Chris-n-Dennis

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About Chris-n-Dennis

  • Rank
    Senior Member
  • Birthday 11/01/1957

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    116603
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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Washington
  • Interests
    Scuba, Learning, Computers
  1. Finished the trip today. The grades were more pronounced and the curves tighter on the segment north of John Day. Road is simply outstanding. Smooth, very few patches and none needed. Traffic extremely light - I believe we counted 6 semi's over the whole 6 hour trip, all going the other way. Yes, 6 hours, most attributable to the 35/40/45 speeds on the northern leg due to curves and grades. Nothing too steep, just taking it slow because another curve would come along. We have our hidey hole mostly planned out for August and we have a couple of fall backs just in case and we WILL be seeing the eclipse in August in Oregon.
  2. Anyone traveled this route? Looking for a north trek to get up to Pendleton or I-84. Oddly enough, we've always gone on 20 east/west and 78. Never a north/south route.
  3. While being shown EVERYTHING on the coach, take notes on look/fit/operation and stop the presenter when you have a question while it is fresh in your mind. Write it down, do not rely on mental notes as they are sure to get jumbled will all the new you are about to discover. The pre-delivery inspection is your opportunity to correct things that appear wrong, learn things you may not have known, and uncover things tucked away or hidden. If your presenter says he/she doesn't know about something that is not necessarily a bad thing, just be sure to hold him/her to finding out (take more notes!) Some people go from one end to the other, outside to in or vice versa. Other go from system to system. Pick which one you are most comfortable with (or accept the presenter's method) and once you do, do not succumb to the shiney; stick with it and, did I already mention it? TAKE NOTES! Don't be surprised of some bobbles or glitches, they are bound to happen but the more detailed you are during pre-delivery, the better you'll be - in getting set up and in your own knowledge of your new rig. Once you have taken delivery - TAKE NOTES. Enjoy and safe travels to you.
  4. Too many factors involved in this tragic accident. Such things as instinctively getting off the gas (instead of the correct thing - getting on the gas), braking, over correcting, loading on the mh and yes, speed. Also location. Crashing through an abutment and down into a draw is far worse then going off on a level shoulder. A combination of dangerous things came together resulting the deaths of two hence making it newsworthy. Does it happen more to motorhomes vs 5'ers? I doubt it. Same holds true on heading down the highway - motorhome or 5'er or TT, there will be some who will drive faster. I for one will keep to a modest speed part for safety and a good part for economy.
  5. I can't agree with the topic title. I would say the new forum is different but I can't find even one area that comes close to horrible. Yep, looks different and acts a bit different and that name reversion was sure a kicker but it does look like a workable and usable forum. Shame the no warning but shhhh, erm, um, "it" happens.
  6. I break our budget down for RV expenses and household expenses. RV expenses budget (includes average amortized fuel expenses, propane, tires, batteries, oil changes w/filters, roadside assistance and warranties (if we have one, we don't currently), club memberships, registration, insurance, and a storage unit rental (going away this year) and lastly, a $100 miscellaneous fund). Monthly budget: $823.64 Household expenses (includes toad insurance, registration, amortized fuel and maintenance) in addition to food, clothing allowance, cell phones, entertainment (amazon prime) and an amortized park fee. Monthly budget: $1318.67 We also set aside $100/month for contingency to cover something unexpected. Total monthly budget: $2242.31 Note: No outstanding debt and I am retired military so no medical budget needed. We do have a significant amount invested in funds to act as a catastrophic contingency. That puts us right in line with the curve graph Wheelin It has and I notice we do some of the same things they do to control costs such as volunteering.
  7. RV-Dreams has made up some sheets and workbooks you might be interested. They ain't free but they are inexpensive: http://www.rv-dreams.com/spreadsheet-downloads.html
  8. Watered the batteries as part of monthly maintenance. Reset the side shade so it would work better - forecasted 80's later this week. Tested patio chairs for comfort.Conducted several eyelid light leak tests.
  9. We had a 24ft class C to start and thought a 33ft class A would suit us just fine. After a year though we found we were not comfortable and ended up with a 41ft (tons of room and cargo capacity coupled with a oh so smooth ride). So... Just like any RV hunter, first and foremost, find the floorplan you not just can live with but the one you really, really like. Chances are you'll find it in the range of 36 to 38ft for a class A diesel pusher and while that may sound like a big jump consider this: going just 5ft longer will usually get you amenities such as a larger bed, washer/dryer and some extra living space. I lean toward diesel for many reasons but to name a few: 1) straight up smoother, quieter ride 2) typically a more stable driving platform 3) mechanical longevity 4) cargo/towing capacity. Score a test drive of a diesel pusher, I'm sure you'll agree.
  10. On shower, if you want to keep that shower head: Take a ziploc bag what will fit over the whole showerhead (will probably need to take out of the holder). Now pour vinegar into the ziploc bag with the showerhead. Close up with a rubberband or tape. What you want is to have the showerhead submerged in the vinegar for a good 12 to 18 hours. Once done,remove the bag and test it. If the flow has improved then what you have is some concretions from hard water. You can keep with the vinegar routine or use a commercial product such as CLR to clean up that showerhead. Personally, I would probably go with a replacement such as an Oxygenics which may save you water while still giving you one heck of a nice shower. GFCI - as already mentioned, you'll need to test all the outlets on that one circuit to find the reset button. Not a bad thing to do anyway so you have a better idea of what outlets are all on one circuit. You also get to find out if there are other circuits - can be revealing how the builder split up things.
  11. Okay,sorry but I can't resist. (Though I did take into consideration the injuries were minor) Hey honey, pull my finger.
  12. This is the same as the Winnebago Tour. As Clay says, that's a pretty good price especially considering the low mileage. You may be able to negotiate an additional 5-10% off since the latest trend is a shorter/smaller rig. Only a personal opinion and doesn't speak to quality of build or anything else: We looked at the Tour during our shopping and while impressed with the rig I did have misgivings about the full body slide so took a pass on it. Again, that's just a personal thing based only on a gut feeling, no bad experience or otherwise.
  13. Sorry, don't and won't carry a spare. We use the money and cargo weight saved elsewhere. I will admit I'm pretty anal when it comes to my weights and individual tire pressures; keeping them well within safe operating parameters and our budget is based on a 7 year lifespan on the tires.
  14. If the park uses average pricing, then a month site costs will range between $900 to $1500 a month ($30 to $50/day). The note said 15-20 hours per week so high side call it 80 hours for 4 weeks. $11.25/hour. Of course, when volunteering its not the hourly wage but the location and love of doing it. Personally, we would pass only because it seems to involve cleaning bathrooms and the pool, something neither of us are interested in. Beautiful area.
  15. AM Solar did some tests a few years back and found the existing technology had a design flaw that caused "cupping" where the cells would warp and form cups in each segment. Jason and Nikki Wynn found similar problems if I recall correctly and have since returned to the rigid construction. This new stuff is exciting if all the marketing hype is true. A 10% gain over rigid goes a long way in overcoming the cost differences and looks to be more efficient than the older flexible sticky panels. I do note however, it is a prototype/concept and there doesn't appear to be any actual production as of yet. I would be very much interested if/when they do come to market. Until then, this could be like that MIT project where they were using deskjet printers to print a solar cell on a strip of film - sort of disappeared didn't it?