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AquaDawg

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About AquaDawg

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    La Grande, OR

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  1. I think it's not so much as it's 3g only, as it is the LTE (4G) signal does not cover as many miles as the 3g signal will when coming from the same tower. In my hunting area there is one tower that can be picked up. The LTE signal comes and goes as I walk around, but it always resorts to 3G when the LTE signal fades. This distance limitation is a direct result of the technology. As we progress from one "G" to another "G", each transition results is less coverage. There are still areas in the mountainous parts of the PNW, in which we previously had coverage with analog (1G), and have never gotten coverage back. This reduced coverage distance is going to only get worse as they transition to 5G. They call it progress, but I'd take my old analog 3 watt bag phone back in a heart beat.
  2. You do realize that Verizon will be shutting down their entire CDMA network on Dec 31st, right? It's been in the works since 2016.
  3. If the tower is overloaded, everyone using it gets their connection slowed down. With throttling, you as an individual are being targeted by the cell carrier, and your connection is slowed down. Most likely because you used too much data.
  4. It may be old Rich, but in some areas of our country it's the only way you can get a signal.
  5. Here is some corroboration for you Art: https://www.droid-life.com/2018/07/16/verizon-3g-phones-rip/ "For several years we’ve been been publicly saying that our 3G CDMA network will remain available through the end of 2019. Virtually all traffic on our network is on our 4G LTE network. To facilitate a smooth transition to 4G LTE capable products and services, we are no longer allowing devices that are not 4G LTE capable to be activated on our network."
  6. Yep, we saw the same decease in coverage thing when they forced us from analog, to CDMA 1x, to CDMA EVDO, to LTE. Every time they changed we lost more coverage. GSM was even worse. I long for the days of my old 3 watt bag phone and the coverage I could get with it, and being able to make the call when I needed to. Unfortunately with the push for 5g, building out new towers in remote areas is going to get pushed way down to the bottom of the priority list.
  7. I have not heard that, but I did read a report the other day that said 30% of Verizon's towers already do not have CDMA (3G) on them. It's going to suck, because CDMA has a further reach than LTE, and here in NE Oregon there are areas where you can get a good lock on the tower with CDMA, but LTE bounces in and out.
  8. https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/49/31301 "(2) “commerce” means trade, traffic, and transportation—" http://law2.umkc.edu/faculty/projects/ftrials/conlaw/statecommerce.htm "So. Pacific Co. v Arizona (1945) demonstrates that state laws might violate the Commerce Clause even when in-state and out-of-state commerce are treated equally. The case involved a challenge to Arizona's law prohibiting trains from crossing the state that contained more than 70 freight cars. Southern Pacific complained that the law required them to choose between disassembling at the Arizona border larger trains, making two runs across the state, and then reassembling the trains or avoiding Arizona altogether. Arizona argued the law was a safety measure designed to minimize the risk of "slack action" accidents to which longer trains are susceptible. The Court applied a test that balanced the state's safety interest against what it saw as the very substantial burden the law imposed on interstate commerce. The law was struck down. The same test was used in 1959 to strike down an Illinois law requiring trucks to have contoured rear fender mudguards rather than the straight mud guard flaps required by most other states (Bibb v Navajo Freight) and in 1978 to invalidate a Wisconsin law that limited truck length to 55 feet at a time when most long haul truck lines had gone to 65 foot trucks (Raymond Motor Transportation v Rice)." Because of the Interstate Commerce clause of the constitution, states are required to allow a vehicle that is legal in it's home state, to travel freely through that state. Nothing in the clause says it applies to commercial vehicles only.
  9. I would submit that vehicle length is no different than having your windows tinted. For example Washington state allows a darker tint than California. When I was driving my pickup in heavy traffic in California I was pulled over by a SP for my windows being too dark. I told him they are legal in Washington state (where my vehicle was registered at the time). After checking my drivers license and registration he told me to have a nice day and sent me on my way.
  10. Your the LE SME, but this falls under the same code as if your home state does not require an RV endorsement on your drivers license and you travel to a state that does require one. The foreign state has to recognize your driving privileged from your home state, and can't not let you drive your vehicle there because you dont have an RV endorsement.
  11. I have never been able to find the actual code, but my understanding is that by federal law, if the vehicle is legal in the state it's registered in, all states that have received federal funding for roadway construction, or maintenance, are required to allow your vehicle(s) on those roadways that those funds are used on.
  12. I finally got my card a couple of days ago, and I can say that if they didn't try any harder, they couldn't have made it look any more like an unofficial government issued ID. Truly is pathetic, and I can't believe they made us wait 3 years to get this POS. It's like a video store rental ID card that in no way shape or form resembles a government issued ID card, with a stamp on it that says "enttiles bearer to all discounts for veterans". It's pretty disrespectful what they came up with.
  13. Gord, Any updates on when this will be out? TMO has band 12 (700mhz), so I think it would be safe to assume that it's close enough to VZW band 13 (700mhz) to boost both of those bands. The big question is will this new amp be able to boost CDMA 1X at 800-850mhz? For the mountain areas of the west, these are the critical bands: band 12 (700) att, tmobile. USCC band 13 (700) VZW CDMA BC0 BC10 (800-850) VZW, USCC band 71 (600) Tmobile, USCC So basically it needs to boost from 600 through 900 mhz and life would be wonderful.
  14. RV, Microsoft has totally ruined Skype since they took over. Google Duo for video calling is vastly superior, and unlike ioS facetime, it works on both iphones and android. No ads, and no stuttering audio. Here is a good write up: https://www.lifewire.com/google-duo-review-4075474
  15. Is this going to be an entirely new amp, and will it be T-mobile only? Or will it still boost Verizon/USCC CDMA 1x along with band 71?
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