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How to run Windows programs on Linux with CrossOver


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Want to get away from Windows but still use some Windows programs without having to be a guru and mess with dual booting, VMs (Virtual Machines,) and add on programs that can be difficult for the very type of person who thinks Windows is too complicated.

 

There is now a real solution that will run Windows on your Linux machine or Apple Mac, and is AUTOMATED to do that!

 

Before all the gurus come in and talk about wine and display their prowess at VMs and dual boots etc, this article of mine is aimed at folks that think Windows is too complicated. Codeweavers are some of the main supporters of the Wine project and donate all their work to it. https://www.codeweavers.com/about/support-wine

 

It runs MS Office up to 2010, and Quicken, and hundreds of others, even the most popular games.

 

Lots of folks are very unhappy with Microsoft's changes and say they are switching to Apple or Linux, but to be honest I have not read any updates on how long and what percent they use their new hardware and/or software. I have seen one of the many post that they got some hardware but nothing since.

 

To me there are two major issues with a change to another OS, after one really thinks through the trouble they are having with changes to their familiar program. Most folks don't really think because if they don't like changes, like Microsoft moving the Windows start button, (Which I rarely used except to shut down) or eliminating it, I would think they would have even more trouble starting from scratch. Now if they think Microsoft is conspiring against them, it won't be long before they will think the same of Apple/Linux Users.

 

But far and away the biggest issue is usually having to change the programs we use daily. Even people who use Windows and Word/Office like me, retired and not really needing perfect compatibility, that could easily switch to free programs like LibreOffice, won't and don't. Speaking just for me, even when it is free, there is a cost in the learning curve and frankly, my own impatience. So I use Office anyway just because I like the feel and I am a power user. So before one decides to chick their computer out the window because of Windows getting in the way, perhaps they need to think.

 

The two major issues with changing OS are the learning curve, and the costs.

 

Learning Curve:

Both Apple and Linux will involve a major learning curve. Fortunately today, like Windows 10 has Cortana, Apple has Siri to answer any questions and show you the solution. But still a major learning curve.

 

Costs are very high for hardware for a change to OSX and a Mac or Macbook, as opposed to upgrading your Windows computer to Windows 10 or just buying a new computer to be able to load the software you already paid for like Office, Quicked, etc.

 

Out of pocket costs in switching to Linux are nothing as long as you are going totally freeware Linux and are willing to go it alone with just online and forums support. Since you can use the Windows box for Linux, hardware costs aren't high but in most cases you will have to learn all new freeware alternatives to the programs you are used to.

 

Switching to Chrome OS usually is easier buying the new hardware but it is not really advantageous to RVrs because it must be online to even use it. Some will argue and to those please start another thread. This is a broad brushstroke article.

 

But far and away, even for those folks that are willing to buy new hardware and software and go through a learning curve, the critical programs today are really what holds folks back. Besides Photoshop and MS OFFICE, one of the biggest reasons people hesitate is that they use Quicken and already own a Windows version.

 

Now there is a Linux distro that costs from $39.99 - $59.99. That runs those program over Linux and even Macs natively it seems.

 

It's Crossover 15.

 

Excerpt:

 

"Want to move to Linux, but there's this one application that's keeping you stuck on Windows? CodeWeaver's CrossOver Linux may be exactly what you need.

 

Just because there's a Windows application you must use doesn't mean you must run Windows. CodeWeaver's CrossOver Linux enables you to run many popular Windows applications on Linux. Supported Windows applications include Microsoft Office (from Office 97 to Office 2010), Intuit Quicken, and some versions of Adobe Photoshop and Photoshop CS. CrossOver also runs games. For example, you can play such popular online games as World of Warcraft and Guild Wars.

 

Sure, with powerful enough hardware you could run your Windows applications on Linux inside a virtual machine (VM) such as Oracle's VirtualBox. The problem with these is that they don't run well on systems with limited resources. If CrossOver supports the applications you need you won't need to worry with fitting a VM.

 

CrossOver runs many but not all Windows programs. For example, you can run Visio 2010 on CrossOver Linux. AutoCAD? Not so much.

 

Will your program run on Linux, or for that matter CrossOver Mac? CrossOver keeps a complete listing of what runs, and what doesn't. You can also try CrossOver with a 15-day free trial to make sure the software you need works well on a Linux system.

 

CrossOver is based on the open-source project Wine, an implementation of the Windows application programming interface (API) on top of the Unix/Linux operating system family. Wine is a mature project with 20 plus years of work behind it.

Technically, you don't need CrossOver Linux to run Windows applications on Linux. You can do it with Wine alone -- if you know what you're doing. CrossOver gives you automated installation of Windows applications and technical support. In short, CrossOver makes it much easier to install and manage Windows applications on Linux."

 

Much more including screenshots and link to related resources are in the original article here: http://www.zdnet.com/article/how-to-run-windows-programs-on-linux-with-crossover/?tag=nl.e539&s_cid=e539&ttag=e539&ftag=TRE17cfd61

 

If you missed the link to the Crossover Codeweavers website here is the page on it where you can look up your software and see if it runs on it. here is the direct one to tell you which Windows programs run on it for Mac and Linux.

https://www.codeweavers.com/compatibility

 

Hope that helps!

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