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Counteract blancing for tires


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I'm needing a new set of tires. I have a

1999 Winnebago Ultimate Freedom on a Freightliner Chassis with a set of Goodyear

G670 - 275/80R22.5 / load range H that are 9 years old and like new. I'm thinking of buying a set of Michelin this time.

My question is:

1: do I need 16ply.

2: do they all need to be balanced;

3: anyone ever used "Counteract beads" for balancing?

4: does anyone have a suggestion for this size

 

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Number 1 - Highly likely YES

The 16ply rating or Load Range H (same thing) just gives a broad picture of the load carrying capacity of the tire.

The more specific number you need to know is the Load carrying capacity, which will be embossed on the side of the tire.

It will read something like this... MAX LOAD SINGLE xxxx KG (7160 lbs) @ xxx kPa (125 PSI) Then just below there will be the same information for the DUAL configuration (probably 6610 lbs @ 125 psi)

There are Load range G tires made in this size but they only carry 6175 lbs Single and 6005 lbs. Dual.

Sometimes manufacturers put Load Range H on the front and Load Range G on the rear so double check this. But to the best of my knowledge the G670 only comes in Load Range H.

Depending on your actual loads (you would need to get weighed by wheel position to know these) you might be able to put Load Range G on the rear but there is no way to know for sure unless we know your Rear GAWR (Gross Axle Weight Rating) to make sure the Load Range G tire would indeed cover the Rear GAWR and then know the actual load on the tire after weighing. Conclusion is that it definitely would be best to stay with tires that provide 7160 lbs capacity Single and 6610 lbs capacity dual. (for this tire that means Load Range H or 16 ply rating)

 

It is always good to get weighed by wheel position before purchasing tires to know your actual weights so that the tires bought will be able to properly carry the load with sufficient reserve capacity (or safety margin). Frequently in the RV world these beasts seem to find a way to get weights over the ratings.

 

Number 2

Balancing is always a good thing to do.

And Dynamic balancing is the best method. After that there are varying opinions. (Number 3)

 

Number 4

Michelin Options for 275/80R22.5

The XZE Regional tire provides the proper Load Carrying Capacity of 7160 lbs Single and 6610 Dual

The XZA3+ gives the option of both Load Range H and Load Range G (lower load carrying capacity, which may not work in this situation)

The XZE2 only comes in Load Range G (6175 lbs Single) which is not likely to be sufficient for this application.

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I'm needing a new set of tires. I have a

1999 Winnebago Ultimate Freedom on a Freightliner Chassis with a set of Goodyear

G670 - 275/80R22.5 / load range H that are 9 years old and like new. I'm thinking of buying a set of Michelin this time.

My question is:

1: do I need 16ply.

2: do they all need to be balanced;

3: anyone ever used "Counteract beads" for balancing?

4: does anyone have a suggestion for this size

 

Yes, stay with LRH tires. You have slightly more weight capacity on your tires that on your axles ...a great situation to be in.

 

Better if all are balanced, but some folks balance only the front.

 

I have not used balancing beads, and do not plan to.

 

I am on my second set of Continental HSLs. They cost apx $100 less per tire than the comparable Michelin XZA which I have had trouble finding, and the ride, handling, and wear have been superb. I have bought the Continentals at Best Tire locations in AL and OH, and at Southern Tire Mart in TX. I replace mine at 7 yrs ...will be doing the rears in the next month or two.

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I recommend staying with the same load rating and size as the mfgr's. tire placard states. Why Michelin?

I asked a friend, who is a Michelin dealer about the sidewall cracks. He said Michelin has a patent on their rubber formula (no-one else can use it). This formula is designed to be used regularly to release the compounds that prevent cracks, aging, etc. Sitting for extended periods allows the tires to dry-out from lack of these compounds rising to the surface and protecting the tire.

If you plan to be driving most of the time, Michelin's should be OK on your MH.

More and more MH owners are switching from Michelin, Goodyear, Firestone, etc,; to Hankook, Sailun, Continental, etc. because they are never concerned about wearing tires down to wear indicators, just aging out.

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