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I'm not sure this is the appropriate category to post this in, but...I've got this old 2003

coachman chaparral, admittedly not a premo unit, but I'm poorish and it's what I could

afford. I've pretty much gone through it, upgraded converter, new frig, new water heater

added fresh water tank, filter system, replaced a lot of plumbing stuff and rebuilt

commode, wired for sat tv, painted it...and there's the rub. With fresh paint it's obvious

there's some delamination in the bedroom area. My inclination is to ignore it because I'm

just kinda' tired of working on it, I'm not good at body work and I really can't afford

to pay at this time. I'm looking for someone to reassure me that it'll be OK for awhile.

Is there anyone out there that would say that? Honestly-ish.

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Sorry, I wouldn't say that...

 

However if you find the cause of the delamination, likely a leak, and fix it then things should stabilize and you can ignore it for a while.

 

Once you go to fix it you really need to determine just what the issue is. If it is just the fiberglass coming free of the plywood you can likely fix it with some glue and big clamps. Think 2x4 lumber and ropes for the clamps so you can put pressure on the fiberglass you just glued down until the glue sets. However if there is bad news and the underlying plywood has also delaminated the repair job is a lot harder, some folks don't try to do a repair of this type of damage on an older rig and just add lots of glue to stabilize the area.

 

Just find the reason it started and fix it for now.

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Oh thank you Stan...I have sealed things up. when I bought it it had a deep gouge along the side, before, through

and after the slide. I spent months repairing on that darn thing and have gotten it functional, if not too pretty

up close. I did tons of stuff eliminating possible leaks. I was concerned the delamination might effect the strength

of the unit, but, common sense tells me it probably will only be a big factor in big wind. I'm hoping that's the

case 'till I can rathole more money

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If there are no more leaks then you will probably be OK for at least a while. Repairing delamination problems is difficult at best and may or may not be all that successful, at least as far as my observations go. I have not personally done any of that sort of work, so all that I know about it is just hearsay. What I can tell you is that there are many RVs out on the road with at least some delamination issues and some of them seem to continue that way for quite some time with very little change in the amount as long as there are no leaks. Leaks can destroy an RV.

 

A major part of the issue is just how bad the lamination problems are. If it is a few small areas, I don't think that I'd be too concerned but just watch them. If they start to get worse, then you may have no choice but to attempt a repair.

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Main wall, near the bedroom windows on each side. The drivers side is worse...about 10 sq feet. I've been mulling

it over and it seems if I made a rig out of a coupla' long 2x4s, held together with a strap at the top, drapped

across the roof, I could drill a smallish hole in the fiberglass, shoot in some glue [don't know what kind and

fashion a pad to pressurize the delaminated area by attaching a ratcheting strap to the bottom of the 2x4's and

stabilize that area. Does that sound reasonable? Then I'd just have to waterproof my little holes and a dad

of paint...do you think I'm thinking right?

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Main wall, near the bedroom windows on each side. The drivers side is worse...about 10 sq feet. I've been mulling

it over and it seems if I made a rig out of a coupla' long 2x4s, held together with a strap at the top, drapped

across the roof, I could drill a smallish hole in the fiberglass, shoot in some glue [don't know what kind and

fashion a pad to pressurize the delaminated area by attaching a ratcheting strap to the bottom of the 2x4's and

stabilize that area. Does that sound reasonable? Then I'd just have to waterproof my little holes and a dad

of paint...do you think I'm thinking right?

 

That is pretty close to what we have seen.

 

When gluing make sure to use a pressure roller to get the glue to every spot that is even thinking of coming free. If you have an existing screw hole in the area or border on a window or door frame inject the glue from there.

 

For a pad a piece of 3/4 ply, 2" soft foam and another piece of 3/4 ply makes a good pressure pad. Use plenty of 2x4s, don't crank really hard on just one or two or you'll snap them or get uneven pressure.

 

If the plywood is deteriorating you'll need more pressure, longer.

