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How does your AUX fuel tank connect to your truck?


jsymmes

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This is how I installed my new AUX fuel tank:

I recently ordered an AUX46 fuel tank / gravity fill connection from a www.atitank.com distributor. The tank was installed in the bed of our truck right behind the cab underneath a tonneau cover. The gravity fuel connection was spliced into the rubber filler hose between the fuel inlet on the side of the truck and the factory tank.

After the install, the factory tank was filled to approx. 95% and then the AUX tank was partially filled in order to check for leaks. When I finished placing fuel in the AUX tank I listened at the factory fill inlet to make sure the fuel was flowing into the factory fuel tank. I was able to hear a gurgling sound to confirm the flow. Next I looked at the “Tee” connection that I had spliced into the rubber fill and all was nice and dry.

Next I drove home and parked the truck. After about four hours I inspected the “Tee” connection once again and it still was not leaking. Then I took off the factory fuel fill cap and found the fuel had risen to the very top, right behind the fuel cap. During the short time that I had the cap off, I noticed the fuel was continuing to rise. This concerned me that the gravity fill float valve was leaking (it was located below the factory fuel inlet) and once the liquid was up against the back side of the fuel cap the fuel would leak through the venting of the cap. I immediately shut off the fuel from the AUX tank to the factory tank and called the gravity fill valve manufacturer with my concerns.

What I learned was the factory fuel cap does have venting capability but it is the secondary device for both allowing air to enter the tank or to relive pressure in an emergency situation. When I called “STANT” who has made fuel/radiator caps for years. I was told the cap will vent after the internal pressure is greater than 2 P.S.I.. That will happen only in an emergency because the normal venting of the factory tank is in another location and that location has insignificant restriction.

So the lesson learned is not to worry if the fuel rises up to the factory filler cap because that is normal. As long as the factory fuel gauge on the dash shows full always fill at the Aux tank. The ball-check in the gravity feed point is not to stop the flow of fuel to the factory tank, it’s purpose is to prevent spillage from the factory tank if the truck happens to turn over. OOOPS !!!

How many people are using this same connection and have been happy with the operation?

_FUEL_SHOTZ_LOGO.jpgDiesel Auxiliary Installation Kit Only
The FUEL SHOTZ auxiliary fuel tank installation kit is used to connect the auxiliary fuel tank to the factory fuel tank via the factory fill tube. The kit contains everything you need to make the connection from the auxiliary tank with a 3/8” NPT bottom fitting to the factory fill tube. These kits are supplied with detailed instructions and take less than an hour to install.

  • No wires or switches to install
  • Rollover protection
  • Requires a 3/8” npt bottom fitting on auxiliary tank
  • Quick easy installation
FUEL_SHOTZ_Diesel_Auxiliary_Install_Kit.
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That is the same kit I used on my 2005 GMC. I never noticed the fuel rising to the top of the fill cap though. I did have a problem with the computer on the truck getting confused about fuel mileage and the fuel guage would act up so what I did was install a small ball valve on the gravity tube running from the aux tank. I kept it closed and used it to fill the main tank while stopped. I did come to find that if I opened this ball valve after the fuel in the main tank started to drop, the computer on the truck did not get get as confused.

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I use a 3/4" Hose with a Ball valve at the aux tank and a 3/4" ball valve proir to leaving the bed. there is a third ball valve post filter prior to teeing into the main fuel tank vent system. I extended all the vents to rise above the Aux tank fuel level to be sure none would syphon off. Both tanks are connected and all valves open 24/7 365/6.

 

I shut the aux outlet when I initially fill the aux tank because I use my own lubricity additive and want it to mix prior to flowing into the partially empty main tank. I only fill the Aux tank & let gravity care for the main tank. I fill twice if I'm in a hurry, otherwise I just take my time, cleaning windows, checking fluids, belts, etc. like in the full service era of yester year.

