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Dan & Jen Nevada

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About Dan & Jen Nevada

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    Full Member

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  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • Location
    Reno, NV (for now)
  • Interests
    RVing, YouTubers, outdoors, travel

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    137542
  1. How much time should I spend in new domicile state?

    We just domiciled in TX. It was easy. As we understand it, TX no longer accepts Escapees documentation for proof of residency. You need your vehicle registration and one other piece of proof. Escapees told us to use our proof of insurance with our new address and that worked. Other than that it was easy. We spent several days there, mostly pleasure since it only took half a day to register our Jeep and get a drivers license...and that was with an hour round trip to the Cleveland DMV since the Livingston DMV was closed at the time due to flood damage from the hurricane. As we said earlier, we unregistered our Jeep in Nevada and though we're still here until we hit the road in a few weeks, we're Texas citizens. It's where you come from that determines the hoops you must jump through, assuming you pick a full time traveler friendly state like TX, SD or FL. Nevada won't miss us. California, for instance, probably would have and we'd have to provide a lot more than a drivers license and license plate to not be considered tax evaders if they decided to press the issue. That's where banks, churches, doctors, etc., etc. come into play. Without a mortgage or lease agreement it's tough to prove you "live" in another state.
  2. What type of RV do you Full time in?

    That's dead on. Living in whatever is the most popular isn't necessary what's right for you. Everyone's needs are different. We haven't made the most popular choice in getting a 32 foot gas motorhome, though it's not the least popular either. But it works for us on many levels and that all that really matters. I suspect the OP isn't going to buy the most popular but listening to the reasons people chose their rig and applying that to your own situation is far more valuable. We wanted small for maneuverability, more choice in campgrounds and to make getting to boondocking spots a bit easier. We chose gas because it's in our price range and they are simpler and less expensive to maintain and repair. We wanted a class A for storage and because we love our Jeep. We used to have a big, diesel pickup. If we still did, we might be looking at fifth wheels but we don't.
  3. Campground Integrity

    As with boondocking, looting campgrounds is pretty low value. I'm sure there is petty theft born of opportunity and lack of morals but not usually worth it for "pros" to be interested. Generators are probably the biggest attraction but the risk/reward is probably pretty low. Lock you rig, run a chain or cable through the pricey stuff and enjoy life. And if you're in a campground that makes you think your stuff is going to be stolen at any moment, why are you there? Your house has wheels. Move on.
  4. Changing Domicile to TX Plan?

    Sounds like were good to go. Two days is enough. We're bring our Nevada Real ID licenses and Passports. Not sure why a Real ID from another state isn't good enough but whatever. We've got all that handled. We just wanted to make sure two days was enough time to get it all done. We will update our wills once we're domiciled. We don't have the kind of estate where you need lawyers. You have to actually have assets and money
  5. Changing Domicile to TX Plan?

    Thanks! Should have mentioned. We're coming from Nevada. Our MH is on a 22,000 lbs chassis so no special tests or special license. Even so, we won't register that until we get it in Dec. In the meantime, we'll be living in Nevada. Out dealer will deliver it to us at the California/Nevada state line (so he doesn't have to remit CA sales tax) and the finance company, Essex, will take care of all the titling and sales tax in TX. At that point, we will out out of our apartment and living in our rig. We could wander to TX but it's a long haul from Nevada and if we went over 30 days, we'd have to register in Nevada...$2030!
  6. Scheduling stops

    We're not full time yet but that post gives me anxiety. Seems to me, and what do I know, that you're over thinking things a bit much. Maybe just drift a little until the right balance strikes you. Consider visiting the family early and celebrate the holidays with them in October, for example. We've always had issues with family demanding everything happen on Christmas Day, usually also demanding we do all the travel and make all the sacrifices. With our kids, we celebrate when were together because that's all that matters. Forcing it to happen on a particular date when everyone is spread out is tough. Then you guys could spend Christmas in the desert or we always thought San Diego would be a nice place to spend the holiday.
  7. We're making preparation to change domicile to TX. Our MH will be delivered in mid Dec and we will be full time once we take delivery. We plan to get a Escapees PMB here in the near future, probably at the end of Sept, and then fly to TX on Oct 16th to take care of registration, DL, maybe start an account with a local bank, etc. We will stay in Houston on the 16th then drive to Livingston on the 17th. We'll be there all day on the 17th and 18th to take care of our domicile stuff and drive back to Houston and fly back home on the 19th. In short, we'll be in Livingston for two whole days, Tuesday and Wednesday. Is that enough time to register our Jeep, get driver's licenses, visit the bank, etc? From what I've read, you can usually do it in a day. Is Escapees, or can they, be part of the process? Do they assist in registration or DL forms? Anything else I should know before we make reservations? We're fairly well versed in the process in general, like what forms and ID we'll need, etc., but any details to make it easier or whatnot.
  8. How much do your basics weigh?

