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Turbo Boost Sensor


RandyA

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Ran across a You Tube video on replacing the turbo boost sensor on a Volvo D12. OTR Performance seems to believe that this sensor only has a lifespan of 200K miles. They show the sensor as a buck fifty, don't know what Volvo's price is. But "IF" this sensor is subject to degradation I think I will pop a new one into my D12,

 

Does anyone have any first hand factual info that has replaced this sensor that they would be willing to share. I mean if replacement is hype I won't bother, but if it is true I will.

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Randy, I have been considering the OTR egr delete kit in the event I start getting EGR valve codes. OTR recommends replacing the boost sensor when the EGR delete kit is installed. It seems that there should be some kind of test for the correct output from this sensor, but, who knows ? I would love to get better fuel economy but am hesitant to let go of $150.00 just to see if it works......but I think you should do it as a service to your fellow Volvo owners. We would all be most appreciative. Heck, if there are 150 Volvo owners here, each of us could just send you a buck to cover the cost of the sensor. If you will come to the ECR, I'll have my buck ready for you. Carl....how about you ?? Charlie

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The 'test" would be to install a manual gage and plumbing to compare while running. .

 

Another "scenario" could to be watching for black smoke coming out of the stack as it's part of the (input) to the ECM on fueling ratio. Remember that the ECM is also compensating for altitude as that is an operational parameter, temp, humidity, are all part of the 'power' game. The ECM is matching the fuel to the amount of air in the cylinder and power required.

 

All that information on the DID screen is there because the ECM needs it and we "get it free". I'm more inclined to say if you have a reading then the sensor is working.

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While I don't have the same engine, I did replace several sensors a few weeks ago. I went after the Intake Manifold Absolute Pressure (which reads turbo boost) and Exhaust Gas Pressure. Both sensors were less than $50 each, and a quick turn of the wrench to replace. I also at the same time cleaned the intake air temperature sensor (which I do somewhat regularly).

 

I've only driven ~600 miles since the replacement, and don't have a feel yet for the mileage impact. The first 150 miles had a lot of traffic lights (probably about 100, exactly 1 that I passed through without stopping), and the other 450 was into a strong headwind, freezing rain, and snow. What I can say is that it's much more responsive.

 

I think all 3 sensors would read accurately enough steady state, but the layer of crud was slowing any movement of the diaphragms on the pressure sensors, and the soot was acting as a thermal insulator on the temperature sensor.

 

Here's a good read on the subject: http://www.thetruckersreport.com/truckingindustryforum/trucks-eighteen-wheelers-/222173-cummins-isx-cm871-technical-discussion.html

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Should you not be able to look at the sensor levels in normal operation?

If the readings are good, I wouldn't spend the bucks. I found this software

for checking things like that but haven't looked into cost or useability.

http://www.volvoways.com/Pttsoft.html

The catch 22 here is having either a Vocom, 88890020 or Nexiq interface. And, in some cases access to the Master Volvo Server to obtain your trucks original firmware by VIN number. No doubt an owner of such a tool could could recoupe some of the interface cost by bringing such a tool to a HDT rally.

 

Charlie - I will accept a $1 from everyone interested that wants me to buy the sensor with open arms but I strongly suspect that my PayPal account or mail box will not overflow anytime soon. :( .

 

What I DID note on the Volvoways website was a service using the interface and software that links to their server and deletes the EGR function and resultant codes and even another program that deletes the DPF/DEF requirement on newer engines. I am sure both are illegal for highway use but there was no disclaimer.... or cost shared. The legality of the reprogramming leads me to believe getting a Volvo shop with the Vocom, 88890020 or Nexiq interface to perform the service in concert with Volvoways might not be possible. I doubt that a Volvo shop would risk knowingly taking that step. So, it looks like buying a used Vocom, 88890020 or Nexiq interface could be in your future? :D (This one is in the Netherlands and can be here by the 1st of April) http://www.ebay.com/itm/2014-MODEL-88890300-Volvo-VOCOM-Adapter-VCADS-PTT-replaces-88890020-88890180-/151270257555?hash=item233868f393&item=151270257555&pt=Motors_Automotive_Tools&vxp=mtr

 

Well, back to the Turbo Boost Sensor question...........