 

The only leak ever was a loose filter bowl. (6 years)

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Mine is an electric valve that switches between the two tanks with a switch on the dash. The one thing I do not have is a fuel gauge for the aux tank that I can see from the dash.

 

I can run off of either tank totally independent of the other.

 

(It is a 91 gallon tank in the rear of the pickup bed with just a shallow toolbox area on top. Works for me.)

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Not intending to hijack the thread, but I'm really curious. Why would one want to have an auxiliary tank in the bed of the truck?

 

If diesel weighs roughly 7.15 pounds per gallon and I install a 50 gallon auxiliary tank, then I could be carrying an extra 357 pounds in the bed of the truck. Plus, that doesn't include the weight of the tank itself. Seems counter-productive to me.

 

Russ

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The goal is to not have to stop for fuel so often or to be able to purchase lots of cheap fuel when you find it.

 

An in-bed tank is an alternative to an under bed tank, either an additional one or a larger replacement for the original. You have to decide which if either fits your needs.

 

The weight issues are a concern, particularly for trucks that are already heavy on the front axle since the tank goes ahead of the rear axle.

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It is really nice to have the choice to drive on past fuel stations in states that have particularly high fuel prices or where you really need to get on down the road.

 

Yes, fuel is heavy, and that gets taken into consideration. The tank itself, empty, I believe weighs something around 50 or 60#. And I do have use for the tool box on top of it.

 

One thing I didn't mention is that even though I have an extra 91 gallons of capacity, I rarely fill the tank completely. Much of the time, it sits either empty or nearly empty. When I use it, it is often with a certain trip in mind and a specific amount of fuel put in with the intent of not having a lot left over. Sometimes, on longer trips, that does mean starting with a full tank. The point is, I have the option. And honestly, wouldn't the option to travel, loaded, over 1000 miles and not have to worry about fuel be nice? For me, it's something I appreciate. Maybe some don't care.

 

Just my take.

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I carry 70 gallons in the auxiliary tank in our truck bed and use a 12v pump to move it into the main tank as needed. It also has an additional fuel filter and water separator. The prime reason for the extra tank is I don't want to have to navigate with the fifth wheel in fuel stations that are tight quarters of full of other vehicles as we often travel on secondary roads. We will unhook every 2 or 3 days and fuel up without the trailer. Greg

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Ok, I see now. I guess this would be primarily for usage when going some distance where not stopping often for fuel makes it worth it.

 

While I see the application, I doubt it would be a need for me as I intend to only move relatively short distances during a relocation. Say 100-150 miles maybe. Not to say that I won't EVER do a longer distance jaunt, but it would be rare.

 

Thanks all for the info, and thanks to GMom & GDad for letting me take their thread on a slight detour.

 

Russ

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When we had a fifth wheel and only a 35-gallon tank in the Dodge 1-t dually I got really tired of stopping every 2 hours for fuel. Which meant that the kids bought something in the "convenience" store, the wife got more snacks, everyone went potty, and it took 30 minutes. Plus I had to pay whatever the going rate was. Since we were farmers back then, I just put one of the diesel tanks we used to refuel tractors into the bed of the truck. I may not have looked too cool pumping the diesel into the pickup and I still had to stop every few hours but I could at least stop where the kids and the wife couldn't spend more money. :P

 

 

WDR

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I just filled my aux 100 gal tank and can now run from Austin, Tx to Phoenix, AZ without thinking about fuel. Also, with Gasbuddy the 2.59 price is the cheapest fuel from here to Phoenix. The aux tank is a hassle saver and $$ saver, well worth it's weight, I would not travel with out it.

 

Greg

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Thanks for all the informative comments. I am looking forward to having the flexibility in making my stops to visit the "Executive lounge" with the Aux fuel tank.

 

I really enjoyed hearing about the wife and children picking up a few items at each stop! I avoid those issues by locking the wife in the truck when stopping. If you believe that I have some swamp land in Florida for sale that has a nice water front view!

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