    I'm guessing it depends on you more than anything. Everyone is different. Different needs, different hobbies, different ideas about what "basics" means, etc. You've already got quite a range in just the few answers above. What an older, wealthy couple in a 45 foot diesel pusher carries, for instance, and a couple of 20-somethings living in a 14 foot travel trailer carries are wildly different. Heck, our son lives in a 1977 Ford Van and we know a kid that lives in a 1994 Jeep Wrangler. What they consider basic would fit in one storage compartment in most motorhomes. Better to figure out what you consider basic and then start weighing it. I bet you can get by on a few hundred pounds of stuff. And honestly, basic or essential items change depending on how much room you have to store it.
  9. How much time should I spend in new domicile state?

    I really think problems have more to do with the previous state rather than the new one. If you suddenly stop filing taxes in some of the tax hungry states, they might miss you and come looking. In Nevada, for instance, I doubt we'll have any issues when we change to SD or TX (haven't decided yet). Sales tax instead of income tax, we can "unregister" our Jeep online and toss the plates in the trash and other than that, we don't pay any thing to the state on a regular basis. We'll just be gone.
  10. Bridgeport CA, Boondock / Dry Camp Area - Big Rigable

    There's a few spots east of town along the East Walker River. All are along the highway but that's not well used at night..or even the day for that matter. Like 38.350570, -119.204280 or 38.366224, -119.198707. There are others If you continue into Nevada, there's a few spots along the highway but further away from the pavement. Try 38.511411, -119.209634 or 38.496519, -119.197912. Again, there are others. I've seen fivers parked back in those spots. It's a long dirt road but relatively smooth to get to this one at the Elbow on the river: 38.424037, -119.037279. Seen fivers and MH's at that one. The directory is called Days End. It's a small extra fee over the membership fee.
  11. Nervous but jumping in

    I regret, to some extent, building a home. Home ownership isn't what it used to be. Maybe it was the best investment you could make back in the day, but that's not our experience. We built a $300k home back in 2002. We took out an interest only loan so my wife could stay home with the kids. Plan was to refinance once they were older and the wife found work...only the housing bubble hit and we were so far underwater we couldn't refinance. So, why not pay extra? We did for a while until it become clear we were sinking money into a losing proposition (pay money in just to get it back when we sold...maybe). So we just paid the interest. We were able to refinance in 2014 and only did that because the payment was about the same. We lost money on the house. I mean we got some cash out when we sold it last year but less than our down and significantly less than all the improvements we'd made (and stopped making for the same reason we stopped paying the principle). So, we're not super concerned about buying a new motorhome to full time in (it cost less than 40% of what our house cost). We're not concerned about depreciation either. So what if we "lose" $50k. Been there, done that. Now we can live our dreams and spend a whole lot less money doing it. No regrets
  12. Class of 2017

    I guess I should post up since we're now members here and we've ordered our motorhome, a 2018 Newmar Bay Star 3113. We've been planning this for years. We sold our house last year but between getting one son off to the Marine Corp, another off to college, selling our house and my dad being in the hospital for 4 months (all better now) we put off our plans. But we weren't in our apartment for a month when we knew we had to go full-timing. Anyway, our MH will be delivered in mid December and we'll meet it in Las Vegas with a U-haul. We've got a friend with a warehouse and a gated lot so we can stay there to get loaded. Then we'll be on the road by the New Year, probably to Twentynine Palms to spend Christmas with our son and his new wife. Lots to do between now and then.
  13. We're in the middle of the same quandary...or were...as we get ready to order a new coach. We plan to boondock most of the time so a 2-way fridge seems the obvious choice. But there are some conditions that have us ready to order our unit with a res. fridge. First, 2-way RV fridges are finicky, expensive to repair and prone to starting fires (yes, we know its a tiny percentage but if you ask us, it's too much risk). Any thread or forum about fridges are full of 2-way fridge complaints but most folks seen to love their res. fridges and wouldn't go back. Second, our coach normally comes with two house batteries in the forward engine bay (Newmar Bay Star 3113) but the res. fridge option means we get four batteries mid coach on a sliding tray. That's a personal thing but for us, it's a real bonus. Lastly, res. fridges work. The get cold faster, stay colder, are better insulated and run forever (not to mention they don't start many fires). We will upgrade to 4 6v batteries right up front. We'll follow with solar as soon as possible and probably sink money into a portable gennie to avoid using the big 5500w coach generator all day to charge batteries (much cheaper and quieter). We also plan to put the fridge on a timer to shut her down at night (when outside temps allow) to save amps. It's a choice we're willing to live with because, in our opinion, residential refrigerators are far superior to 2-way fridges.
  14. FMCA Verizon Group Program

    The nice part about the plan as I understand it is the hot spot is yours to keep and there is no contract. I can't see a downside to grabbing this and using it as long as it lasts. If a year from now Verizon kills it, you still have a nice hot spot. I think FMCA even points that out in their announcement. And I'm honestly surprised it took a major RV group this long to work out a deal with a major carrier for a more RV/full time friendly data plan. I wonder how long it will take Good Sam, Escapees, etc. to hammer out their own deals. This time next year, we might have several option like this and maybe better options.
  15. I think you have it backwards. I always wondered if our house would stand up to the abuse our washing machine dished out. I can't imagine a few bumps along the road are any worse than the gyrations and vibrations most washers go through in normal operating mode.
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