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Teslas Are Great For Road Tripping — Ignore The Anti-Tesla Myths


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Sheesh! People still believe this happy horse manure?

Excerpt:

"HotCars recently published an article titled “10 Biggest Problems with Owning a Tesla,” and the article is, frankly, filled with misinformation — almost from top to bottom. I’m just tackling two of the issues here, since they are probably fairly common misperceptions (thanks in part to misleading articles like the one above), or at least things that many potential buyers might ask about.

The article claims that buying a Tesla would put you at “risk of problems most other car owners don’t have to deal with.” The evidence is lacking. One of the so-called problems listed is range. According to the article, Teslas are not very good cars for traveling on long road trips. The article claimed that the average range of a Tesla Model 3 is around 350 miles on a single charge, and pointed out that this is dependent on speed, weather, and interstate driving. He stated that “they still are not very good cars for traveling on long road trips.”

Clearly, the author of this article hasn’t even tried to go on a long road trip in a Tesla, nor has he done his research on Tesla road trips. I’m sure if he had asked Tesla owners who took such trips, he would have found out how easy and pleasant road trips are for them. Since he hasn’t done his research into Tesla road trips and range, I’ll do some for him.

Taking A 2015 Tesla Model S Across Europe

Interestingly, in the midst of the misinformation, the author used a CleanTechnica photo (illegally) of a Tesla Model S that very conveniently took a trip across Europe — from Poland to Paris — in 2017. In fact, our chief editor, Zachary Shahan, and one other person took that trip and wrote about it here on CleanTechnica. Zach called it “the most comfortable and convenient long-distance road trip I’ve ever taken.” (Side note: the Model S photo is fine to use, as long as you indicate the source — Zachary Shahan, CleanTechnica — and link to our site.)

North American Road Trip

Wade Anderson actually drove from Arizona to the Arctic Circle in his Tesla Model 3 in 2019. Wade drove a total of 18,857 miles in his Tesla and literally made a big circle around the United States and Canada. Wade started his trip in July 2019 and even came through Baton Rouge. He was the first person who ever took me on a ride in a Tesla — I had recently started writing for CleanTechnica and we got connected due to his trip.

Wade drove from Arizona to Florida, up the coast to Maine, then on to Canada, where he was interviewed by CBC Canada. After that, he continued on to Alaska and made his way to the Arctic Circle, where he took some of the coolest photos of a Tesla ever taken. You can read more about his journey here.

The Fastest EV Lightning Run Across Canada In A Model 3

Towards the end of 2019, Tesla completed its Trans-Canada Supercharger route from Vancouver to Halifax as a part of the expansion of its Supercharger network. In celebration of this, Ian Pavelko and Trevor Page drove a Tesla Model 3 from Tsawwassen, BC, to Halifax, and did it within 72 hours.

Charging Stations

The article also mentioned a lack of charging stations outside of cities, and although this was a concern a couple of years ago, Tesla has been expanding its Supercharging network fast. Currently, Tesla has over 25,000 Superchargers in the world. This makes it the largest global, fast-charging network in the world.

It is in fact Tesla’s extensive Supercharging network and its brilliant navigation system that together make Tesla road trips so easy, convenient, and comfortable. Many owners also like to meet other Tesla owners they share a charge with.

The article, to me, read as if the author was trying to convince his readers to not buy a Tesla, but also to not buy an EV at all. There are many points that can be refuted, but this one practically jumped off the page:

Screen-Shot-2021-09-18-at-8.21.50-PM.png

Screenshot of HotCars claiming no Tesla can tow.

This claim is 100% incorrect: “Every Tesla model out there is unable to tow.” I have seen with my very own eyes a Tesla Model X tow a boat. Let me show you the receipts.

Source with more pics and links here:

https://cleantechnica.com/2021/09/19/teslas-are-great-for-road-tripping-ignore-the-anti-tesla-myths/

Edited by RV_
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I know right? I am about to go see a friend who sold his used Model Y for $10k over list and bought a Tesla Plaid. Maybe I can get a drive?? We just met today and I am going overt to buy a Surface Mouse from him. 🤞🤞

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21 hours ago, vermilye said:

I guess they also make good tow vehicles for trailers.  I watched a Tesla sedan pulling a 25' Airstream out of the campground.  They hauled it to & from London Ontario to Niagara Falls.  The Tesla was outfitted by Can-Am RV...

