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Best way to summerize


KodiakJack

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I have read many comments on how best to winterize an RV (even provided some myself) but what is the best way to prepare a rig for stay through the better part of a Yuma summer. I plan to; install radiant Reflectix barrier on the inside surface of the windows, shutdown the frig and prop it open, top off the water in the batteries, oil down all the woodwork/cabinets, place insulated cushions in the vent fans opening, and bring in the slides, but there must be more to do. I will have 50 Amp power available.

Should I….

… leave the Magnum to tend the batteries?

… shut all the electrical down, AC and DC?

… place bucket(s) of water to help keep the rig from getting too dry?

… cover the AC units?

 

Anyway summarizing is out of my element so though I’d ask folk what works for them.

 

Later,

J

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Use a small battery minder and disconnect the negative battery post.

 

Add a bit of veggie oil to each sink / drain trap or cover it with saran wrap to keep the traps from evaporating dry.

 

Put a big trash can in the rig, line it with a disposable bag and fill that with water, the moisture will help prevent wood from cracking. DO NOT skip the liner, the residue from the water will make a mess out of your can and is really hard to clean out.

 

Look around and stuff steel wool into any likely holes to avoid insect or rodent visitors.

 

Remove any food items that aren't sealed, again to not attract visitors.

 

Cover the tires to keep them out of direct sun, we used a cheap sheet of plywood so wind wouldn't be an issue. We lost vinyl covers when the wind whipped them and ripped the straps off.

 

Do a really good flush of your holding tanks, stuff left baking all summer is going to get really hard.

 

Add a bit of bleach to your fresh tank and run it through the plumbing to make suer nothing will be growing in there.

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I did the water lines the same as for winter. The RV antifreeze will not evaporate like water does.

The batteries are a big issue. We just disconnected them, and they almost blew up and had to be replaced. Do what Stan says.

The refrig can go either way. Always on with doors closed, or never on with doors open.

Antifreeze in the toilet bowl to keep it lubricated.

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My wife and I help some friends summarize and open them back up in the fall here in the park in Yuma. Prior postings about windows are good. Turn off propane, all power AC and DC. Top off batteries with water. Use 5 gallon plastic water buckets with a big hole in the lid, about 4 are usually good enough. Don’t use plastic milk jugs or the like as the bottoms get funky and will leak. Use veggie oil and some water in the pottie and cover bowl with Saran Wrap. Dump gray water tanks and close. Dump black tank and flush. Then close and put some water in the tank for the summer. Remove water heater drain plug or anode rod and let out until you flush it next fall. Put RV antifreeze down drain traps, it doesn’t evaporate like water. Get some of those cheap plastic sheets at the Dollar Store and put over bed and upholstered furniture. Some other things that can be done: put aluminum tape on the inside of the outside refer compartment door, same tape over furnace exhaust, same tape over the water heater grill, same tape over the city water hook-up if outside or a plug. Bees have seemed to have made some inroads here in the Yuma area the last several summers. You can build boxes for the roof vents, refer vent, AC unit. If you do this, make sure to lay a patio block on each. If you have plastic covers over the roof vents, boxes won’t be needed. The bare vent lids can get brittle over the summer, deteriorate and let rain in. We have never done the oiling of cabinets etc. as it never has been a problem. I believe you really be surprised how well it survives and how little dust will get in.

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Thanks for all the great ideas. Several hadn't come to mind so I appreciate you taking the time to comment. I plan to incorporate them all in one form or another. Only thing I am still thinking on is our (new last fall) 6 volt batteries as I don't want to screw them up. Trickle charge or not to trickle charge that is the question.

 

Later,

J

 

PS Right on on the bees. There was a recent event north of here where lots of folks got stung by a swarm of killer bees so I will be sure to fill any gaps I find. A couple days ago a neighbor took a weed burner to a bees nest and it kicked out lots about 20 of which got into the rig next to ours (owner's didn't know how) that had to be hunted down.

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Since you have power available a battery minder might be a better option than a trickle charger, the smarts in the minder will keep the batteries as happy as possible with minimal water use.

 

You could use the solar by fiddling your voltages to keep the batteries full while minimizing water use but I really lean to the minder.

 

 

Bees can be a huge mess, not only the dead bees but the wax and honey they leave behind after they are gone can lead to nasty problems. Give the roof a double check for gaps around the plumbing penetrations and don't forget the fridge compartment, that is all too attractive to a swarm of bees, the roof or side vents are often not well screened. Down below check both battery and propane compartments to make sure openings are screened.

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Kodiak Jack, is there going to be someone nearby to watch your unit or have a key to it during the off-season? Also since you are in the Yuma area, do have the Rural Metro policy? Several years ago, in a nearby park, the folks left their 12 volt hooked up. Gradually as several people started coming back an alarm started going off in the unit. Someone called Rural Metro, they responded, the owner didn't have the Rural Metro policy so he got a nice monetary "welcome back, Snowbird". There is no way I'd would have power running to my unit when it is going to be unattended for the summer especially if there is no one to look after it.

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Kodiak Jack, is there going to be someone nearby to watch your unit or have a key to it during the off-season? Also since you are in the Yuma area, do have the Rural Metro policy? Several years ago, in a nearby park, the folks left their 12 volt hooked up. Gradually as several people started coming back an alarm started going off in the unit. Someone called Rural Metro, they responded, the owner didn't have the Rural Metro policy so he got a nice monetary "welcome back, Snowbird". There is no way I'd would have power running to my unit when it is going to be unattended for the summer especially if there is no one to look after it.

At "...a minimum rate of $1,500.00 per hour per fire fighting vehicle plus $150.00 per hour per fire fighter ($1,500.00 minimum response charge)..." I bet they had a heck of a "welcome back, Snowbird" surprise. I think I will take my chances with the batteries and top off the water and just disconnect them. No one will be watching just the alarm company and me, that is, if I can keep the internet on I'll install a remote camera.

 

Thanks again all for your comments.

 

Later,

J

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