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Volvo D12D Crankcase Pressure Sensor failure - DOA engine shut down


RandyA
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Left Florida yesterday.  Rolling down the interstate and engine shuts off.  Turn ignition key off and then on to restart.  No power steering when engine shuts down.  Made it to Brunswick, GA last night and into a campsite after multiple shutdowns.  DID code indicates Crankcase Pressure Sensor as fault.  Took it out of engine today and tried to find a replacement.  Went to TA, Flying J, Speedco, Loves and NAPA.  Only option is to order from Volvo dealer in Jacksonville FL or Savanna GA which are closed Sunday so Monday evening or Tuesday for a replacement.  Decided to see what happened when the sensor was simply disconnected.  Much to my surprise engine seems to run fine.  DID tells me to "Check Engine ECU at Next Stop".  This is not a shut down message.  Leaving tomorrow (Sunday) for next stop at Bass Lake CG in Dillion SC just south of the NC state line.  Hoping and praying disconnecting sensor does not result in shutdown and we make it OK.  Does anyone know somethings I don't that will help?  Apparently failure of this sensor is not uncommon.  OTR has a nice Youtube video on changing.  Might be smart to carry a spare sensor in the future.

Edited by RandyA
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300 miles today with crankcase pressure sensor disconnected.  No problems, truck ran great.  Put that one in your logbook in case you ever have the same shut down from the sensor.  Carl, sorry about the output speed sensor problem.  Nine hours is a lot of time.  We did have a blow out on the right front trailer tire in SC.  No logical reason other than road hazard.  Using pressure monitor, tire is a 17.5 H rated tire running 110 psi cold.  Tire is two years old.  Definitely not overloaded.  Speed was 63 mph.  Changing was difficult due to narrow shoulder making me pull over on the grass which had an incline.  Traffic did not slow or move - each passing truck moved enough air to shake the trailer.  Actually, a very scary situation.  Had to use my hydraulic levelers and then a bottle jack to get spare on.  Could have called my emergency road service but that is usually a 2+ hour wait.  Settled in at campground for the night.  Tired and dirty 🤕.

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11 hours ago, RandyA said:

Changing was difficult due to narrow shoulder making me pull over on the grass which had an incline.  Traffic did not slow or move - each passing truck moved enough air to shake the trailer.  Actually, a very scary situation.  Had to use my hydraulic levelers and then a bottle jack to get spare on.  Could have called my emergency road service but that is usually a 2+ hour wait. 

Why do so many drivers not consider what it would be like for them at the side of the road????????

I ALWAYS slow down and pull into the other lane on a multi lane road and it the only time I will cut off a passing vehicle. I KEEP right unless I'm passing or turning LEFT in less than a block. 

I'm starting to think the Safest thing for ME would be to just remain in the traveled portion of the road and getting the change done quickly. I would of course put out reflective markers well away from my vehicle. Did you put the markers in the traveled portion?

I once ran out of gas on my Goldwing Motorcycle in Southern Nevada. It was a multi lane road, but the shoulder was not firm enough to support the "Kick Stand" and no one seemed to want to pull over enough to allow me to stand beside the bike to try the center stand until a State Patrol officer pulled up with his lighted vehicle. They also gave me a ride to the next gas station, but would not take the donation of an empty gas can. (Apparently I wasn't the first to offer).  Part of me thought it might have been better if I had left the bike on the road with that hazard lights on and took cover in the ditch. 

 

Rod

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  • 4 weeks later...

Rod, traffic was heavy with little space for someone to move over.  As I noted, SCARY!  I put out six flares and two triangle reflectors.  The 30 minute flares were placed just inside the white line on the shoulder.  They almost immediately blew out or rolled away from the wind of passing vehicles.  I had no weights or rocks to hold them in place.  These were the same flares LEO's use, not off brand.  Thinking about what you said about just stopping in the travel lane........ If first vehicle stopped before ramming you and did not swerve or cut to the passing lane maybe you could build a safety line behind you.  Still, vehicles in that line would do their best to cut around into the passing lane.  All of this reminds me of some recent 50+ car pileups on the Interstate due to lack of attention.  My second major problem was the right shoulder I was on (South Carolina I-95).  It was no more than 1/2 of a lane wide - say 6 feet wide.  Next to the shoulder was grass that sloped away from the road making the entire rig tilt to the right.  This put the right front axle with the flat tire about 6" above soft earth.  I was extremely thankful for my hydraulic leveling jacks as I was able to lift the trailer a few more inches and give some form of stabilization.  My bottle jack still would not fit under the axle so I got out a shovel and started digging.  Good and bad - the earth was soft.  I got the jack under the axle and for every inch I lifted the axle another inch of the jack buried in the ground.  I finally got a 2x6 and a second bottle jack under the axle and lifted it enough to change the tire.  It was truly being between a rock and a hard place.

