017 at 12:18 AM, Zulu said:

If you're not a health insurance broker, then you do the research.

Pretty much the same strategy for any area you're unfamiliar with.

Easy to say, but it's a tall order to expect someone to find, let alone read, a 139-page insurance contract.  And understand the 139-page contract?  Yeah, right.  That is simply beyond a lot of people's abilities. 

First they'd have to know that what's on the websites isn't the whole story.  Then they'd have to find the contract.  Good luck with that (and even I'm using the 2017 version, so my research is faulty from the get-go).  Then it would take them hours just to read it, and no matter how much time they spent, there are a lot of people who could never actually understand it just because they don't have sufficient critical reading skills, either because they're just genetically not smart enough to comprehend the language in the contract, or they haven't acquired advanced reading skills by going to college or similar.  Just because a person can understand the individual words, it doesn't mean they can understand what they mean when they're put in a certain order.

I look at the posts on forums like this and know that there are a lot of people who are borderline illiterate and yet are successful enough to have the money to engage in what can be a pretty expensive pastime.  There are a lot of people out there below that level.


And get this:  in looking at the contract, I ran across this provision:

Quote

Provider Financial Incentive Disclosure
Health care decisions are the shared responsibility of you, your family, and your health care Providers. A Provider's decisions regarding Health Care Services may have a financial impact on you and/or the Provider. For example a Provider in his or her contract with us may agree to accept financial responsibility for your Health Care Services. We encourage you to talk to your Providers about how, and to what extent, the acceptance of financial risk by the Provider may affect his or her Health Care Service decisions.

First of all, what are these situations where my doctor accepts financial risk for my health care services?  What does that even mean?  Maybe it's covered in another part of the contract--I'll have to look.

And even if I figure that out, in the 7 minutes I have to see my doctor, I'm supposed to also have a discussion about the financial provisions of his contract with Blue Cross, and how they might affect the actual care I get?

Or when I'm lying on a gurney going in for surgery, I'm not only supposed to verify that each person even tangentially related to the procedure will indeed be in network, including ones that may be called in after I'm unconscious, but I'm supposed to also be discussing how my treatment may be affected by financial incentives that any in-network people may receive?  Egad.

And I found this only because I'm having to read the dang contract. Most people get insurance from their employers, and don't have any choice in the nitty gritty and wouldn't have any reason to read the contract--they just take what they get.  (And they're fine with that, because they don't realize that they're probably forgoing in salary what their employer is paying for their health insurance.)

Those who have to buy on the individual market are well aware of the cost, but they have choices like HMOs or PPOs with a local network, and probably just see which plan would include their doctor and go with that. 

And then you get to us, the fulltimers, for whom an HMO or a PPO with only a local network isn't a decent option, and the reasons they're not a decent option are completely foreign to the vast majority of health insurance clients.  I don't think I'm entitled to feel terribly put upon, because I'm choosing this lifestyle.  But it does grind my gears that even for "normal" people, figuring out something that should be simple--how to access health care--is not only a labyrinth, it's one with trap doors.  And even if you do it right, there's always the specter of balance billing when an out-of-network provider is called in without your being told in advance, and you just hope your surgeon isn't one of the ones who does it on purpose, and splits the higher fee with the out-of-network doctor. 

 

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Yes, that's the contract for plan 1735 for 2017 and the correct link.  I doubt the 2018 version is any different. I was unsuccessful in posting the contract, but I did post the link in my second post to this thread. I think FL Blue sends a letter each year explaining who the exclusive providers are for that year rather than putting the info in the actual contract.

 I get what you're saying.  Most people find out about exclusive providers when their claim is denied, unless they have a knowledgeable broker or have read the info on a forum like this beforehand. Believe me I'm thankful I have 28+ years of health insurance experience to understand the language, although I've been out of the business 16+ yrs. Like I mentioned BlueSelect is not available in my county.  I discovered the particulars of Blue Select plans when I was researching why someone's claim was denied when she had lab work done someplace other than Quest Diagnostics while out of state.   That's why I created a post last year about the differences between Blue Select and Blue Options plans.  

Do a Google search on "Provider Financial Incentive Disclosure" and you'll find your answer as to why it's in the contract.