An electric vehicle has electric traction motors like a locomotive - so can pull on trailers quite nicely. Very high torque at very low vehicle speed.

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Mark I'm glad to hear you are loving your Mustang. And that the trip went so well!

Were you using Tesla Superchargers? I'd heard they were going to open them up to other brands sometime soon. Are they doing that already?

 

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On 9/23/2021 at 10:07 AM, noteven said:

An electric vehicle has electric traction motors like a locomotive - so can pull on trailers quite nicely. Very high torque at very low vehicle speed.

noteven you really need to go take a top powered EV for a test drive. If they have them, in stock test drives are free, and encouraged.

Let me clear up a misconception. They don't have high torque at a low speed like diesels:

"Electric vehicles are, in fact, generally quicker than their gasoline-powered counterparts. That’s because an electric motor generates 100% of its available torque instantly. When the driver of an EV pushes down on the accelerator pedal, the transition from stationary to speed is almost instantaneous."

Source: https://www.myev.com/research/ev-101/10-common-electric-car-myths-busted

But until you drive one, even the slowest Tesla like mine that only does the 0-60 in 4.5 seconds, it is not understood.

I mentioned above that I was going to see a friend with a brand new Tesla Model S "Plaid!" He bought his Model Y last year a few months after I bought mine and sold it when his order for a Plaid came in a couple of weeks ago. I went and he offered to show me the difference between a Model Y and the Plaid which is the fastest production car in the world AFAIK. It has a butterfly steering wheel that's not a wheel.

Anyway bear in mind us Tesla and e Mustang owners all have, had, or driven, gas, diesel, and maybe even propane vehicles before and can compare. But we also know what surprised us unexpectedly on first driving a Tesla. I can't speak to Ford EVs with no experience, and do know Leafs (slow) and MiEVs (slower) as, and diesel abysmally slower, but Teslas do not peel rubber, 100% of that instant torque goes to the ground.

So having owned a Model Y he knew what I wasn't expecting from the Model S Plaid in raw power. I mean how much more can it be, right? So he said as we motored to the highway that he hoped I would not mind a violent demonstration of its power on our test drive and I said bring it on.

OK people freak when I take them in my much slower Model Y. The Plaid Model S surprised me even more because I expected a little more than my Y. But not the crazy violent power it has.

No slippage at the wheels - if I had not had my cervical surgery several years ago I would have been reeling in pain. The straight was phenomenal. I banged my head pretty hard because I thought I was used to it and over-confident. Then he did S curves at speed and despite my seat belt it bounced me around the passenger space.

I loved it and since I was buying another Model Y or Model 2 if it is out soon enough, to replace Lynn's Forester, perhaps we can save time and just get a plaid which is a bit more than twice the price of the Y. And there is no shifting to slow down acceleration like all Tesla models, all one speed trannys to top speed.

If you ever get the chance to get a ride or drive a Plaid do not refuse if you are a car enthusiast and  sporty driver.

I NEVER EXPECTED THAT POWER WITH NO TIRE SLIPPAGE. IT IS SHOCKING.

Here's a YouTube video of a 1/4 mile race between the McClaren and a Tesla 2021 Plaid.

Important fact: This guy in the video is like Leno with a whole stable of the fastest cars in the world. So this is no pro or anti-Tesla anything. He has no fanaticism one way (Gas) or the other (EV.)

 

 

 

Edited by RV_
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RV - the issue with high output straight line acceleration everyone talks about incessantly is that the human being becomes conditioned to it quite quickly.

As I've posted before I had a chance to ride a truly fast electric motorcycle.  Whirrrr .... whir....whirrrrr...whir...whirrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr.....whirrr.... yawn....

It was a very capable appliance.  Made even me look like a fast rider. 

But that is the thing with electric motivation - it is so seamless it is utterly boring after the first couple or three woo hoo twist of the blender control. 

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We used Electrify America 50 Kw and 150Kw chargers.  We have a Tesla Destination charger adapter but we haven't used it yet, that is L2.

Elon hasn't made Testla Super Chargers available to other brands yet.  Its more than just an adapter.

I did spin rubber once.  I punched-it leaving an intersection while turning.  Never in a straight line, just zoooom.

Edited by Mark and Dale Bruss
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On 9/22/2021 at 12:13 PM, vermilye said:

I guess they also make good tow vehicles for trailers.  I watched a Tesla sedan pulling a 25' Airstream out of the campground.  They hauled it to & from London Ontario to Niagara Falls.  The Tesla was outfitted by Can-Am RV...