 

Taking the pad off a day late hurts nothing, 10 minutes too soon is a disaster, keep that in mind as your fingers itch to see how it looks under there!

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www.irv2.com/forums/f87/delaminated-skin-114498.html

 

www.irv2.com/forums/f44/filon-or-gel-coat-fiberglass-30160.html

 

I wasn't going to involve myself with this any more, clearly you didn't like what you were told, that is part of the reason I deleted the post.

This is not an easy fix.

 

The only way to get Sikaflex even close to being thin is to wrap it in a heat blanket or put it in hot water. If you put it in a micro wave for too long, it will blow up. I've seen Eastern European painters try this with caulking in Calgary, you chuck the micro.

 

PL premium is very thick, PL 8000 is much thinner.

 

ALL of the suggestions sent to you are covered in the first topic.

 

Find the cause of delamination, it may not be water. The cause may be a poor glue job.

Find and stop the leak(s), if there are any.

Remove inside wall paneling

Remove foam, it is a closed cell foam. This could be salvaged but I wouldn't put new glue over old. It has already let go once, why risk it again?

Remove Luan paneling glued to skin

Dry everything

Parking next to a wall with braces b/w wall and trailer.

If you cut the plywood out for the window, the window need not be removed. Unless there is another reason to do so.

 

All 3 people and firms I contacted are experts in this and related areas.

 

Another glue firm is West Epoxy Systems.

 

I know you were not thrilled by the info provided the other day. That was obvious.

 

Read through the topic a couple of times. I believe the 4 of us are on the mark.

Not including me there is over 70 yrs experience with the other 3. This isn't their first rodeo.

Good luck with whatever method/process you try or use.

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More than likely the window is the source of your leak. If the delam is in that area you may be able to clamp the wall by removing he window. An alternative is to park your unit next to a wall ( garage, house) and apply pressure from the house to the sidewall by using a very small hydraulic jack and 2x4's. You will need some hitech glue. Try a body shop supply house. If the interior of the wall is rotten or wet no glue will hold.

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If the problem extends up to or very near to the window, I would definitely remove the window first. The only way to be sure that a window does not leak is to remove it and replace the butyl caulk that is used around the edges with new and then tighten until a little bit squeezes out all around. Only with the window out will you be able to make sure that there is no water entry point because it is quite possible that the water which caused the leak got into the wall but not inside of the RV so it didn't show. With the window out you will not only be able to check for signs of leakage but if the problem reaches the opening it will be far less difficult to get the glue into the opening.

 

Some manufacturers put a sealant covering the edges of the wall around each window opening to help prevent water intrusion, while others just put the window into the raw opening. I have seen them both ways and while I prefer the sealed edges, it is probably easier to tell if there is a problem at the window with the raw edges. While I have little practical experience with repairing lamination problems, I have repaired several window leak issues both on my own RV and also helping others. Entry doors can also have that same problem and if leaking the fix is the same but most likely then it will show up as a soft floor. Removing a window requires two people but it is not a difficult job and neither is the reinstalling of one.

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Take the trim off so you can access the bad wood under the loose area. That is if the edge of the panel is loose. everyone that I have done has been different. Be careful as to not crack the outside panel surface. Once you get the panel loose them prop it so you can do the work underneath.

I have removed the drivers side window on a Monaco coach, all the trim around the fiberglass panel, slowly worked the panel loose form th wall , repair the wood where needed and glued it back in place without cracking the paint.

If the material underneath is respectable then apply a good water base glue. Do the best you can to get the glue where you need it and the proper amount. Then clamp with 2 by what ever and let set for two or more days.

If you drill holes in the fiberglass and insert glue it may not have any solid surface to adhere to, Or may not squeeze out like it should be.

If you drill holes in the fiberglass then when the panel is tight then repair the drilled holes with bell coat

Most of this work is not hard, just that it needs patience and some thinking on what to do.

 

 

Safe Travels, Vern

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