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Randy, to further hijack your thread:

I have been searching for ways to bring my truck data out to make it useable with my pc.

Of course when I get that done, will still need to map the information into some understandable

format like gauges, charts, and indicators. Have been thinking I might stream the info into MatLab

to fill up and update data locations, then use those values to drive software indicators.

Most of the things I have found are pricey and that shouldn't be. It's just data. Here is the physical layer stuff I have located.

http://www.dgtech.com/product/dpa/manual/DPA_Pinouts_Dec2012.pdf

And the message format

http://www.intrepidcs.com/technologies/j1939.html

also some history and what my cat motor ECM records, or can record.

Electronic Engine Controls
The manufacturers of all diesel engines for commercial vehicles use electronic controls for the
pressurization of the fuel, injection of the fuel and timing. First introduced in the mid 1980’s on busses
and fire trucks, these controls became standard on all heavy-duty engines between 1991 and 1994.
Medium duty engines became standard with these electronic controls in 1998. Both applications were
done as a means of meeting more stringent Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) limits for emissions.
Once these electronic controls took hold, engine manufacturers looked for additional uses of the
computer. Over time, the controls took on additional inputs and outputs, control of power take-off
operation, transmissions, and other ancillary controls. The processing power of these computers started
with simple 8-bit microcontrollers and has now reached the power of 32-bit processors. Memory internal
to the units has grown and the type has changed. It is now common to find nearly a megabyte of memory
with most of it of a non-volatile type with some of it readable/writeable for storing information. The
physical size of the computer has grown somewhat, with connector pin-counts starting at around 30 and
growing to over 140 in some controls today.
The Caterpillar engine control is the most full featured, at least as far as pins on the connector and
storage of information. This engine control stores such items as those shown in Table 2:
Caterpillar
Engine
Control
Data Recorded
State Line Crossing Driver ID Instantaneous Fuel
Economy
Average Fuel Economy Fuel Used Trip Length
Trip Time Trip Average Speed Vehicle Speed
Cruise Set Speed Instantaneous Fuel Rate Engine Load Percent
Engine RPM PTO Set RPM Fuel Temperature
Boost Pressure Coolant Temperature Oil Pressure
Cold Mode on/off Multi Torque on/off Intake Manifold
Temperature
Ambient Air
Temperature
High Coolant Temperature Warning Very High Coolant
Temperature Warning
Low Oil Pressure
Warning
Very Low Oil Pressure Warning Low Coolant Level
Very Low Coolant Level High Intake Air Temperature
Warning
Very High Intake Air
Temperature Warning
Low Voltage Vehicle Overspeed Engine Overspeed
Lifetime Totals for
average fuel economy,
distance, average speed,
fuel used, time, PTO
fuel, PTO time, idle fuel,
idle time, percent idle
time
Leg Totals for average fuel
economy, distance, average speed,
fuel used, time, PTO fuel, PTO
time, idle fuel, idle time and percent
idle time
Trip Totals for average
fuel economy, distance,
average speed, fuel used,
time, PTO fuel, PTO
time, idle fuel, idle time
and percent idle time
Next Preventative
Maintenance
Last Preventative Maintenance Preventative
Maintenance Overdue
Engine Fault Codes Hard Braking Warning
Table 2: Caterpillar Engine Control Has Extensive Information Stored in It.