Here is a video of the Tesla Model 3 and Airstream that belongs to the owner of Can-Am RV

Tesla Model 3 towing Airstream

Also - there are some nuggets of tow setup knowledge not restricted to Teslas and Airstreams. 

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Hey thanks noteven! I just got the chance to watch that whole video and was amazed. Since my Model Y shares most of the Model 3 sled it applies to mine very well. We had talked about getting a small trailer just for weekends. Looks like that's very doable.😀

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Watch out RV!

Andy and CanAm RV are much maligned on the interweb.  You too could take a tomato or two for daring to suggest 50 years of installing hitch systems on a zillion different types of tow vehicles might be useful knowledge. 

They are not in the video business but they put up some old footage of testing various tow vehicles through a slalom course and an emergency watch out swerve lane change towing an Airstream and a cracker box trailer. 

Which vehicles are most controlled and composed is quite interesting. 

Of course a lot of this is moot nowadays because it is difficult to buy a "car" that can be geared properly for towing. 

Except for a certain type which has traction motors like a locomotive 🤣

 

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Mr. Musk if you are reading this:

1. Build an aerodynamic travel trailer (shaped more like a SpaceX rocket than that door stop of a pickup truck) with a flat floor filled with a battery pack. Let the trailer extend its own range. Shape the front of the trailer with an optional fairing kit that is Tesla car model specific that closes the gap trailer to car to minimum required for swing and dip clearance.  Have an extend feature on the trailer's hitch to roll it back away from the car when stopped for trunk access, step over hitch vs walk all the way around etc. 

2. Add a connector trailer to car through a great big bejeesus plug with cooling lines and electical pressure wires and data wires to your Tesla towing package to connect the trailer and car. 

3. Roof the trailer with Tesla solar panels. 

4. Have an option to add a traction motor to the trailer for dynamic (regenerative) braking and so it can help itself in sand and snow etc and not be such an anchor in adverse conditions. 

etc. 

 

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Hotcars might have at least asked Tesla owners prior to writing that article. My cousin and her husband attended my Mom's funeral last Aug by driving their Tesla 450 miles from NW Chicago to our home. He said the trip was very relaxing, and quiet. He re-charged prior to leaving my city.

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On 9/30/2021 at 6:42 AM, noteven said:

Mr. Musk if you are reading this:

1. Build an aerodynamic travel trailer (shaped more like a SpaceX rocket than that door stop of a pickup truck) with a flat floor filled with a battery pack. Let the trailer extend its own range. Shape the front of the trailer with an optional fairing kit that is Tesla car model specific that closes the gap trailer to car to minimum required for swing and dip clearance.  Have an extend feature on the trailer's hitch to roll it back away from the car when stopped for trunk access, step over hitch vs walk all the way around etc. 

2. Add a connector trailer to car through a great big bejeesus plug with cooling lines and electical pressure wires and data wires to your Tesla towing package to connect the trailer and car. 

3. Roof the trailer with Tesla solar panels. 

4. Have an option to add a traction motor to the trailer for dynamic (regenerative) braking and so it can help itself in sand and snow etc and not be such an anchor in adverse conditions. 

etc. 

 

Sounds good to me!

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On 9/26/2021 at 3:56 AM, Mark and Dale Bruss said:

We used Electrify America 50 Kw and 150Kw chargers.  We have a Tesla Destination charger adapter but we haven't used it yet, that is L2.

Elon hasn't made Testla Super Chargers available to other brands yet.  Its more than just an adapter.

I did spin rubber once.  I punched-it leaving an intersection while turning.  Never in a straight line, just zoooom.

Just give it a bit because most of us Tesla owners are neutral to unhappy about letting the other brands in. I am neutral until I see how it works out.

Because of electronic control we should decide on a standard plug and stick to it so adapters are no longer necessary except for pre-standardization cars which would need adapters.

I can see police getting mad when we let each other test drive each other's cars and quietly break speed limits around chargers which will be like the ol;d office water coolers for the latest news and gossip!

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6 hours ago, bigjim said:

In case I missed it has anyone covered spare tires for Tesla's,  A friend here has one and he had a flat and does not have spare. Do all Tesla's not have a spare.

Jim they don't come with one.