While scanning the contract did you also read the section about the Blue Card program? FL has a large percentage of its population who are sun birds/snow birds, so a PPO policy with nationwide coverage is just as important to that segment of the population as it is to fulltimers.

You've seen my rant/opinion about FL Blue.  Not much I can add to that, except to say what few claims I've had, both instate and out of state, were handled timely. That's the only positive thing I can say about them.  

 

 

 

 

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Mine in CA for a Bronze level Kaiser plan increased 86% from 2017 premiums to 2018 premiums.  We started out 5 years ago with an affordable premium for our circumstances.  We're only needed to use the insurance once in 5 years and the total premium increase from the first years rate to next years rate is 278%.  How is that affordable?  I wish I could increase the prices I charge my customers by that amount.  But I cant, well, I could but they would go elsewhere.  Wish I could go elsewhere for health insurance.  Before the ACA, we had NONE.  So I am grateful for that opportunity but it would be helpful is the costs could be more reasonable.  Not close to retirement, self employed and wish I could see that idea of combining small businesses into a pool to attract more affordable insurance like big companies are able to do.

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44 minutes ago, saydiver said:

Yes, that's the contract for plan 1735 for 2017 and the correct link.  I doubt the 2018 version is any different.

I also doubt that it's different, but if it is different, in some people's eyes you have no right to complain because you failed to research it properly. 

 

Quote

I discovered the particulars of Blue Select plans when I was researching why someone's claim was denied when she had lab work done someplace other than Quest Diagnostics while out of state.   That's why I created a post last year about the differences between Blue Select and Blue Options plans.  

I'm afraid that's when most people discover the particulars of their plan--when a claim is denied.  Not a great way to run things.

 

Quote

Do a Google search on "Provider Financial Incentive Disclosure" and you'll find your answer as to why it's in the contract.

Well, it explains why it's in the contract--so they can say, "Hey, we disclosed that your doctor might make money if he doesn't order tests for you." 

I personally think there are waaaay too many tests ordered, and suspect it has to do with doctors either trying to CYA or they have an ownership interest in the company that performs the test, but making the patient (1) find this disclosure in the 139-page contract and (2) do research to see what possible tests there could be for his condition (which doctors hate) and (3) ask the doctor why those tests aren't being ordered and whether it's because he makes money if he doesn't order them.  That's a great way to make to endear yourself to the person who holds your well-being in his hands.

 Again, not a great way to run things.

 

Quote

While scanning the contract did you also read the section about the Blue Card program? FL has a large percentage of its population who are sun birds/snow birds, so a PPO policy with nationwide coverage is just as important to that segment of the population as it is to fulltimers.

Yes I did, and it was very helpful. 

I was wondering why Florida in particular has options that aren't available in other states, and that makes sense. 

Thank you again for sharing your experience.  It's very very helpful.

 

Quote

You've seen my rant/opinion about FL Blue.  Not much I can add to that, except to say what few claims I've had, both instate and out of state, were handled timely. That's the only positive thing I can say about them.  

I'll add one:  At least they offer the prospect of having something out-of-state paid at all, between having a nationwide network and providing some out-of-network coverage.  Again, it doesn't matter to the vast majority of people because the only time they'd ever seek health care when not at home is in the case of an emergency, and emergencies are covered.

But are they?  What constitutes an emergency, and when do they declare the emergency over?  That could happen even to people who live in one place and have some sort of attack when on vacation.  But I think it's just something that nobody expects to happen. so they don't even think about it.  But in that situation, not having any out-of-network coverage makes me nervous.

 

3 minutes ago, rpsinc said:

Not close to retirement, self employed and wish I could see that idea of combining small businesses into a pool to attract more affordable insurance like big companies are able to do.

Why should a self-employed person have access to a pool, while an unemployed person doesn't?  Just put everybody in the pool, period.  It's all so ridiculous.

 

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Why should a self-employed person have access to a pool, while an unemployed person doesn't?  Just put everybody in the pool, period.  It's all so ridiculous.

