Jump to content

Iota 55 amp converter questions


Recommended Posts

As some know I have issues since putting in the 48/70 amp chinese  converter. My stock Iota 55 has ran everything fine by itself. For now I am unhooking the chinese converter and connecting up my Iota. My Iota has a plug on it for charge controller option. Iota makes a lithium one. $18.99. Charges bulk to 14.7 volts. floats and maintains. I am considering getting a 20 ah 12v lithium battery. Out of work right now and money is limited. Sound like a game plan?

Edited by GlennWest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nothing wrong with that.  Batteries will only draw as much charging current as they need.  A 55 amp converter won't overcharge a small battery.

Think of electricity in water terms.  Voltage is pressure, amps is flow rate (gallons per minute).  You can have a large pump or a small pump but as long as the pressure is right, you'll only get so much flow out of a garden hose sprayer.

Same with your battery.  As long as the voltage is right (14.7 volts) it will only drink as much current as it needs.

Edited by Lou Schneider
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Lithium batteries are rated for the maximum charge amps.  Typically .5c to 1c but it varies.  A BMS will also likely restrict the amount of current allowed through it.  Many times it will just open the circuit for charging or even stop all current in or out for a period of time if that value is exceeded.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, GlennWest said:

Interesting. Plainly states 20 amps max charging. Has a bms and the way i understand a bms won't allow overcharging.

Most BMS's have a maximum amount of current that will pass in or out and typically act like a circuit breaker.  If that current limit is exceeded the BMS will open the circuit.  Over charging to an unsafe voltage is also limited with most BMS's but as long as the cells are balanced and the charger is set to the correct voltage the BMS will not restrict the charging as the battery will only charge to the chargers set voltage.  One BMS 2 different functions.  Another function of many BMS's is to maintain safe voltages, to high or to low in each cell.  If these voltages are outside of the limits the BMS will also open the circuit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Iota is a 55 amp charger. Will it put out less? I don't know. Have to research this. Well I did and states will put out as much as 55. That I understand as put out just as much as needed up to 55 amp. Module to add to it changes to lithium profile and 14.7 volts. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B087JKQGJB/ref=ask_ql_qh_dp_hza?th=1      This is the battery considering. Just something for water pump and led lights when needed traveling. And aid in slide outs.

Edited by GlennWest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Think I will can that idea. Just wait and when money coming in again get 2 30 amp Victron Orions. The Iota converter run slides fine. Anything in our Teton. Just no DC power until plugged in. Oh, side note, played with the chinese converter some. It is supplying 12.3 volts until high load and it drops to 10ish. It was good on all but the slideouts. Truly it is not what it rated at. That unit has good reviews too. It was worth a try though. Those 2 Orions $430.00. 

Edited by GlennWest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 minute ago, GlennWest said:

Are we not looking at this right?

Not really. When you open a 1 liter bottle of wine, you do not have to drink all of it.

16 hours ago, Lou Schneider said:

Think of electricity in water terms.  Voltage is pressure, amps is flow rate (gallons per minute).  You can have a large pump or a small pump but as long as the pressure is right, you'll only get so much flow out of a garden hose sprayer.

Same with your battery.  As long as the voltage is right (14.7 volts) it will only drink as much current as it needs.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, Kirk W said:

Not really. When you open a 1 liter bottle of wine, you do not have to drink all of it.

 

So are you saying I should be good with my 55 amp converter with the lithium module and the 20ah battery? I don't know of any who has one. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While that converter can supply more than the battery needs, it will not force it on the battery. That is a function of applied voltage. But when you have a converter that can supply more than the maximum current needed by the battery it can supply current to other loads at the same time as the battery is being charged. Remember that your converter is more than just a battery charger, but it supplies all of the 12V power to the RV at the same time as it is charging the battery. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Think I will give it a shot. Won't be out of a lot if it kills it. Thanks. Been researching batteries this morning. Lots of batteries that people use are just car batteries, cheap. And I hear no mention of then boiling acid out or anything. And their chargers are way more than batteries rated for.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

One might want to look up the charging profiles of a lithium battery.  Because they have little internal resistance these batteries charge at very high rates until charged.  This charging is very different than lead acid.  If I were to even consider what you are thinking about I would NOT purchase the lithium addition for the converter.   First it charges to 14.7v.  None of the batteries you are looking at are rated for that voltage.  Lithium batteries do not need to be charged 100%.  13.5 to 13.6v is a fully charged battery and unlike lead acid given time the battery will reach that voltage even if without a higher voltage charge.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

51 minutes ago, Randyretired said:

One might want to look up the charging profiles of a lithium battery.  Because they have little internal resistance these batteries charge at very high rates until charged.  This charging is very different than lead acid.  If I were to even consider what you are thinking about I would NOT purchase the lithium addition for the converter.   First it charges to 14.7v.  None of the batteries you are looking at are rated for that voltage.  Lithium batteries do not need to be charged 100%.  13.5 to 13.6v is a fully charged battery and unlike lead acid given time the battery will reach that voltage even if without a higher voltage charge.

I was just on their site and max voltage is 14.8. Recommend charging at 14.5. I should be good. It may shorten life some but this not permanent situation unless it works better than I think it will. Intend to be on inverter power later and will still need 12v somehow. I could just use as is without module. Just will never reach full charge. I don't have a lot of ah to start with though. 

Edited by GlennWest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

We have a 90 amp converter in our trailer. I think you are misreading what it does. The larger converters allow more 12 volt circuits, or larger amp circuits, to be handled by the converter similar to how a larger alternator (or multiple alternators) are used for vehicles with large stereo systems.

 

When you are plugged into shore power, your converter then provides more amperage to power the 12v accessories and provides enough power to charge to batteries with the maximum they will take. You might notice that when you are not connected to shore power and running off of battery power that lights dim when using high power items like the water pump or inverter but didn't do it when hooked to shore power. If you have a smaller converter and are powering 12 volt items in your RV, you may not be able to have enough amperage to recharge the batteries at their maximum thus taking longer to recharge them. 

Edited by Star Dreamer
Link to comment
Share on other sites

30 minutes ago, GlennWest said:

Actually my 12v load is light. Residential fridge, all led lights, mini splits are our heat until freezing temps. Recently checked it and if I remember correctly 3or4 amps. 

What about water pump, awnings, propane furnace fan (you may not have one now that you have mini splits), leveling system, slide outs, stereo, 12v TV if you have one, etc...? What 12 volt fuses to you have in your fuse panel? Obviously many of those loads are only when needed. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

RVers Online University

campgroundviews.com

Our program provides accurate individual wheel weights for your RV, toad, and tow vehicle, and will help you trim the pounds if you need to.

All the water you need...No matter where you go

Country Thunder Iowa

Nomad Internet

Rv Share

Dish For My RV.

RV Air.

Find out more or sign up for Escapees RV'ers Bootcamp.

Advertise your product or service here.

The Rvers- Now Streaming

RVTravel.com Logo



×
×
  • Create New...