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Outside Mirror Probem


Joan&Ron

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recently, one of my outside mirrors became loose to a point of nearly falling off from its former mount.

When I tried to re-tighten the screws I found that that threads were no longer useable. Upon further examination I discovered that originally the mirror was secured with long wood screws, through The fiberglass exterior, and a layer of foam into wood backing. I was very surprised that the mirror was secured to wood. I expected to find sheetmetal screws into a metal plate of some kind.

The original threads and holes into the wood are enlarged to the point where they can no longer be used.

I did try to repair the holes using wood epoxy so that I may be able to make new threads into the epoxy. This idea did not work.

I am interested if anyone had encountered a similar problem and found a solution that did not involve a major repair with the removal of inside dashboard or panel removal in order to install some kind of metal plate.

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Not being to really see just what you are faced with but trying to visualize the setup, it seems like you might have a situation that something like a threaded rivet may be something you could use. I used them in quite a few applications when I had a boat dealership and faced some difficult installations of accessories in fairly difficult places.

 

You might want to google something like "threaded rivets" on Amazon.com to see what I am talking about. There are different sizes for different bolts, threads, thickness of the material, etc. so you have to just take a look and see if your situation would lend itself to using this type of product. I found them to be quite useful when I needed to put a bolt into a blind place without an easy way to get to the back side for a nut. If you do see where something like this would work, I would suggest you might want to put a drop of LocTite (or similar) on it to prevent the bolt from backing out.

 

Good Luck and let us know how it turns out.

 

Capt Joe

Capt Joe

2004 Winnebago Brave 32v on WH20 Chassis w/8.1L and Allison

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If you can get to the back side get some tee nuts from home depot or lowes. Then you can use bolts.

2011 Berkshire 390-rb-40, upgraded tires and front axle airbags, 2012 Jeep Wrangler 2 door, Blue Ox baseplate and BlueOx aladdin tow bar, Blue Ox Patriot brake system, wiring run through right frame rail and homemade led taillight bar.

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One option to do is to install a threaded brass incert into the wood. It will have machine threads on the inside and coarse threads on the outside. Drill the correct sise hole and tap threads into the wood, then epoxy the incert in place. Let it cure before installing the mirror. You will need the appropriate screws to attach the mirror.

Anther option is to drill a hole for the brass incert to fit through and then fill with fiberglass. Let the glass cure then drill and tap threads for the incert to thread in. Rough the outside of the incert thread a little and put a small amount of liguid for the fiberglass on the outer thread and install it. Make sure you added the hardner to the liquid part of the fiberglass when used.

The brass incert said that I mention are available at hardware store for repairing striped threads in wood.

I have done this several times to repair where awnings have blown in the wind and stripped the holes out from the wall. And reinstall a mirror or two that way also.

 

 

Be safe, Vern

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One option to do is to install a threaded brass incert into the wood. It will have machine threads on the inside and coarse threads on the outside. Drill the correct sise hole and tap threads into the wood, then epoxy the incert in place. Let it cure before installing the mirror. You will need the appropriate screws to attach the mirror.

Anther option is to drill a hole for the brass incert to fit through and then fill with fiberglass. Let the glass cure then drill and tap threads for the incert to thread in. Rough the outside of the incert thread a little and put a small amount of liguid for the fiberglass on the outer thread and install it. Make sure you added the hardner to the liquid part of the fiberglass when used.

The brass incert said that I mention are available at hardware store for repairing striped threads in wood.

I have done this several times to repair where awnings have blown in the wind and stripped the holes out from the wall. And reinstall a mirror or two that way also.

 

 

Be safe, Vern

Thank you for your suggestion Vern!

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Not being to really see just what you are faced with but trying to visualize the setup, it seems like you might have a situation that something like a threaded rivet may be something you could use. I used them in quite a few applications when I had a boat dealership and faced some difficult installations of accessories in fairly difficult places.

 

You might want to google something like "threaded rivets" on Amazon.com to see what I am talking about. There are different sizes for different bolts, threads, thickness of the material, etc. so you have to just take a look and see if your situation would lend itself to using this type of product. I found them to be quite useful when I needed to put a bolt into a blind place without an easy way to get to the back side for a nut. If you do see where something like this would work, I would suggest you might want to put a drop of LocTite (or similar) on it to prevent the bolt from backing out.

 

Good Luck and let us know how it turns out.

 

Capt Joe

Thank you Capt. Joe,

This may work for 3 of the four holes. The fourth hole, now badly enlarged, overlaps a wiring harness access hole. I would have to do something different here. If there was a way of attaching a photo to this, you would see my dilemna.

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What I suggested can be done from the outside.

The holes that are drilled into the body to do the repair should be located so they do not show when the mirror is installed.

As for the wiring harness it needs to be worked around it.

 

Just by chance where are you located.

 

Also pictures would help greatly. Or could you text them to me.

 

 

Be Safe, Vern

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One option to do is to install a threaded brass incert into the wood. It will have machine threads on the inside and coarse threads on the outside. Drill the correct sise hole and tap threads into the wood, then epoxy the incert in place. Let it cure before installing the mirror. You will need the appropriate screws to attach the mirror.

Anther option is to drill a hole for the brass incert to fit through and then fill with fiberglass. Let the glass cure then drill and tap threads for the incert to thread in. Rough the outside of the incert thread a little and put a small amount of liguid for the fiberglass on the outer thread and install it. Make sure you added the hardner to the liquid part of the fiberglass when used.

The brass incert said that I mention are available at hardware store for repairing striped threads in wood.

I have done this several times to repair where awnings have blown in the wind and stripped the holes out from the wall. And reinstall a mirror or two that way also.

 

 

Be safe, Vern

 

925-T.jpg?1436267182

I agree, here is the procedure: http://www.gardenguides.com/135507-install-brass-thread-inserts.html

 

2000 Winnebago Ultimate Freedom USQ40JD, ISC 8.3 Cummins 350, Spartan MM Chassis. USA IN 1SG retired;Good Sam Life member,FMCA ." And so, my fellow Americans: ask not what your country can do for you--ask what you can do for your country.  John F. Kennedy 20 Jan 1961

 

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