"Tesla Roadside Assistance is committed to providing you with immediate roadside services, 24/7 365 days a year. This team is dedicated to roadside support, so for any other questions visit our Customer Support page.

If you’re ever in an unsafe location, please contact emergency services.

Requesting Roadside Assistance

You can request immediate roadside assistance from the bottom of the Tesla app home screen. In your request, please include any information that may help our team locate you and best understand the condition of your car.

To request roadside assistance from your Tesla app:

  1. Open the app and select ‘Roadside.'
  2. Select the issue(s) your car is experiencing.
  3. Confirm any additional details related to your request.
  4. Select ‘Request help.’

 

 

Services Covered

Breakdowns
A warrantable breakdown of the car that renders it un-drivable.
Coverage: Transportation services of up to 500 miles to the nearest Service Center are provided.

Flat Tire
Damage to the wheel or tire that causes flat or unsafe driving conditions.
Coverage: Flat tire services are provided for up to 50 miles.

Lockouts
Circumstances where the car cannot be unlocked normally due to car, fob or app malfunction.
Coverage: A Roadside Professional will perform a lockout on your vehicle by creating a small opening between the door and car frame in order to manually open your door.

Out of Range
When your battery charge is depleted and you can’t make it to a charging station, or the car has been unplugged for an extended period of time.
Coverage: We are able to assist you, but this is not a financially covered service. Contact Roadside Assistance to learn more or arrange a transport.

Additional Coverage
For all services not listed, we are still equipped and ready to assist you. Review our Roadside Assistance policy for service details and what you may need to provide payment for."

Source:

https://www.tesla.com/support/roadside-assistance#request-roadside

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  • 2 weeks later...

Welcome to the Forums Samuel. YW! I have been following Musk since the PayPal Mafia sold to eBay and became billionaires with Musk who started Space X and funded JB Strauble's Tesla company and as CEO made it happen.

JB is starting up an EV recycling company that "mines batteries" in a new way anticipating better and cheaper materials as a result.

I invested in Tesla on IPO and made serious money and did it again last year when it dipped to$350 a share and has since more than doubled. And I'm past a year and a few months so no longer have to pay short term capital gains tax when I decide to get out again. However I held my first shares bought at $17 for eight years at $348.

Meanwhile the industry is poised to pivot from ICE cars to EVs, with VW showing more commitment and investment than the others as far as I see.

I am interested in investing because banks still lendat the old rates and more but pay under .5% by and large.

So I read and am interested in all things EV. And making more than .5% interest.

When I see an interesting new development in EVs I post here.

As well I follow Starlink and have a block ready to invest when they IPO.

And of course used some of my EV profits to buy my Model Y. Bill and Diane just visited and took it for a spin. Of course they own a great little hybrid so are not strangers to EVs.

Again welcome to the SKP forums!

Edited by RV_
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2gypsies,

He starts with outright lies saying:

Lie #1: "Lithium-ion batteries are bulkier and take more space than their traditional counterpart, lead-acid batteries. "

Truth:

"Energy Density Comparison of Size & Weight

The below battery comparison chart illustrates the volumetric and specific energy densities showing smaller sizes and lighter weight cells.

Battery Cell Energy Density

 

Lie #2: "To make matters worse, they’re (Li-Ion) highly flammable and even explosive if dismantled incorrectly."

Facts: Compare the last line in the chart below comparing toxicity:

Specifications by Battery Chemistry

Specifications Lead Acid NiCd NiMH Li-ion
Cobalt Manganese Phosphate
Specific Energy Density (Wh/kg) 30-50 45-80 60-120 150-190 100-135 90-120
Internal Resistance (mΩ) <100
12V pack
100-200
6V pack
200-300
6V pack
150-300
7.2V
25-75
per cell
25-50
per cell
Life Cycle (80% discharge) 200-300 1000 300-500 500-1,000 500-1,000 1,000-2,000
Fast-Charge Time 8-16h 1h typical 2-4h 2-4h 1h or less 1h or less
Overcharge Tolerance High Moderate Low Low. Cannot tolerate trickle charge
Self-Discharge/month (room temp) 5% 20% 30% <10%
Cell Voltage (nominal) 2V 1.2V 1.2V 3.6V 3.8V 3.3V
Charge Cutoff Voltage (V/cell) 2.40
Float 2.25
Full charge detection
by voltage signature
4.20 3.60
Discharge Cutoff Voltage (V/cell, 1C) 1.75 1.00 2.50-3.00 2.80
Peak Load Current
Best Result
5C
0.2C
20C
1C
5C
0.5C
>3C
<1C
>30C
<10C
>30C
<10C
Charge Temperature -20 to 50°C
-4 to 122°F
0 to 45°C
32 to 113°F
0 to 45°C
32 to 113°F
Discharge Temperature -20 to 50°C
-4 to 122°F
-20 to 65°C
-4 to 149°F
-20 to 60°C
-4 to 140°F
Maintenance Requirement 3-6 Months
(topping charge)
30-60 days
(discharge)
60-90 days
(discharge)
Not required
Safety Requirements Thermally stable Thermally stable, fuse protection common Protection circuit mandatory
In Use Since Late 1800s 1950 1990 1991 1996 1999
Toxicity Very High Very High Low Low