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It can be scary.  We once blew three tires at once.  Center one exploded, flying pieces grabbed the TPM sensors and yanked the valve stems out.  Metal valve stems too.  Shoulder was about 7' between guard rail and fog line.  Luckily, a county officer parked up stream about 100 yds to give us a buffer.

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11 hours ago, RandyA said:

Rod, traffic was heavy with little space for someone to move over.  As I noted, SCARY!  I put out six flares and two triangle reflectors.  The 30 minute flares were placed just inside the white line on the shoulder.  They almost immediately blew out or rolled away from the wind of passing vehicles.  I had no weights or rocks to hold them in place.  These were the same flares LEO's use, not off brand.  Thinking about what you said about just stopping in the travel lane........ If first vehicle stopped before ramming you and did not swerve or cut to the passing lane maybe you could build a safety line behind you.  Still, vehicles in that line would do their best to cut around into the passing lane.  All of this reminds me of some recent 50+ car pileups on the Interstate due to lack of attention.  My second major problem was the right shoulder I was on (South Carolina I-95).  It was no more than 1/2 of a lane wide - say 6 feet wide.  Next to the shoulder was grass that sloped away from the road making the entire rig tilt to the right.  This put the right front axle with the flat tire about 6" above soft earth.  I was extremely thankful for my hydraulic leveling jacks as I was able to lift the trailer a few more inches and give some form of stabilization.  My bottle jack still would not fit under the axle so I got out a shovel and started digging.  Good and bad - the earth was soft.  I got the jack under the axle and for every inch I lifted the axle another inch of the jack buried in the ground.  I finally got a 2x6 and a second bottle jack under the axle and lifted it enough to change the tire.  It was truly being between a rock and a hard place.

I know some people who only use the 2 lane roads for all of their trips. It takes a lot longer, but if there is an issue where they need to pull off the road it's usually just a couple miles to the next road that could take care of the issue. 

There have been a couple 50 plus accidents on the Interstate highway near where I am and it's been said the cause was someone suddenly slowing due to poor visibility while in the left lane. 

Of course there is the not paying attention situation that extended the accident, but if the visibility is low why is a driver not paying attention? ??

I still ride a motorcycle nearly every day and on every trip I see more heads tilted toward their laps than looking at where they are going. My head is always moving from side to side looking at the drivers of all of the vehicles near me. I stay in the right lane and only pass when I can with a purpose. I do not ride the left lane following the long line of people who seem think it's the "SAFEST" lane to drive in. 

Taking a long motorcycle ride today and coming back this weekend. 

 

Rod 

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I guess the thread is shifting, but since I started it I hope that is OK.  One issue that really stood out to me was after I got the tire changed and we were later driving through a construction zone for what seemed like forever,  there was no right shoulder at all, just those big concrete Jersey barriers.  Not even an occasional opening for pulling to the side.  I couldn't help but wonder what the heck I would do if a tire blew or the D12 engine shut down under this situation.  The fact that I couldn't get a jack under the axle, or actually the spring plate, also bothered me.  The hydraulic levelers lifted the trailer upward on the suspension and reduced the body tilt but did not lift the axle with the flat off the ground.   Too much weight with the trailer slanted right.  I started thinking about getting one of those stubby bottle jacks like HF sells for the future possibility of such a situation so I could possibly get lifting started with no real clearance to the ground for a regular jack.  A garage jack could have worked but they are big and heavy, even the aluminum ones and that is something else to carry with all the other stuff on a HDT.  If I kept on driving until I could get to an exit the wheel would have been ruined and the camper severely damaged.  Stupid on my part to put equipment before my safety.  I do have a 20T air over hydraulic bottle jack with blocks for the HDT but that was useless here.  With traffic flying by, no real shoulder, a pretty big RV rig, no Police, equipment (jacks) that didn't fit, long-wait road service, etc.  I was honestly wishing for a set of bright blue strobes I could put on the back of the RV but I doubt that would have helped much.  Any good suggestions?

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