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We are replacing our travel trailer tires : dual axle , ST 225/75R 15 113M D1 .   Considering these ST tires.     Carlisle Radial Trail HD  and    Maxxis M8008 ST .  The specs appear to be equal , except Carlisle is Max speed 81MPH and can't find rating for Maxxis . Would consider Goodyear Endurance but it is not avaliable  in load D1  ( avaliable in E ,)

Cost at local Discount tire ; Maxxis  $131 / tire   and   Carlisle $106 / tire.

Any one have a preference or comment.

 

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I had the Maxxis M8008. They like most ST tires were speed rated at 65 MPH. They served me well for about 30,000 miles over 3 years. I replaced them due to age and sidewall damage to some from off road use.  I have had the Carlyle Radial Trail for two years and about 21,000 miles. As you stated they have a higher speed rating. Both seem to have enjoyed a pretty good reputation. I am not sure which is more available on the road as I have not had a need for an emergency replacement.

Upgrading from a Load Range D to a Load Range E is not necessarily a bad thing as long as the tire dimensions are the same. I have seen posts about checking the rims for the maximum rated pressure. I have looked at the rims on my current and previous trailer and they had no marking indicating maximum pressure. I asked some dealers that sold rims about this and they said that if the rim was not marked otherwise it should be able to handle tires that will fit it. I upgraded from Load Range C to Load Range D on my previous trailer and ran those tires at the higher pressure for 4 years prior to selling the trailer. You can also use the tire loading charts and run the Load Range E tires at an appropriate lower pressure than the maximum 80psi. 

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Thanks for responding. 

I have not considered changing to 16 in. 

I have considered upgrading same size tire to load E . which is 10 ply rated. However have seen articles that ST tires must be set at max cold psi. Therefore,  load D is 65 PSI and E is 80 psi . The I assume the E will  have stiffer sidewall , which may be good but also have rough ride ? ( at 80 PSI) for trailer compared to D. I don't know if this is  issue or not . 

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I have 2 trailers, not RVs, that came with 15" combo and I experienced periodic flat & blow outs.  Since the axles were 5200# and used 6 lug wheels, I upgraded to 16" and have not had any problems since, about 2+ years.  One trailer is a Carson Racer with construction equipment running at about 9K#(rated at 9999#) and the other is a Big Tex 10K deck over used for hauling heavy metal equipment.

Marcel

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On my deckover, I also repurposed the tires from my DRV that had timed out, since I use the deckover more locally and I didnt want timed out tires on the DRV.  It has worked out well and has greater capacity for the deckover as the DRV had Load Range G.  Just mounted them onto the 6 lug 16" wagon wheels that went onto the deckover.  It did raise it a bit higher but that wasnt an issue for me.

Marcel

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I have had previous information that  ST tires must be set at the max psi of tire , but I just talked with Goodyear 800 number and they confirmed that the ST tires , could be set at an appropriate  lower pressure than the max psi  as trailertraveler has suggested .

 

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2 hours ago, TedSchwink said:

...I just talked with Goodyear 800 number and they confirmed that the ST tires , could be set at an appropriate  lower pressure than the max psi...

If the tire manufacturer publishes a tire/load inflation chart, I would take that as an indication that following it is OK. Here is one for Maxxis. I didn't see one on the Carlyle website but you could contact them.

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1 hour ago, elliott&vicky said:

If you change the tires to a higher load range, make sure the rim will take the higher pressure.  The maximum air pressure will be stamped on the back of the rim.

Just because you switch to a higher Load Range does not mean you have to inflate to the Maximum psi. If your weights are within the limits you can use the tire manufactures inflation/load chart. As I mentioned in my previous post, the rims on my previous and current trailer were not marked with a psi rating, just a weight rating. I have heard the same from many other trailer owners with 14 & 15" rims. This tire/wheel dealer has this to say about the issue:  

Quote

What is the maximum psi limitation for your trailer wheels?
Max air capacities are typically a function of the tire, not the wheel. Unlike tires, the load rating of a wheel is not generally dependent on the operating pressure. The wheels themselves are manufactured and tested to a load rating (without consideration of pressure) and can safely support that load. As long as the load is within the limits of our wheel's load rating in pounds, our product will perform as expected.

 

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