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Randy, look in the "West coast rally in Sparks nv" thread for LOU10, post #55. He has tons of software and diagnostic equipment and has offered to hook up to trucks at that rally. We should be able to contribute to his plane fare if he would be willing to come to the ECR......or a truckload of Pepsi if he wanted that. My Volvo shop would not even disable some of the shutdowns on my truck. Charlie

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Randy, look in the "West coast rally in Sparks nv" thread for LOU10, post #55. He has tons of software and diagnostic equipment and has offered to hook up to trucks at that rally. We should be able to contribute to his plane fare if he would be willing to come to the ECR......or a truckload of Pepsi if he wanted that. My Volvo shop would not even disable some of the shutdowns on my truck. Charlie

im right here. as long as i can get coverage for my parent with alzheimers (usually my wife can cover me) , im all in for helping others at any of the 3 rallys. and help to defray plane costs would be a huge bonus... let alone Pepsi.... :-D

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The catch 22 here is having either a Vocom, 88890020 or Nexiq interface. And, in some cases access to the Master Volvo Server to obtain your trucks original firmware by VIN number. No doubt an owner of such a tool could could recoupe some of the interface cost by bringing such a tool to a HDT rally.

 

Charlie - I will accept a $1 from everyone interested that wants me to buy the sensor with open arms but I strongly suspect that my PayPal account or mail box will not overflow anytime soon. :( .

 

What I DID note on the Volvoways website was a service using the interface and software that links to their server and deletes the EGR function and resultant codes and even another program that deletes the DPF/DEF requirement on newer engines. I am sure both are illegal for highway use but there was no disclaimer.... or cost shared. The legality of the reprogramming leads me to believe getting a Volvo shop with the Vocom, 88890020 or Nexiq interface to perform the service in concert with Volvoways might not be possible. I doubt that a Volvo shop would risk knowingly taking that step. So, it looks like buying a used Vocom, 88890020 or Nexiq interface could be in your future? :D (This one is in the Netherlands and can be here by the 1st of April) http://www.ebay.com/itm/2014-MODEL-88890300-Volvo-VOCOM-Adapter-VCADS-PTT-replaces-88890020-88890180-/151270257555?hash=item233868f393&item=151270257555&pt=Motors_Automotive_Tools&vxp=mtr

 

Well, back to the Turbo Boost Sensor question...........

i got a nexiq interface as well as another different branded one. the other branded one says it works with the volvo PTT software and is tested to work with it.

none of this stuff is cheap.

 

i dont have access to the online servers for ECM firmware , NOR am i willing to try it on a ECM that *I* dont own. im not willing to take a chance on making a $4,000 paperweight.

 

if your considering the Delete Kits you better grab one before the EPA finds them and shuts them down like they have done to alot of other manufactures making delete kits.

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We haven't heard your decision Prof. did you decide to replace or clean or what?

I have kept on looking at ways to get into the data bus and think this might be a

$30 way to bring that flow to the laptop, tell me what you think. http://elmelectronics.com/DSheets/ELM327DS.pdf

I like what I saw but would need more time to digest and research the project further before seriously considering jumping into a build. These things look simple in schematic form but can add up to a whole lot of unanticipated money spent by the time it is completed and working. I built an interface for the 1988 non-OBD2 GM data stream to a standard RS232 bus with a simple BASIC program to decode the data into readable scan lines back in '96. So, this is not a new idea for me. But, while having a "Scan Tool" for the J1932 bus would be nice, many of the scan functions are already available in the Volvo VN DID. What I would really like to have is a tool to modify the user parameters in the EECM that are doable without going through the Volvo server.

 

BTW - there is some "interesting" stuff coming out of China that ranges from $120 to $350. Check the link to this one but be aware it may expire soon and become a dead link. Considering all the cables, etc. included the price is OK. Of course you never know if it will actually work or not. That is where the Ebay purchaser guarantee is a nice feature. Actually, I have bought a number of electronic assemblies from China and have had zero failures. They are well cloned from OEM products.

 

Nothing further on the boost sensor until we get back to home ground in April. I will pull mine out once the truck is not needed to get us home, give it an eyeball and make a decision on to replace or not.

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