 

I dont know anything about being unemployed, as I have never been.  I was simply talking from the point that I have experience with.  Putting everybody into a pool is similar to socialized medical, like Canada has or the VA, and that has drawbacks too.  No plan will work for everyone but its good to see that government is at least trying.

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Here's a caveat for people trying to find a Florida Blue contract and getting only one from 2017:  I think it's best to ignore the numbers in the Schedule of Benefits at the beginning of the contract.

I'm looking at Plan 1443, and there are some differences.

For example, on Florida Blue's website, in the "Health Plan Details" on this policy, the deductible is $6,050 and the out-of-pocket max is $7,350, but in the (2017) contract, the deductible is $6,500 and the out-of-pocket max is $7,150, but

On the website, under "physician office services," primary care physician is:

Quote

Copay: $100 Copay after deductible

In-Network Only: $0 Copayment may apply for the first 3 visits.

In the contract, it's:

Quote

visits 1 - 2 $0 Copay**

thereafter $55 Copay

The ** says "Each Covered Person each Calendar Year is eligible for two (2) visits at no Cost Share for office visits rendered by Blue Physician Recognition (Florida only) or Primary Care Physicians..."  Maybe that's changed to three visits in 2018, and the 2018 contract will clarify the "may"? 

For specialists, the website says "$150 copay after deductible" and the contract says "$85 copay after deductible."

For urgent care, the website says "$175 Copay after deductible" and the contract says "$275 copay after deductible."

And for inpatient hospital services, the website says the coinsurance is 50%, while the contract says it's 40%.

Note that in some cases the 2018 website is higher, and in some cases the 2017 contract is higher, so you can't even assume a direction for the differences.

Maybe the "how it works" part of the contract is the same.  I assumed it would be, but now I'm not so sure.  If it were on paper, I'd put one on top of the other and put them on a window to compare them, but I don't want to print 130 pages, and oh, I don't have access to a 2018 contract anyway, so that's a non-starter.

Anyway, if you want to know plan details, look at the contract, but at the very least be sure to substitute 2018 deductibles and copays, etc, for the ones in the 2017 contract's schedule of benefits, and perhaps if some provision is very very important to you, verify with Florida Blue that it's the way you want it to be for 2018.

 

 

 

Edited by Blues

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21 minutes ago, Blues said:

Here's a caveat for people trying to find a Florida Blue contract and getting only one from 2017:  I think it's best to ignore the numbers in the Schedule of Benefits at the beginning of the contract.

 

The "How it Works" part is likely the same, not the numbers. Why don't you call FL Blue on Monday and see if they will send you a 2018 contract. 

 

 

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You can easily check South Dakota's insurance rates on healthcare.gov.  But I'm curious why you want to know what they are, since their offerings don't fit the needs of fulltime RVers.  Or has something changed?

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On 10/28/2017 at 1:05 PM, saydiver said:

FL has a large percentage of its population who are sun birds/snow birds, so a PPO policy with nationwide coverage is just as important to that segment of the population as it is to fulltimers.

I was thinking about this.  Aren't most snowbirds on Medicare, so they wouldn't be looking for these types of policies?

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1 hour ago, Blues said:

I was thinking about this.  Aren't most snowbirds on Medicare, so they wouldn't be looking for these types of policies?

Not everyone here is Medicare age.  Lots of early retirees or people who own their own business and have multiple homes.

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I was told this morning by one of FL Blue's escalation team members, that the 2018 plan contracts will not be online until after open enrollment ends. So apparently FL Blue expects their customers to choose a plan just by looking at the Summary of Benefits and Coverage, which does not cover everything you need to know about the plan.

Edited by saydiver

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On 11/9/2017 at 10:45 AM, saydiver said:

I was told this morning by one of FL Blue's escalation team members, that the 2018 plan contracts will not be online until after open enrollment ends. So apparently FL Blue expects their customers to choose a plan just by looking at the Summary of Benefits and Coverage, which does not cover everything you need to know about the plan.

Received an email from the escalation team member that the FL Blue 2018 plan contracts are online.  See:

https://www.floridablue.com/plancontracts/individual

 

Looks like my threatening to file another complaint with the FL Insurance Dept helped to get this company to do the right thing and get these contracts online before open enrollment ends. :) 

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