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2015 Ford Edge Toad: Is a Battery Charge Line Sufficient


PrescillaM

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I will be a solo RVer. I plan on towing my 2015 Ford Edge behind my Class C RV. A couple of weeks ago I had the base plate, Invisibrake, etc. put on the car so that when I go up to get my RV I can tow my car back. In the car owner's manual it states the car must be in neutral and the black (ground) connection on the battery is to be disconnected so that the battery doesn't drain while being towed. The shop who installed everything stated that they put a battery charge line on the car so that I won't need to disconnect the black cable on the battery and that if my battery does drain (which didn't give me much confidence) then they can possible put a switch in to disconnect the cable because the battery is very difficult to reach.

Is anyone towing a Ford Edge who has had a charge line put in, and if so, have you had any issues.

Since I will be a solo RVer, with my two dogs, I would prefer to address all of these issues ahead of time.

 

Thank you

Prescilla

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In 2013 we traveled for apx 70 days with friends towing an Edge. We covered over 6,000 miles. They had a charge line and never had a problem with the car. In fact, because of theif success, about halfway through the trip I ordered a charge line setup for my car that began to give me problems.

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In 2013 we traveled for apx 70 days with friends towing an Edge. We covered over 6,000 miles. They had a charge line and never had a problem with the car. In fact, because of theif success, about halfway through the trip I ordered a charge line setup for my car that began to give me problems.

Thank you so much for your reply. The shop I took it to does this on a daily basis so I felt confident they knew what they were talking about but being that I will be going solo I wanted to find out from someone who has experience.

 

Thank you.

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While either method will work, supplying power from the RV to the car is probably the better way. In addition, some auxiliary braking systems rely upon the car battery for power and lifting the battery cable would then disable them and if you have braking on the towed car, lifting the battery cable also disables the car's ABS system from working with the auxiliary brake system.

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While either method will work, supplying power from the RV to the car is probably the better way. In addition, some auxiliary braking systems rely upon the car battery for power and lifting the battery cable would then disable them and if you have braking on the towed car, lifting the battery cable also disables the car's ABS system from working with the auxiliary brake system.

Does the Ford Edge have some sort of braking system that allows the ABS to work w/o the engine running and/or the ignition turned off. Most automotive brakes that I know of require vacuum from the engine for the ABS system to quickly engage and disengage the brakes.

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Does the Ford Edge have some sort of braking system that allows the ABS to work w/o the engine running and/or the ignition turned off. Most automotive brakes that I know of require vacuum from the engine for the ABS system to quickly engage and disengage the brakes.

Al, I had an Invisibrake installed on the car. I do not know about the ABS system. I was told that if I were to have to disconnect the black ground cable that it would be extremely difficult for me to do so due to its location.

 

I imagine that if I get in a situation where the battery is dead I will have to have it jumped. I am hoping to avoid that. It sounds as though the way it was set up, with the power coming from the RV, will work.

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Does the Ford Edge have some sort of braking system that allows the ABS to work w/o the engine running and/or the ignition turned off. Most automotive brakes that I know of require vacuum from the engine for the ABS system to quickly engage and disengage the brakes.

The ABS is not a part of the power brake system which does require that the engine be operating, Federal law requires that the brake system must be operational without the engine running and has for many years. This was done to insure that if the engine were to totally loose power or electrical supply, you will still be able to both steer and brake, although with more difficulty. The ABS system is operative without the engine running but I believe that it does require the battery to be in place and connected. There may be someone here more up on that than I, but I know that it does operated and assume that it needs 12V. Or at least that is what I was told by a tech who I thought knew what he was talking about. According to what I have been reading they use a "hall effect sensor" on each wheel to detect wheel speed and a circuit to compare them, which does require electricity.

 

HOW ANTILOCK BRAKES WORK

All antilock brake systems control tire slip by monitoring the relative deceleration rates of the wheels during braking. If one wheel starts to slow at a faster rate than the others, or at a faster rate than that which is programmed into the antilock control module, it indicates the wheel is starting to slip and is in danger of breaking traction and locking up. The ABS system responds by momentarily reducing hydraulic pressure to the brake on the affected wheel or wheels.

Electrically operated solenoid valves are used to hold, release and reapply hydraulic pressure to the brakes. This produces a pulsating effect, which can usually be felt in the brake pedal during hard braking. The driver may also hear a buzzing or chattering noise from the ABS hydraulic unit.

The rapid modulation of brake pressure in the brake circuit reduces the braking load on the slipping wheel and allows it to regain traction, thus preventing lockup. It is the same as pumping the brakes, except that the ABS system does it automatically for each brake circuit, and at speeds that would be humanly impossible, up to dozens of times per second depending on the system (some are faster than others).

Once the rate of deceleration for the affected wheel comes back in line with the others, normal braking function and pressure resume, and antilock reverts to a passive mode.

The above quote comes from AA1 Car on the internet.

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Get the statement that everything will be fine IN WRITING.

We tow a Ford Fiesta and the Ford directions for towing specifically state that the negative connection must be disconnected.

(to avoid damage to the electronically controlled transmission).

