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Tips for bringing her home: 1993 Tioga 24', E350 chassis, 460


A_K_Chesnut

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We're flying out to Dallas and driving our new home back to Denver over the next two days!

 

It's a 1993 Tioga Montara 23'6" on the E350 chassis, 460 motor and OD.

 

Two quick questions that will aid our drive home:

  1. What tire pressure? Different for front and rear?
  2. What's the best interstate speed to help with fuel mileage? We'll be staying off the big interstates and sticking with the smaller highways. I'm not expecting wonders here, but want to maximize our efficiency as much as possible. We'll be traveling unloaded and emptying tanks before departure.

Thank you!

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We have a class A. Tire pressure is based on the load/weight, and your tire mfg probably has a chart online for that. You could check that out once you know the brand/size of the tire and adjust accordingly before you leave. Usually the tire pressure goes up as the weight of the load increases.

 

As far as mileage -- we have found with our larger unit that 55-60 gets us the best mpg.

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If you're able to spare the time with little fuss, I might suggest camping in the area a day or two before heading home. I realize it's used and probably -as is- but staying in the local area might be your best bet at getting quick answers to little questions or issues you might come across when getting familiar with a new (to you) rig. Especially if it's a private party sale, having the previous owner "on tap" might prove helpful.

 

Not a big deal, but the more time you can spend before a long road trip can have a calming affect. B)

 

Speed wise... listen to your rig. From about 50-65mph slowly accelerate over several miles.. then decelerate slowly. Repeat as necessary. You'll find her "sweet spot" where she is able to maintain a constant speed without working too hard and you're not getting periodic gear changes.

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Two quick questions that will aid our drive home:

  1. What tire pressure? Different for front and rear?
  2. What's the best interstate speed to help with fuel mileage? We'll be staying off the big interstates and sticking with the smaller highways. I'm not expecting wonders here, but want to maximize our efficiency as much as possible. We'll be traveling unloaded and emptying tanks before departure.

Assuming the tires are in good condition and are the proper size for the RV, inflate to the max tire pressure that is allowed by the notation on the tire sidewall. That will get you back to Denver. Once home you can weight the rig and fine tune the tire pressure.

 

Speed: 55-60mph will give you pretty good mileage. Don't expect to get better than 7-9 mpg. Don't worry about speed on the interstate, driving 55-60mph is fast enough. Others can pass you and you won't hold up traffic to much.

 

Two days for Dallas to Denver is pushing it in an RV. It can be done but it will be 2 long tiring days. Two days in a car at 70mph is easy, even one long day in a car is doable.

 

Route: Dallas to Amarillo to Dalhart, TX on to Raton, NM and up I-25 to Denver. All good highway Dallas to Raton. If you want to stay off of interstates entirely, take US-287 all the way.

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When you get back to Denver let us know how many hours it took to travel, including all gas, bathroom breaks and food breaks. I'm betting close to 18 hours or more. I know I would be hard pressed to make it in less than 21-22 hours. I'm sure there are folks who will drive an RV at 70-75mph but since I know of very few RV's which are not at max weight or a little over in max weight for the tires, I get scared to drive that fast.

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Check the date of production imprinted on the sidewall of the tires

 

Conventional wisdom is to replace tires after 6 or 7 years regardless of treadwear

Michelin recommends a MAXIMUM of 10 years -- most other Mfg's recommend less

 

Rubber oxidizes from exposure to air, ozone, ultraviolet, etc. (tire rot) -- the tires are full of air @ 50-60 PSI

Even with the best of care, they will deteriorate from the inside out

 

Take care -- your life may depend on it

I speak from experience

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  • 2 months later...

How did the trip turn out?

Fantastic! Not a single hitch, drove fantastically and got 25mpg over two tanks. Even managed to dump the tanks without making a complete fool of ourselves, lol. We're knee deep in renovations and roof repairs, having a blast.

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Fantastic! Not a single hitch, drove fantastically and got 25mpg over two tanks. Even managed to dump the tanks without making a complete fool of ourselves, lol. We're knee deep in renovations and roof repairs, having a blast.

Awesome, glad to hear it!

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