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WeBoost oscillation warning?...


KRum

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I have a WeBoost 4G-M which has been installed for a few months (and worked perfectly) - but now I notice every once and a while the 1700/2000 MHz oscillation warning light turns red?... I have both ATT (iPhone) & Verizon (mifi) systems and they both are both boosted 20-30 decibels (even with the red light warning). So my two questions are: Is the 1700/2000 frequency used by ATT or Verizon for LTE?... And how can I shield the antenna better - rewiring the unit to be further apart would be a huge pain! frown emoticon... Right now I only have a small 4x4" metal plate as a base on the roof... Maybe a larger plate to act as a larger shield?....

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Greetings.. I noticed you asked this question in our Internet for RVers Facebook group too, so I thought I'd copy over the reply we gave you there (in case others were curious):

 

For question one.. the bands covered in that frequency range include (found in the 'Understanding Cellular Frequencies' chapter in The Mobile Internet Handbook, starting on page 73 for reference):

1710MHz - 1880MHz: Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile - LTE Band 4 (upload)
1850MHz - 1990MHz: Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile - LTE Band 2. Sprint LTE Band 25.
2110MHz - 2170MHz: Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile - LTE Band 4 (download)

For question #2.. we usually recommend a minimum 8x8" ground plane for optimal signal collection (our article on Ground Planes). The more separation you can get between the interior/exterior antenna the better. If you can't achieve that, then yes - additional shielding can help (beyond the minimum ground plane size).

However, if you're getting oscillation, that can be a sign that you have a strong signal to begin with in those bands, and the booster might not be needed at all.

 

- Cherie

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However, if you're getting oscillation, that can be a sign that you have a strong signal to begin with in those bands, and the booster might not be needed at all.

 

I occasionally have issues with oscillation in the Band 5 (850 Mhz) and Band 12/13 (700 MHz) ranges - which I simply haven't been able to eliminate completely. What's the impact of leaving the booster powered on with the oscillation present? Does it affect communications in the bands where no oscillation is being reported? Does it increase risk of damage to the signal booster or the radios using it? Are there any downsides to it's presence - other than the obvious fact that I'm not getting optimum performance in the affected bands?

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^^^ I don't think it shuts down the whole unit... As I can see on my iPhone that the decibel level drops by 20+ decibels when I place the phone and antenna together.... I have only one of the 4 lights (1700/200) red... the others are green...

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If the amplifier fully complies with the new FCC rules, as I understand it, any oscillation on any band should shut down the entire unit for all bands.

 

 

Gord has told us that there are such regulations, and his and new boosters coming out will need to meet those rules.

 

However, all multi-band mobile boosters with the 2014 FCC approval currently on the market, which includes the weBoost & SignalRF models we've tested in a variety of conditions - currently operate each band independently. MaxAmp is the only one we know of that shuts down the entire unit if only one band is in an unrecoverable oscillation. Whether the other models will need to soon comply or not, is not clear to us.

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Gord has told us that there are such regulations, and his and new boosters coming out will need to meet those rules.

 

However, all multi-band mobile boosters with the 2014 FCC approval currently on the market, which includes the weBoost & SignalRF models we've tested in a variety of conditions - currently operate each band independently. MaxAmp is the only one we know of that shuts down the entire unit if only one band is in an unrecoverable oscillation. Whether the other models will need to soon comply or not, is not clear to us.

That is because they did not meet the new rules . Told the FCC it could not be done . They only were PBA's ( Permit But Ask ) . That could be overturned at any time . The FCC moves slow . But they are moving . Already revoked one sure call license. I am being patient . The Karma Bus is coming . Carriers are calling the shots now. They will have the FCC imposing their will . But I know you don't believe . Me and quite Frankly I don't care.

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