Source of those facts with comparisons and engineering facts on all types here:

https://www.epectec.com/batteries/cell-comparison.html

"Why do batteries explode?

Lead acid batteries

During charging all lead-acid batteries produce hydrogen & oxygen which is evolved by the breaking up of the electrolyte into hydrogen & oxygen. Towards the end of the charge, the rate of production of hydrogen & oxygen gases increases. It also increases if the battery is overcharged or charged too rapidly. Flooded batteries always let out these gases through the vent plugs. An ignition source near this area where the concentration of hydrogen gases is over the explosive range of 4% increases the risk of explosion.

If a path exists into the battery like in a vented battery, the flame may continue into the battery casing, igniting gases that may be inside, thereby increasing the pressure inside the container & causing the container to explode. The explosion reaction is 2H2 + O2 => 2H2O + Heat."

Source: https://microtexindia.com/why-do-batteries-explode/

2gypsies, that opinion piece is pretty cleverly written, he's right that recycling currently is not up to demand, and damns with faint praise to the very end. The problem with those "hit" pieces that depend on a reader's ignorance, is that more people every day take test drive and buy EVs. The EV haters who know zip, and want to believe outright lies about Tesla and EVs in general, (confirmation bias) are becoming smaller and smaller. Hit piece source: Your link 2Gypsies.

JB's record of execution: Starting Tesla, engineering through the factory builds and manufacturing several Tesla models. He says:

"After extracting and crushing the used batteries, Redwood uses giant machines to separate the materials. It’s able to recover 80% of a battery’s lithium, and up to 95% of other materials such as cobalt, aluminum, graphite, and nickel. At the end of the process, these are packed into barrels, to be shipped to customers and made into new batteries.

Unlike recycling household materials such as paper, glass or plastic, recycling batteries is surprisingly profitable. Straubel explains that, while Redwood is still in a rapid growth phase, investing to build its operations and deploy new equipment, “the unit operations are profitable, so we’re able to take these input materials, refine them, purify them and sell them at a profitable unit margin.”

Recycling is economical compared to mining, even at this early stage, and Straubel says “it’s getting better quite quickly as we improve the technology and scale.”

Redwood isn’t alone in its quest to turn trash into treasure. Another big player in North America is Li-Cycle, which has recycling plants in Ontario and New York. Li-Cycle Executive Chairman Tim Johnston tells CNBC that recycling is more efficient than mining — it uses less energy, less water and less toxic chemicals. “A mining company looking to produce similar materials would struggle to produce the same levels of margin that we can deliver.”

“This absolutely could be more profitable than mining,” Straubel agrees.

The anti-EV crowd is fond of the idea that EV batteries will create an environmental disaster, heedless of the fact that Straubel and many other brilliant entrepreneurs around the world are hard at work on the issue, which promises to be a profit center, not a problem.

“Batteries from EVs will not go in landfills,” Li-Cycle CEO Ajay Kochhar assures us. “There are technologies available like ours that are efficient, profitable, don’t need subsidies, and can do this as a growing, sustainable business.” Source: https://cleantechnica.com/2021/05/02/tesla-cofounder-jb-straubel-the-largest-lithium-mine-could-be-in-the-junk-drawers-of-america/

Anyone after more facts here are all the major players including VW ramping up recycling and battery production:

More sources:

https://cleantechnica.com/?s=Battery+recycling

 

 

 

 

Edited by RV_
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The October issue of National Geographic magazine has an extensive article on electric cars and their future but I find that it is only available online to subscribers. I attempted to add a link to the article but.............  

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