We had a knife switch installed on the negative terminal to make that easy.

When you have it setup with the knife switch you can tie the negative connection for the charging system to the battery terminal side of the knife switch and use the knife switch to isolate the rest of the car.

 

Also check what is being done for running and brake lights when towing.

To ensure that there was no feedback into the car (risking damage to the transmission again!) a complete new bulb holder was put into the rear lights hooked directly to the RV turn and brake signals. Some setups will put diodes into the car wiring to prevent feedback, but the manufacturer of the tow subframe we had installed stated that that wasn't suitable for the Fiesta.

 

Modern electronic controls in cars can be very complex. If the system you install damages anything, the warranty (Including any extended warranty you may have purchased) will not cover it.

 

BnB

 

 

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Get the statement that everything will be fine IN WRITING.

We tow a Ford Fiesta and the Ford directions for towing specifically state that the negative connection must be disconnected.

(to avoid damage to the electronically controlled transmission).

We had a knife switch installed on the negative terminal to make that easy.

When you have it setup with the knife switch you can tie the negative connection for the charging system to the battery terminal side of the knife switch and use the knife switch to isolate the rest of the car.

 

Also check what is being done for running and brake lights when towing.

To ensure that there was no feedback into the car (risking damage to the transmission again!) a complete new bulb holder was put into the rear lights hooked directly to the RV turn and brake signals. Some setups will put diodes into the car wiring to prevent feedback, but the manufacturer of the tow subframe we had installed stated that that wasn't suitable for the Fiesta.

 

Modern electronic controls in cars can be very complex. If the system you install damages anything, the warranty (Including any extended warranty you may have purchased) will not cover it.

 

BnB

 

 

BnB, the shop did a demonstration with me and went through a detailed installation procedure using their pickup truck (because I don't have the RV yet) and all of the brakes, turn signals, and running lights are operational on the car through the RV hookup. I will ask about the knife switch. I know that the owner looked up a "switch" online to find out if it was required for the Edge and it stated no. But, I will ask them again. Thank you.

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The ABS is not a part of the power brake system which does require that the engine be operating, Federal law requires that the brake system must be operational without the engine running and has for many years. This was done to insure that if the engine were to totally loose power or electrical supply, you will still be able to both steer and brake, although with more difficulty. The ABS system is operative without the engine running but I believe that it does require the battery to be in place and connected. There may be someone here more up on that than I, but I know that it does operated and assume that it needs 12V. Or at least that is what I was told by a tech who I thought knew what he was talking about. According to what I have been reading they use a "hall effect sensor" on each wheel to detect wheel speed and a circuit to compare them, which does require electricity.

"HOW ANTILOCK BRAKES WORK

All antilock brake systems control tire slip by monitoring the relative deceleration rates of the wheels during braking. If one wheel starts to slow at a faster rate than the others, or at a faster rate than that which is programmed into the antilock control module, it indicates the wheel is starting to slip and is in danger of breaking traction and locking up. The ABS system responds by momentarily reducing hydraulic pressure to the brake on the affected wheel or wheels.

Electrically operated solenoid valves are used to hold, release and reapply hydraulic pressure to the brakes. This produces a pulsating effect, which can usually be felt in the brake pedal during hard braking. The driver may also hear a buzzing or chattering noise from the ABS hydraulic unit.

The rapid modulation of brake pressure in the brake circuit reduces the braking load on the slipping wheel and allows it to regain traction, thus preventing lockup. It is the same as pumping the brakes, except that the ABS system does it automatically for each brake circuit, and at speeds that would be humanly impossible, up to dozens of times per second depending on the system (some are faster than others).

Once the rate of deceleration for the affected wheel comes back in line with the others, normal braking function and pressure resume, and antilock reverts to a passive mode."

 

The above quote comes from AA1 Car on the internet.

Kirk,

Thank you for the good info. I believe you are absolutely correct about the ABS working w/o the engine running. It also sure makes sense that for the ABS to work you will have to have 12V available. I was tying the power brake system in with the ABS system. My bad.

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No problem, Al. I was not so sure once you asked about that but what I went back and did a bit of research to be sure that my memory of how those systems work was still at least close to accurate. We all have those moments and as the years have gone by I find it happens to be more frequently. <_<

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I did some online research and this document from FMCA gives all the models that can be flat towed and under what conditions.

Thanks for posting that. I had not been aware of it but haven't kept up with the tow vehicle side as much since we moved back to trailers. It looks very much like the Dingy Guide from Motorhome Magazine. Doing a search, I also found one from Towing World that looks to have pretty much the same information.

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Thanks for posting that. I had not been aware of it but haven't kept up with the tow vehicle side as much since we moved back to trailers. It looks very much like the Dingy Guide from Motorhome Magazine. Doing a search, I also found one from Towing World that looks to have pretty much the same information.

The Dinghy Guide was the one I used to narrow down which type of vehicle I wanted to go test drive. I would have preferred a lighter vehicle but I needed an SUV for future requirements. Once I had narrowed it down to three different vehicles I went for test drives and I liked the Edge the best. Plus, I like Ford products.

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