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Content Blocked?


oletimer

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We started being a "longtimer" in 1995, and needed to have internet for paying bills, and keeping track of friends, and family, etc. We have been the whole route, Pocketmail, phone cards, computer cards, and so on. About 8-9 years ago we bought a satellite system from Maxwell Satellite, because we do a lot of desert camping in the SW with NO cellular service. We have gotten along kinda' OK. We have looked at the StarBand(sp) system, because I think Hughes is going to do away with anything that is not "spot beamed", and I not sure if StarBand will or not, so I'm just getting along. When we came to NE Kansas for Christmas, I had trouble setting up, because I kept getting "content blocked because it was not signed by a valid security code" message. I went to Hughesnet "deep tec" ($129.99) they said they could help but pay first, wasted money!! I have a neighbor that is a installer, $100, not wasted money, but had to dig up a pre Windows7 computer, so I could display "blocked content". I sure don't want to carry an extra OLD computer around. Any ideas, or is the satellite system just dying? Thanks for any help. Dick T

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Ditch your satellite and go with cellular...Verizon if you only want to pay for one, or a combination of Verizon and AT&T for maximum coverage.

 

We used to use satellite, too (from Maxwell), but gave it up years ago and haven't looked back. I don't know where in the desert Southwest you boondock, but we do a lot of boondocking in the desert Southwest, too (principally Arizona) and haven't been any place where we couldn't get a signal...nowadays it's almost always 4G. The only place we've been recently where we can't get a cell signal is when we're in Death Valley staying at the northern-most campground, Mesquite Springs. However, if we were willing to move down to Furnace Creek, there's a 3G signal there.

 

We use our smartphone as a hotspot, but you could also get a mobile hotspot device.

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Grab a bootable Linux CD and just reboot to it when you need to get online, free to download and safer to use as it goes back to a clean configuration at every reboot.

 

Chromium (Google's free version of Chrome) your Linux's browser or Firefox may be available for your use. On OpenSuse, the one I use Konquer and Firefox are offered by default.

 

 

Go here: https://software.opensuse.org/132/en

 

Click the link: "Click here to display these alternative versions."

 

Set your download option to: "Direct Link"

 

Set your PC type or just pick 32 bit that will run anywhere.

 

Click the download button.

 

This is about 850 MB so grabbing it off a WiFi link is a good idea. You can burn it to a DVD or to a USB stick.

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Grab a bootable Linux CD and just reboot to it when you need to get online, free to download and safer to use as it goes back to a clean configuration at every reboot.

 

+1 to what Stanley said. There are lots of choices. Here is a brief review of 5 of them: http://www.linux.com/learn/tutorials/377416:the-five-best-linux-live-cds

 

I have used Knoppix for years as a way to get into broken Windows PCs and get them to work again. You boot it from a CDROM (or DVD or USB stick if your hardware will let you) but it still will see your Windows partitions and your files! Comes with a browser called "Iceweasel" so worth getting just to say that your browser is Iceweasel.

 

WDR

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